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Fresh Air

Fresh Air

Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with today's biggest luminaries.

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Episodes

Actor Courtney B. Vance / Remembering Bob Moses

Vance is nominated for an Emmy for his guest appearance in the HBO series 'Lovecraft Country.' He played the charismatic and show-stopping attorney Johnnie Cochran in 'The People v. O.J. Simpson.' More recently, he played Aretha Franklin's father, Rev. C.L Franklin, in 'Genius: Aretha.'

Also, John Powers reviews a new edition of a 1963 novel by black reporter William Gardner Smith.

Then, we remember pioneering civil rights activist Bob Moses. He died Sunday at age 86.

Finally, Kevin Whitehead reviews two very different new albums by outstanding tenor saxophonists.
2021-07-30
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Leaks Reveal Spyware Meant To Track Criminals Targeted Activists Instead

'Washington Post' reporter Craig Timberg explains how military-grade spyware licensed to governments and police departments has infiltrated the iPhones of journalists, activists and others. "It takes a story like this to help people understand how deeply enmeshed these tiny little computers have gotten into our lives," Timberg says. "I still carry my iPhone everywhere I go ... And the reality of that is that every time I do that, I'm exposing not just myself, but everyone I deal with to the possibility of spying by governments all over the world."

Also, Justin Chang reviews 'The Green Knight' starring Dev Patel.
2021-07-29
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'Moonlight' Writer Tarell Alvin McCraney

After winning an Oscar for co-writing the film 'Moonlight,' McCraney says he received a lot of opportunities, many of which he turned down. "Some of it had to do with waiting for the other shoe to drop," he says. He's now the creator of the TV series 'David Makes Man,' which is in its second season on OWN. The series begins with a Miami boy whose mother struggles with addiction ? and has echoes of McCraney's own childhood.
2021-07-28
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Public Health Expert Dr. Leana Wen On COVID & Mandates

Dr. Wen is an emergency physician, CNN Health Analyst and former Baltimore Health Commissioner. We talk about mask and vaccine mandates, the return to school and work, and the Delta variant. "Unfortunately, we're in a situation now where the vaccinated are having to pay the price for the actions of the unvaccinated," she says. Wen emigrated from China as a child and relied on the public health system while she had severe asthma. She has a new memoir called 'Lifelines.'

Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel 'Wayward' by Dana Spiotta.
2021-07-27
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Jad Abumrad

Abumrad is the creator of the hit public radio series RadioLab. The show started off as a series about science-related mysteries, but now it investigates all kinds of stories. The new RadioLab miniseries, 'The Vanishing of Harry Pace,' is about the man who co-founded a publication with WEB DuBois, co-wrote St. Louis Blues with WC Handy, founded the first Black-owned record company, helped desegregate a Chicago neighborhood ? and then kind of disappeared. Abumrad also co-reported the podcast miniseries 'Dolly Parton's America,' which uses her life and music to examine larger issues like America's cultural divide.
2021-07-26
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Best Of: Questlove / Growing Up In A Utopian Community

Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson talks about directing the new film 'Summer of Soul,' documenting the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival. It features performances by Nina Simone, Stevie Wonder, Mahalia Jackson and more, and reflects on the cultural and political changes of the time. We'll also talk about big changes in Questlove's life.

Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead remembers electric guitarists George Barnes and Mary Osborne, who were born 100 years ago.

Writer Akash Kapur reflects on growing up in a Utopian community founded in India 1968. While living in the U.S., he connected with a woman who also grew up in that community. They married and returned there, to better understand the social tumult of their childhood, and to learn more about the mysterious circumstances surrounding her parents' deaths. His book is 'Better to Have Gone.'
2021-07-24
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Hugh Grant On 'The Undoing'

Hugh Grant has been nominated for an Emmy for his role in the HBO miniseries 'The Undoing,' in which he played an adulterous doctor suspected of murder. Grant got his start in romcoms, but lately he's been getting darker roles. "It's alarming how many pretty unpleasant narcissists I've played or been offered in the last six or seven years. But It's certainly been a blessed relief after having to be Mr. Nice Guy for so many years," he says.

Ken Tucker reviews two new albums from Australia and David Bianculli reviews the second season of 'Ted Lasso' on Apple TV+.
2021-07-23
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How GOP State Legislatures Are Remaking The U.S.

Journalist Ron Brownstein says Republican-controlled state legislatures are taking a sharp right turn, in a conscious backlash against unified Democratic control of Congress. These states are not only passing voting rights restrictions, they're passing a torrent of other conservative bills that reflect the cultural and racial priorities of Trump's base. Brownstein is a senior editor at 'The Atlantic' and a senior political analyst at CNN. His latest book is called 'Rock Me on the Water: 1974 - The Year Los Angeles Transformed Movies, Music, Television and Politics.'

Justin Chang reviews the South Korean film 'The Woman Who Ran.'
2021-07-22
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Questlove On 'Summer of Soul'

Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson is coming out of the pandemic a changed man. The co-founder of the Roots and the music director for 'The Tonight Show' did something he never thought he'd do ? he bought a farm in upstate New York. "I thought chaos was the only way that I could exist. But now I embrace quiet and I can hear myself think." Now he's venturing into a new arena: He's made his directorial debut with the documentary 'Summer of Soul,' which tells the story of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, known as the "Black Woodstock."
2021-07-21
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Reopening The Jeffrey Epstein Investigation

Long after Jeffrey Epstein got a lenient sentence for sexual abuse of minors, 'Miami Herald' reporter Julie K. Brown identified 80 women who said they survived his abuse. "There is nothing that was more powerful than the words of the women talking about this themselves," she says. Her book is 'Perversion of Justice.'
2021-07-20
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Growing Up In A Utopian Community

Memoirist Akash Kapur was raised in an intentional community in India, then moved to the U.S. at age 16. He's seen the idealism of people trying to remake human society and renounce materialism. He's also seen how idealism and spirituality can turn into zealotry--and how individuals can become victims of their own search for perfection. Kapur writes about the reality of utopian communities in 'Better to Have Gone: Love, Death, and the Quest for Utopia in Auroville.'

Kevin Whitehead reviews a new Bill Evans anthology.
2021-07-19
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Best Of: 'Startup Wife' Author Tahmima Anam / MLB Pitcher C.C. Sabathia

Tahmima Anam's new novel is about a married couple, Cyrus and Asha, who found a social media platform that customizes ceremonies and rituals for people who aren't religious. The platform's success turns the husband into a messiah figure ? even though it was his wife who designed it. We talk with Amam about how her real life boardroom experience helped inspire the novel.

TV critic David Bianculli reviews the comedy series 'Schmigadoon!'

Six-time All Star C.C. Sabathia pitched for the Yankees and the Indians over the course of his 19-year career. He also struggled with alcoholism. Sabathia reflects on baseball and sobriety in the memoir, 'Till the End.'
2021-07-17
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Anthony Bourdain, 'Roadrunner'

We revisit our 2016 interview with culinary icon Anthony Bourdain. He hosted the CNN series 'Parts Unknown' which took audiences to countries all over the world. He spoke with 'Fresh Air' about his breakout book, 'Kitchen Confidential,' and why he didn't think of himself as a journalist. Bourdain died in 2018 by suicide while filming in France. 'Roadrunner,' a new documentary about his life and tragic death, is now in theaters.

TV critic David Bianculli reviews 'Schmigadoon!' starring Cecily Strong of 'SNL.'
2021-07-16
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Our Renewable Energy Future

'New York Times' reporter Ivan Penn unpacks the debate over infrastructure: Do we go big and fund huge wind and solar farms with new transmission lines, or go local, with rooftop solar panels, batteries and micro-grids?

Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews a reprint of Gloria Naylor's landmark novel, 'The Women of Brewster Place.'
2021-07-15
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MLB Pitcher C.C. Sabathia

The six-time All Star pitched for the Yankees and the Indians over the course of his 19-year career. He also struggled with alcoholism. Sabathia reflects on baseball and sobriety in the memoir, 'Till the End.'

Justin Chang shares his favorite picks from the Cannes Film Festival, which he screened from L.A. Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead celebrates the centennial of two early electric guitarists, George Barnes and Mary Osborne.
2021-07-14
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The 'Ugly Truth' About Facebook

In their new book, 'New York Times' reporters Cecilia Kang and Sheera Frenkel examine the problems Facebook created and the problems it's facing. We talk about disinformation, hate speech, and how CEO Mark Zuckerberg knew the "Stop the Steal" private groups were planning a riot on the capitol but decided against warning the president. "Facebook knew the potential for explosive violence was very real [on Jan 6]," Kang says.
2021-07-13
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'Startup Wife' Author Satirizes Tech Culture & Sexism

Tahmima Anam's new novel is about a married couple, Cyrus and Asha, who found a tech startup. It's a social media platform that customizes ceremonies and rituals for people who aren't religious. The platform's success turns the husband into a messiah figure ? even though it was his wife who designed it. We talk with Amam about how her real life boardroom experience helped inspire the novel, the allure of rituals, and her childhood growing up in many different countries.
2021-07-12
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Best Of: Writer Ashley C. Ford / Flight Attendant-Turned-Author T.J. Newman

Ashley C. Ford's father was incarcerated when she was too young to remember, and she was 30 when he got out. For many of those years, no one told her what his crime was. When she was in her teens, not longer after she'd been raped by a boyfriend, she was shocked to learn her father had been convicted of rape. Her memoir is 'Somebody's Daughter.'

Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a newly released recording of a 1969 Sarah Vaughan concert.

Also, we'll hear from former flight attendant T.J. Newman. Her 10 years working crowded cabins informed her debut novel, 'Falling.' It's a thriller about a flight from LA to New York, in which the pilot learns a terrorist plans to kill his family unless he crashes his plane.
2021-07-10
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Mindy Kaling On 'Never Have I Ever'

Kaling's Netflix show, 'Never Have I Ever,' is based on her own experiences as a nerdy, confident teen who pined for a boyfriend. The second season drops next week. She spoke with Terry Gross in 2020 about the series, how being a diversity hire at 'The Office' inspired her movie 'Late Night,' and how the grief of losing a parent has impacted her as a mother.

TV critic David Bianculli reviews the music documentaries 'Summer of Soul' and 'McCartney 3-2-1.'
2021-07-09
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Freeing An Innocent Man From Prison

When Yutico Briley was 19 years old, he was sentenced to 60 years in prison for an armed robbery he said he didn't commit. After serving 7 years of his sentence, Briley heard criminal justice reporter Emily Bazelon on 'Fresh Air' and wrote to her about his case. Bazelon started corresponding with him and doing some research, and found flaws in his defense and trial representative of larger problems in the justice system. Her sister Lara Bazelon, a lawyer, decided to take Briley's case and file for an appeal. Lara won the appeal and his exoneration. Emily Bazelon's article about Briley is the cover story of this week's 'New York Times Magazine.' We'll hear from Emily Bazelon and Yutico Briley.
2021-07-08
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Sex & Censorship In The Gilded Age

The Comstock Act, which passed in 1873, virtually outlawed contraception. In 'The Man Who Hated Women,' author Amy Sohn writes about the man behind the law ? and the women prosecuted under it.

John Powers reviews the detective drama 'Unforgotten' on PBS.
2021-07-07
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Former Flight Attendant Shares Stories From The Sky

T.J. Newman's new book, 'Falling,' is a thriller about a hijacking on a commercial flight. The pilot is told he must crash the plane or his family on the ground will be killed. We talk with Newman about her book and about her 10 years in the skies ? from pet peeves to scary situations. "If all you see us do is a beverage service, that's a great day at work because that means that we're not actually doing our job, because we have training in everything from hazmat to hijackings to medical situations to turbulence to mechanical issues," she says.

Also, podcast critic Nick Quah reviews Audible's comedy fiction podcast 'Hot White Heist,' starring SNL's Bowen Yang.
2021-07-06
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Bandleader Jon Batiste

Batiste is the bandleader of 'The Late Show with Stephen Colbert.' He joins us from his home piano where he plays music he wrote for the Pixar movie 'Soul' and songs from his album 'We Are.' We'll also hear his rendition of 'The Star Spangled Banner' and the Black national anthem, "Lift Every Voice."
2021-07-05
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Best Of: Uzo Aduba / Desus & Mero

Uzo Aduba's breakout role was as Suzanne "Crazy Eyes" Warren in the Netflix series about a women's prison, 'Orange is the New Black.' Now she stars in the HBO reboot of 'In Treatment,' as therapist Dr. Brooke Taylor. We'll talk about the 180 degree change between the two roles.

Ken Tucker reviews new albums by Chrissie Hynde singing Dylan songs and Shannon McNally doing songs associated with Waylon Jennings.

Desus Nice and The Kid Mero started out doing comedy together on Twitter, then created the 'Bodega Boys' podcast. Their comedy series on Showtime is now in its third season. We talk about growing up in the Bronx in the '80s and '90s, graffiti, hip-hop and the odd jobs that shaped them.
2021-07-03
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Bruce Springsteen Returns To Broadway

"The Boss" spoke with Terry Gross at his New Jersey home studio in 2016 about masculinity, depression, and wishing he was his stage persona. His one-man show, 'Springsteen on Broadway,' returned to Broadway this week.

Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews Steven Soderbergh's 'No Sudden Move,' starring Don Cheadle and Benicio del Toro.
2021-07-02
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How A Former Spy Trained Conservatives To Infiltrate Progressive Groups

'NYT' reporter Adam Goldman describes an undercover effort, led by an avid Trump supporter, that trained conservatives in espionage techniques and sent them to dig up dirt on progressives. Some operations were aimed at discrediting perceived enemies of Trump when he was president, including his national security advisor, H.R. McMaster.

Also rock critic Ken Tucker reviews new songs by veteran artists Tom Jones, Jackson Browne and John Mayer.
2021-07-01
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Global Sanitation & Transforming The Toilet

The United Nations estimates that 4.2 billion people ? more than half of the world's population ? live without any access to safely managed sanitation. No septic systems. No waste treatment plants. In 'Pipe Dreams,' Chelsea Wald examines the health issues related to sanitation and looks at global efforts to manage human waste, including turning it into fuel and fertilizer.

Also, John Powers reviews the novel 'The Netanyahus,' by Joshua Cohen, and Kevin Whitehead reviews a newly released 1969 concert recording by Sarah Vaughan.
2021-06-30
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Watergate, The Tapes & The Fall Of The Nixon White House

Historian and author Michael Dobbs reconstructs how the scandal gradually engulfed more administration officials, with operatives turning on each other ? and eventually the president. We'll talk about what led to Nixon's downfall and why there are more tapes of Nixon than of any other president. Dobbs' book is 'King Richard.'

Also, TV critic David Bianculli shares his thoughts on Conan O'Brien's farewell to his late night show, as he moves to HBO Max for a variety show.
2021-06-30
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Uzo Aduba

Aduba's breakout role was as Suzanne "Crazy Eyes" Warren in the Netflix series about a women's prison, 'Orange is the New Black.' Now she stars in the HBO reboot of 'In Treatment,' as therapist Dr. Brooke Taylor. We talk about the 180 degree change between the two roles, colorism in Hollywood, and the significance of her full Nigerian name ? Uzoamaka Nwanneka Aduba.
2021-06-28
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Best Of: Anthony Ramos / Renée Elise Goldsberry

Anthony Ramos says Lin-Manuel Miranda's Broadway musical 'In the Heights' filled him with hope about a life on the stage: "I felt like I'm watching my cousins and my aunts and uncles on the stage ... like friends that I grew up with. And these people are speaking vernacular that's familiar to me." Now he's starring ? and singing and dancing and rapping ? in the film adaptation. We also talk about his roles in 'Hamilton' and his childhood.

Justin Chang reviews 'Luca' and 'Undine.'

The comedy series 'Girls5Eva,' which was just renewed for a second season, follows a 1990s band that reunites after a long stretch of obscurity. Renée Elise Goldsberry was once in a girl group herself. She spoke with Ann Marie Baldonado about women being pitted against each other in showbiz and her show-stopping song "Satisfied" in 'Hamilton.'
2021-06-26
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The Early Years Of The CIA

In his book, 'The Quiet Americans,' author Scott Anderson profiles four daring and resourceful soldiers who became intelligence agents after World War II, when America was strong and respected after defeating Nazi Germany. The CIA then embarked on hundreds of ill-considered covert operations in Eastern Europe, and its obsession with fighting Communism propelled it into the subversion of several democratically-elected governments around the world.

David Bianculli reviews the new seasons of 'Evil' and 'The Good Fight.'
2021-06-25
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The Battle Over Teaching Critical Race Theory

An NBC News analysis finds at least 165 local and national groups are trying to disrupt or block lessons on critical race theory. NBC reporter Tyler Kingkade explores who is waging this fight, and why. "Opponents are using critical race theory as really more of a catchall to include anything teaching students about systemic racism, any mention of white privilege, and really the definition that they're using has expanded to include anything related to equity, diversity and inclusion," he says.

Also, critic Kevin Whitehead reviews the last albums from bassist Mario Pavone, which he recorded near the end of his life.
2021-06-24
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Megan Rapinoe

The USWNT soccer star and activist spoke with Terry Gross last year about her World Cup wins, being one of the first openly gay players on the national team, and taking a knee in solidarity with Black Lives Matter ? and the repercussions she faced. The team's ongoing fight for equal pay is the subject of a new HBO Max documentary called 'LFG.'

Ken Tucker reviews two cover albums, one by Chrissie Hynde of Bob Dylan songs, and one by Shannon McNally of Waylon Jennings songs.
2021-06-23
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Renée Elise Goldsberry On 'Girls5Eva' & 'Hamilton'

The comedy series 'Girls5Eva,' which was just renewed for a second season, follows a 1990s band that reunites after a long stretch of obscurity. Goldsberry was once in a girl group herself. She spoke with Ann Marie Baldonado about women being pitted against each other in showbiz, her show-stopping song "Satisfied" in 'Hamilton,' and what she learned from her time on a soap opera.

Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews Francis Spufford's novel, 'Light Perpetual.'
2021-06-22
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Desus & Mero

Desus Nice and The Kid Mero started out doing comedy together on Twitter, then created the 'Bodega Boys' podcast. Their comedy series on Showtime is now in its third season. We talk about growing up in the Bronx in the '80s and '90s, graffiti, hip-hop and the odd jobs that shaped them.

Also, Justin Chang reviews the Pixar film 'Luca' and the German film 'Undine.'
2021-06-21
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Best Of: Julie Lythcott-Haims / How Junk Food Companies Get Us 'Hooked'

Former Stanford University undergraduate dean Julie Lythcott-Haims' memoir, 'Real American,' is the story of her coming to terms with her racial identity. Her father was a successful Black physician, her mother a white British woman. She recalls stories from her childhood, and the racist messaging she received. "I knew by 7 that something was wrong with Blackness."

Kevin Whitehead reviews the album 'Minor Swing,' by Vincent Herring.

Journalist Michael Moss says processed foods can be as addictive as cocaine, heroin and cigarettes. In his new book, 'Hooked,' Moss explores how these companies appeal to our senses, nostalgia and brain chemistry to keep us snacking.
2021-06-19
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The 50th Anniversary Of The Pentagon Papers

Fifty years ago this week, 'The New York Times' published the first in a series of articles based on a classified Defense Department study that was leaked to the paper by Daniel Ellsberg. This study came to be known as the Pentagon Papers. It chronicled decades of failed U.S. policy in Vietnam, and the ways the American public was misled in how the war was conducted. We listen back to archival interviews with Ellsberg and Ben Bradlee of 'The Washington Post,' who ran their own series on the documents.

Later, we remember actor Ned Beatty, who died this week and critic David Bianculli reviews the Apple TV+ series 'Physical,' starring Rose Byrne.
2021-06-18
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Questions Surrounding The COVID-19 Lab-Leak Theory

What are the credible questions related to the theory that COVID-19 leaked from a lab in Wuhan, China? President Biden has asked the intelligence community to investigate, but 'Vanity Fair' reporter Katherine Eban says there have been many roadblocks.
2021-06-17
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Challenging The Myths Of The Alamo

Remember the Alamo? According to Texas lore, it's the site in San Antonio where, in 1836, about 180 Texan rebels died defending the state during Texas' war for independence from Mexico. But in a new book, Bryan Burrough (along with co-writers Chris Tomlinson and Jason Stanford) challenge the historical lore of the Alamo ? including the story that Davy Crockett refused to surrender. "Most academics now believe, based on Mexican accounts and contemporary accounts, that, in fact, [Crockett] did surrender and was executed," Burrough says. His book is 'Forget the Alamo.'

Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Republic of Detours' by Scott Borchert.
2021-06-16
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Writer Ashley C. Ford On Her Memoir 'Somebody's Daughter'

For most of Ashley C. Ford's life, her father was incarcerated for rape. This was especially traumatizing for Ford, as she herself is a survivor of sexual assault. Her new bestselling memoir 'Somebody's Daughter' details her evolving relationship with her father and her own body. "I'm in love with my humanity. I love being a human. I do," she says. "The range of emotions is terrifying and beautiful. The range of actions are terrifying and beautiful that a human can experience, and some of my experiences suck really, really bad. A lot of them are fantastic."

Also John Powers reviews the second season of the Netflix series 'Lupin.'
2021-06-15
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Anthony Ramos On 'In The Heights' & 'Hamilton'

Anthony Ramos says Lin-Manuel Miranda's Broadway musical 'In the Heights' filled him with hope about a life on the stage: "I felt like I'm watching my cousins and my aunts and uncles on the stage ... like friends that I grew up with. And these people are speaking vernacular that's familiar to me." Now he's starring ? and singing and dancing and rapping ? in the film adaptation. We also talk about his roles in 'Hamilton,' his childhood, and his Calvin Klein ads.
2021-06-14
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Best Of: Rita Moreno / Daisy Hernández

Rita Moreno moved to the U.S. mainland from Puerto Rico as a child. She says her 'West Side Story' role is "the only part I ever remember where I represented Hispanics in a dignified and positive way." Moreno is an EGOT, a winner of an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony.

Film critic Justin Chang reviews the film adaptation of the musical 'In the Heights.'

Also, we'll talk with Daisy Hernández, author of 'The Kissing Bug: The True Story of a Family, an Insect and a Nation's Neglect of a Deadly Disease.' It's part medical history, part personal history about growing in an immigrant family, including her aunt who had the disease.
2021-06-12
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Catching Up With Stephen Colbert / Remembering Clarence Williams III

We remember actor Clarence Williams III, best known for playing Linc Hayes, one of three hippie undercover cops on the TV series 'The Mod Squad' from 1968 to 1973.

Also, Stephen Colbert begins taping the 'The Late Show' in front of a live audience again on Monday. We hear his interview with Terry about doing the show from home taping during the pandemic. "I got into show business in a way to not be alone. Like a lot of comedians, I'm a bit of a broken toy," Colbert says.

And Justin Chang reviews the new film adaptation of Lin-Manuel Miranda's musical 'In the Heights.'
2021-06-11
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Inside The Ransomware Industry

New York Times investigative reporter Michael Schwirtz gained access to the dashboard of DarkSide, a ransomware operation that's pulled in more than $90 million since it began last August. Schwirtz talks about DarkSide's business model, its customer support system to help the hackers it enables, and help the victims learn how to use Bitcoin to pay the ransom.
2021-06-10
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The Space Race & The Dangerous Early Days Of NASA

On the morning of Feb. 20, 1962, about 100,000 spectators gathered in Cape Canaveral, Fla., to witness the launch of the Friendship 7, the United States' first mission to put an astronaut in orbit around the Earth. Historian Jeff Shesol says there was real fear that astronaut John Glenn wouldn't survive the day. We talk with Shesol about the early days of NASA, and how the Cold War pushed the U.S. space program to its limits. His book is 'Mercury Rising.'

David Bianculli reviews the Disney+ series 'Loki' starring Tom Hiddleston.
2021-06-09
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Race, Sexuality & The Deadly 'Kissing Bug'

When Daisy Hernández was 5, her aunt in Colombia came down with a mysterious illness that caused her large intestine to swell. Hernandez details her aunt's story ? and her own ? in a new memoir.
2021-06-08
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Rita Moreno

Moreno moved to the U.S. mainland from Puerto Rico as a child. She says her 'West Side Story' role is "the only part I ever remember where I represented Hispanics in a dignified and positive way." We talk about some of the racism and sexism she experienced in Hollywood, her relationship with Marlon Brando, and why she's happier than ever now at 89 years old. Moreno is an EGOT, a winner of an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony.
2021-06-07
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Best Of: Exonerated 5 Member / Reckoning With The Legacy Of Slavery

In 1990, Yusef Salaam was one of the five boys wrongly convicted in the so-called Central Park jogger case. Salaam spent nearly seven years behind bars and wasn't exonerated until 2002, when a serial rapist confessed to the crime. Salaam tells his story in his memoir 'Better, Not Bitter.'

Also, Kevin Whitehead reviews 'Black to the Future' by Shabaka Hutchings and the Sons of Kemet.

In 'How the Word is Passed,' writer and poet Clint Smith visits eight places central to the history of slavery in America, including Thomas Jefferson's Monticello plantation and Louisiana's Angola prison. "This history that we are told was so long ago wasn't, in fact, that long ago at all," he says.
2021-06-05
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Producing The Philly Sound

We hear from songwriter, arranger and producer Thom Bell. This year marks the 50th anniversary of Philadelphia International Records. Among the songs he arranged were Joe Simon's "Drowning in the Sea of Love," and "Back Stabbers" by The O'Jays. Bell is in the Songwriters Hall of Fame. He also wrote and arranged for The Stylistics, The Spinners, and The Delfonics. He spoke with Terry Gross in 2006.

Also, Justin Chang reviews the horror movie 'A Quiet Place Part II,' the sequel to John Krasinski's 2018 film.
2021-06-04
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How Russia Used An Overt Agent To Attack Biden In The 2020 Election

'Time' investigative correspondent Simon Shuster says that Andriy Derkach, a seven-term member of the Ukrainian parliament, and widely believed to be a Russian agent, gave misleading information to Rudy Giuliani to discredit Biden during the 2020 campaign. Derkach and Giuliani are both under investigation by federal prosecutors in the U.S.
2021-06-03
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