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On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

Groundbreaking Peabody Award-winning conversation about the big questions of meaning ? spiritual inquiry, science, social healing, and the arts. Each week a new discovery about the immensity of our lives. Hosted by Krista Tippett. New conversations every Thursday, with occasional extras.

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Episodes

Vincent Harding ? Is America Possible?

Vincent Harding was wise about how the vision of the civil rights movement might speak to 21st-century realities. He reminded us that the movement of the ?50s and ?60s was spiritually as well as politically vigorous; it aspired to a ?beloved community,? not merely a tolerant integrated society. He pursued this through patient-yet-passionate cross-cultural, cross-generational relationships. And he posed and lived a question that is freshly in our midst: Is America possible?

Vincent Harding was chairperson of the Veterans of Hope Project at the Iliff School of Theology in Denver. He authored the magnificent book Hope and History: Why We Must Share the Story of the Movement and the essay ?Is America Possible?? He died in 2014.

This show originally aired in February 2011.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org

2020-07-02
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[Unedited] Vincent Harding with Krista Tippett

Vincent Harding was wise about how the vision of the civil rights movement might speak to 21st-century realities. He reminded us that the movement of the ?50s and ?60s was spiritually as well as politically vigorous; it aspired to a ?beloved community,? not merely a tolerant integrated society. He pursued this through patient-yet-passionate cross-cultural, cross-generational relationships. And he posed and lived a question that is freshly in our midst: Is America possible?

Vincent Harding was chairperson of the Veterans of Hope Project at the Iliff School of Theology in Denver. He authored the magnificent book Hope and History: Why We Must Share the Story of the Movement and the essay ?Is America Possible?? He died in 2014.

This show originally aired in February 2011.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Vincent Harding ? Is America Possible?" Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-07-02
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Jason Reynolds ? Fortifying Imagination

Books that fortify the young also have a power to help heal adults; so, too, does this conversation with writer Jason Reynolds. He is the National Ambassador for Young People?s Literature of the Library of Congress and author of a new companion to Ibram X. Kendi?s history of racism, Stamped From the Beginning, for young readers.

Jason Reynolds was appointed National Ambassador for Young People?s Literature by the Library of Congress in January 2020. His many award-winning books include Ghost, Long Way Down, and Look Both Ways. His most recent book is Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org

2020-06-25
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[Unedited] Jason Reynolds with Krista Tippett

Books that fortify the young also have a power to help heal adults; so, too, does this conversation with writer Jason Reynolds. He is the National Ambassador for Young People?s Literature of the Library of Congress and author of a new companion to Ibram X. Kendi?s history of racism, Stamped From the Beginning, for young readers.

Jason Reynolds was appointed National Ambassador for Young People?s Literature by the Library of Congress in January 2020. His many award-winning books include Ghost, Long Way Down, and Look Both Ways. His most recent book is Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Jason Reynolds ? Fortifying Imagination." Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-06-25
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Isabel Wilkerson ? This History is Long; This History Is Deep

Go to the doctor and they won?t begin to treat you without taking your history ? and not just yours, but that of your parents and grandparents before you. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Isabel Wilkerson points this out as she reflects on her epic work of narrative nonfiction, The Warmth of Other Suns. She?s immersed herself in the stories of the Great Migration, the movement of six million African Americans to northern U.S. cities in the 20th century. The book is a carrier of histories and truths that help make sense of human and social challenges at the heart of our life together now.

Isabel Wilkerson won the Pulitzer Prize for her work as Chicago bureau chief of The New York Times and was awarded the National Humanities Medal by President Barack Obama in 2016 ?for championing the stories of an unsung history.? Her book The Warmth of Other Suns won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction. Her new book, Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents, comes out in August 2020.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org

This show originally aired in November, 2016.

2020-06-18
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[Unedited] Isabel Wilkerson with Krista Tippett

Go to the doctor and they won?t begin to treat you without taking your history ? and not just yours, but that of your parents and grandparents before you. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Isabel Wilkerson points this out as she reflects on her epic work of narrative nonfiction, The Warmth of Other Suns. She?s immersed herself in the stories of the Great Migration, the movement of six million African Americans to northern U.S. cities in the 20th century. The book is a carrier of histories and truths that help make sense of human and social challenges at the heart of our life together now.

Isabel Wilkerson won the Pulitzer Prize for her work as Chicago bureau chief of The New York Times and was awarded the National Humanities Medal by President Barack Obama in 2016 ?for championing the stories of an unsung history.? Her book The Warmth of Other Suns won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction. Her new book, Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents, comes out in August 2020.

This show originally aired in November, 2016.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Isabel Wilkerson ? This History is Long; This History Is Deep." Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-06-18
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Eula Biss ? Talking About Whiteness

You can?t think about something if you can?t talk about it, says Eula Biss. The writer helpfully opens up lived words and ideas like complacence, guilt, and opportunity hoarding for an urgent reckoning with whiteness. This conversation was inspired by her 2015 essay in the New York Times, ?White Debt.?

Eula Biss teaches writing at Northwestern University. Her books include On Immunity: An Inoculation and Notes from No Man's Land: American Essays.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org 
This show originally aired in January, 2017.

2020-06-11
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[Unedited] Eula Biss with Krista Tippett

You can?t think about something if you can?t talk about it, says Eula Biss. The writer helpfully opens up lived words and ideas like complacence, guilt, and opportunity hoarding for an urgent reckoning with whiteness. This conversation was inspired by her 2015 essay in the New York Times, ?White Debt.?

Eula Biss teaches writing at Northwestern University. Her books include On Immunity: An Inoculation and Notes from No Man's Land: American Essays

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Eula Biss ? Talking About Whiteness." Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-06-11
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Race and Healing: A Body Practice

Therapist and trauma specialist Resmaa Menakem is working with old wisdom and very new science about our bodies and nervous systems, and all we condense into the word ?race.? ?Your body ? all of our bodies ? are where changing the status quo must begin.?
Find a quiet place and experience this short, simple body practice offered in Resmaa?s conversation with Krista on the On Being episode, ?Notice the Rage; Notice the Silence.?

2020-06-09
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Living the Questions: When no question seems big enough

With our colleague Rev. Lucas Johnson, Krista talks through the question of what questions matter for this moment. Can anyone use the word ?we??  And how to begin walking forward?

Living the Questions is an occasional  On Being segment where Krista muses on questions from our listening community. Submit your own at [email protected]

Krista Tippett created and leads The On Being Project and hosts the On Being radio show and podcast. She?s a National Humanities Medalist, and the New York Times bestselling author of Becoming Wise: An Inquiry into the Mystery and Art of Living. Read her full bio here.

Lucas Johnson leads The On Being Project's work in social healing as Executive Director of Civil Conversations and Social Healing. He is a community organizer, writer, and a minister in the American Baptist Churches.

2020-06-05
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Resmaa Menakem ? ?Notice the Rage; Notice the Silence?

The best laws and diversity training have not gotten us anywhere near where we want to go. Therapist and trauma specialist Resmaa Menakem is working with old wisdom and very new science about our bodies and nervous systems, and all we condense into the word ?race.? Krista sat down with him in Minneapolis, where they both live and work, before the pandemic lockdown began. In this heartbreaking moment, after the killing of George Floyd and the history it carries, Resmaa Menakem?s practices offer us the beginning to change at a cellular level.

Resmaa Menakem offers therapy and coaching in Minneapolis and teaches across the U.S. He?s worked with U.S. military contractors in Afghanistan as well as American communities and police forces. His latest book, My Grandmother?s Hands: Racialized Trauma and the Pathway to Mending Our Hearts and Bodies, is part narrative, part workbook.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org

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2020-06-04
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[Unedited] Resmaa Menakem with Krista Tippett

The best laws and diversity training have not gotten us anywhere near where we want to go. Therapist and trauma specialist Resmaa Menakem is working with old wisdom and very new science about our bodies and nervous systems, and all we condense into the word ?race.? Krista sat down with him in Minneapolis, where they both live and work, before the pandemic lockdown began. In this heartbreaking moment, after the killing of George Floyd and the history it carries, Resmaa Menakem?s practices offer us the beginning to change at a cellular level.

Resmaa Menakem offers therapy and coaching in Minneapolis and teaches across the U.S. He?s worked with U.S. military contractors in Afghanistan as well as American communities and police forces. His latest book, My Grandmother?s Hands: Racialized Trauma and the Pathway to Mending Our Hearts and Bodies, is part narrative, part workbook.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode ?Resmaa Menakem ? ?Notice the Rage; Notice the Silence??. Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-06-04
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Gregory Orr ? Shaping Grief With Language

We often explore on this show the places in the human experience where ordinary language falls short. The poet Gregory Orr has wrested gentle, healing, life-giving words from extreme grief and trauma. And right now we are all carrying some magnitude of grief in our bodies.

Gregory Orr is the author of two books about poetry, Poetry as Survival and A Primer for Poets and Readers of Poetry, a memoir, The Blessing, and twelve collections of poetry, including How Beautiful the Beloved and The Last Love Poem I Will Ever Write. He taught at the University of Virginia from 1975 to 2019, where he founded the university?s Master of Fine Arts program in creative writing.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org

This show originally aired in May, 2019.

2020-05-28
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[Unedited] Gregory Orr with Krista Tippett

We often explore on this show the places in the human experience where ordinary language falls short. The poet Gregory Orr has wrested gentle, healing, life-giving words from extreme grief and trauma. And right now we are all carrying some magnitude of grief in our bodies.

Gregory Orr is the author of two books about poetry, Poetry as Survival and A Primer for Poets and Readers of Poetry, a memoir, The Blessing, and twelve collections of poetry, including How Beautiful the Beloved and The Last Love Poem I Will Ever Write. He taught at the University of Virginia from 1975 to 2019, where he founded the university?s Master of Fine Arts program in creative writing.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Gregory Orr ? Shaping Grief With Language." Find more at onbeing.org.

This show originally aired in May, 2019.

2020-05-28
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Jacqueline Novogratz ? Towards a Moral Revolution

Moral reckonings are being driven to the surface of our life together: What are politics for? What is an economy for? Jacqueline Novogratz says the simplistic ways we take up such questions ? if we take them up at all ? is inadequate. Novogratz is an innovator in creative, human-centered capitalism. She has described her recent book, Manifesto for a Moral Revolution, as a love letter to the next generation.

Jacqueline Novogratz is the founder and CEO of Acumen, a venture capital fund that serves some of the poorest people in the world. She?s also the author of a memoir, The Blue Sweater: Bridging the Gap between Rich and Poor in an Interconnected World.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org

2020-05-21
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[Unedited] Jacqueline Novogratz with Krista Tippett 2020

Moral reckonings are being driven to the surface of our life together: What are politics for? What is an economy for? Jacqueline Novogratz says the simplistic ways we take up such questions ? if we take them up at all ? is inadequate. Novogratz is an innovator in creative, human-centered capitalism. She has described her recent book, Manifesto for a Moral Revolution, as a love letter to the next generation.

Jacqueline Novogratz is the founder and CEO of Acumen, a venture capital fund that serves some of the poorest people in the world. She?s also the author of a memoir, The Blue Sweater: Bridging the Gap between Rich and Poor in an Interconnected World.

2020-05-21
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Samar Jarrah, Wajahat Ali, Sahar Ullah, et al. ? Revealing Ramadan

This year Muslims are experiencing a Ramadan like no other. The month is usually a period of both intimacy and great community. Now Muslims are improvising, as in many places the rituals of Ramadan must be experienced at home or online. This show, recorded in 2009, grew out of an invitation to Muslim listeners to reflect on what it means to be part of what often is referred to in the abstract as ?the Muslim world.? We received responses from all over the world and were struck by the vivid stories about Ramadan itself, across a remarkable spectrum of life and spiritual sensibility.

Sixteen Muslims, in their own words, speak about the delights and gravity of Islam?s holiest month.

GUEST BIO
Allee Ramadhan is a retired federal prosecutor and the father of 11 children. He lives in Maryland.

Ilana Alazzeh is a multimedia artist, photographer, and activist. She is the founder of several interfaith, diversity, and economic justice groups, including Muslims Against Homophobia and LGBT Hate.

Nadia Sheikh Bandukda is an attorney specializing in labor and employment issues.

Nicole Queen is a photographer living in Dallas. She co-hosts the podcast, Salam, Girl!

Sabiha Shariff lives in Dallas, where she volunteers with the Texas Muslim Women?s Foundation.

Steven Longden is a Mancunian who converted to Islam in 1993.

Samar Jarrah is an author, journalist, and co-host of ?True Talk?, a global affairs talk show on WMNF in Tampa. She grew up in Kuwait.

Wajahat Ali is a New York Times contributing op-ed writer, a playwright, an attorney, a public speaker, and a first-generation Pakistani American. 

Yanina Vaschenko emigrated from Russia to Dallas when she was eight years old. She is a bilingual elementary school teacher. She grew up in the Russian Orthodox Church.

Maria Romero is Mexican American, an attorney working in legal services, and a mother. She lives in Seattle.

Ibrahim Al-Marashi is an associate professor of History at California State University in San Marcos. He has also taught in Turkey and Spain.

Sahar Ullah is an artist and academic. She?s a lecturer in Literature Humanities at Columbia University and the founder of the theater project, Hijabi Monologues.

Mary Hope Schwoebel is a former senior program officer in the Academy for International Conflict Management and Peacebuilding at the United States Institute of Peace. She is an associate professor of Conflict Resolution Studies at NOVA Southeastern University.

Adnan Onart is a poet. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where he is an active Muslim member of a Unitarian Universalist congregation.

Feruze Faison grew up in Istanbul and, when we spoke with her, was teaching elementary school in New York.

Tayyaba Syed is a Pakistani American author of children?s books, including The Blessed Bananas. She is also a freelance journalist and writing coach. 

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org 

This show originally aired in September 2009.

 

2020-05-14
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Devendra Banhart ? ?When Things Fall Apart?

In this ?spiritual book club? edition of the show, Krista and musician/artist Devendra Banhart read favorite passages and discuss When Things Fall Apart, a small book of great beauty by the Tibetan Buddhist teacher Pema Chödrön. It?s a work ? like all works of spiritual genius ? that speaks from the nooks and crannies and depths of a particular tradition, while conveying truths about humanity writ large. Their conversation speaks with special force to what it means to be alive and looking for meaning right now.

Devendra Banhart is a visual artist, musician, songwriter, and poet. His albums include Ma, Mala, What Will We Be, Smokey Rolls Down Thunder Canyon, and Cripple Crow, among others. His book of poetry is Weeping Gang Bliss Void Yab-Yum.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org

2020-05-07
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[Unedited] Devendra Banhart with Krista Tippett

In this ?spiritual book club? edition of the show, Krista and musician/artist Devendra Banhart read favorite passages and discuss When Things Fall Apart, a small book of great beauty by the Tibetan Buddhist teacher Pema Chödrön. It?s a work ? like all works of spiritual genius ? that speaks from the nooks and crannies and depths of a particular tradition, while conveying truths about humanity writ large. Their conversation speaks with special force to what it means to be alive and looking for meaning right now.

Devendra Banhart is a visual artist, musician, songwriter, and poet. His albums include Ma, Mala, What Will We Be, Smokey Rolls Down Thunder Canyon, and Cripple Crow, among others. His book of poetry is Weeping Gang Bliss Void Yab-Yum.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Devendra Banhart ? ?When Things Fall Apart?." Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-05-07
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Ocean Vuong ? A Life Worthy of Our Breath

Krista interviewed the writer Ocean Vuong on March 8 in a joyful room full of podcast makers at On Air Fest in Brooklyn. None of us would have guessed that within a handful of days such an event would become unimaginable. So this conversation holds a last memory before the world shifted on its axis. More stunning is how exquisitely Ocean Vuong spoke on that day to the world we have now entered ? its heartbreak, its poetry, and its possibilities of both destroying and saving.

Ocean Vuong is an assistant professor of English in the MFA Program at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He is the author of the poetry collection Night Sky with Exit Wounds, which won the T.S. Eliot Prize and the Whiting Award; and a novel, On Earth We?re Briefly Gorgeous. He was a 2019 MacArthur Fellow.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org 

2020-04-30
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[Unedited] Ocean Vuong with Krista Tippett

Krista interviewed the writer Ocean Vuong on March 8 in a joyful room full of podcast makers at On Air Fest in Brooklyn. None of us would have guessed that within a handful of days such an event would become unimaginable. So this conversation holds a last memory before the world shifted on its axis. More stunning is how exquisitely Ocean Vuong spoke on that day to the world we have now entered ? its heartbreak, its poetry, and its possibilities of both destroying and saving.

Ocean Vuong is an assistant professor of English in the MFA Program at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He is the author of the poetry collection Night Sky with Exit Wounds, which won the T.S. Eliot Prize and the Whiting Award; and a novel, On Earth We?re Briefly Gorgeous. He was a 2019 MacArthur Fellow

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Ocean Vuong ? A Life Worthy of Our Breath." Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-04-30
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Living the Questions: How can we balance connection with disconnection?

To a question from listener Vanessa Parfett in Melbourne, Krista reflects on "Zoomzaustion" and relearning the primacy of our bodies. Also, how this helps explain poetry's rise in our midst, and can make us more whole.

Living the Questions is an occasional On Being segment where Krista muses on questions from our listening community. Submit your own at [email protected]

Krista Tippett created and leads The On Being Project, hosts the On Being radio show and podcast, and curates The Civil Conversations Project. She received the National Humanities Medal at the White House in 2014. She speaks widely and writes books including Becoming Wise: An Inquiry into the Mystery and Art of Living. Read her full bio here.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org

2020-04-28
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Stephen Batchelor ? Finding Ease in Aloneness

One of the great challenges of life is to learn to be alone peaceably, at home in oneself. And now, by way of a virus, we have been sent inside physically and emotionally, even if we?re not home on our own. We?re forced to work out the difference between isolation and loneliness or solitude. With teachers across the ages and drawing on his life from monasticism to marriage, Buddhist writer and scholar Stephen Batchelor teaches how to approach solitude as a graceful and life-giving practice.

Stephen Batchelor teaches seminars and leads meditation retreats worldwide. He?s a co-founder and faculty member of Bodhi College, which is focused on the study and practice of early Buddhism. His many books include Buddhism Without Beliefs, The Faith to Doubt, and most recently, The Art of Solitude. 

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org

2020-04-23
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[Unedited] Stephen Batchelor with Krista Tippett

One of the great challenges of life is to learn to be alone peaceably, at home in oneself. And now, by way of a virus, we have been sent inside physically and emotionally, even if we?re not home on our own. We?re forced to work out the difference between isolation and loneliness or solitude. With teachers across the ages and drawing on his life from monasticism to marriage, Buddhist writer and scholar Stephen Batchelor teaches how to approach solitude as a graceful and life-giving practice.

Stephen Batchelor teaches seminars and leads meditation retreats worldwide. He?s a co-founder and faculty member of Bodhi College, which is focused on the study and practice of early Buddhism. His many books include Buddhism Without Beliefs, The Faith to Doubt, and most recently, The Art of Solitude.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Stephen Batchelor ? Finding Ease in Aloneness." Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-04-23
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Wendell Berry and Ellen Davis ? The Art of Being Creatures

In this intimate conversation between Krista and one of her beloved teachers, we ponder the world and our place in it, through sacred text, with fresh eyes. We?re accompanied by the meditative and prophetic poetry of Wendell Berry, read for us from his home in Kentucky: ?Stay away from anything / that obscures the place it is in. / There are no unsacred places; / there are only sacred places / and desecrated places. / Accept what comes of silence."

Ellen Davis is the Amos Ragan Kearns Distinguished Professor of Bible and Practical Theology at the Duke University Divinity School in Durham, North Carolina. She?s the author of Scripture, Culture, and Agriculture: An Agrarian Reading of the Bible. 

Wendell Berry is a farmer, poet, and environmentalist who has published more than 50 books. He lives in Port Royal, Kentucky.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

This show originally aired in June, 2010

2020-04-16
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?The Peace of Wild Things? by Wendell Berry

Wendell Berry reads his poem ?The Peace of Wild Things?

Wendell Berry is a farmer, poet, and environmentalist who has published more than 40 books. He lives in Port Royal, Kentucky.

2020-04-16
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?How to Be a Poet (to remind myself)? by Wendell Berry

Wendell Berry reads his poem ?How to Be a Poet (to remind myself)?

Wendell Berry is a farmer, poet, and environmentalist who has published more than 40 books. He lives in Port Royal, Kentucky.

2020-04-16
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?Sabbaths ? 1985, I? by Wendell Berry

Wendell Berry reads his poem ?Sabbaths ? 1985, I?

Wendell Berry is a farmer, poet, and environmentalist who has published more than 40 books. He lives in Port Royal, Kentucky.

2020-04-16
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?Sabbaths ? 1979, IV? by Wendell Berry

Wendell Berry reads his poem ?Sabbaths ? 1979, IV?

Wendell Berry is a farmer, poet, and environmentalist who has published more than 40 books. He lives in Port Royal, Kentucky.

2020-04-16
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?The Man Born to Farming? by Wendell Berry

Wendell Berry reads his poem ?The Man Born to Farming?

Wendell Berry is a farmer, poet, and environmentalist who has published more than 40 books. He lives in Port Royal, Kentucky.

2020-04-16
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?The Contrariness of the Mad Farmer? by Wendell Berry

Wendell Berry reads his poem ?The Contrariness of the Mad Farmer?

Wendell Berry is a farmer, poet, and environmentalist who has published more than 40 books. He lives in Port Royal, Kentucky.

2020-04-16
Link to episode

[Unedited] Ellen Davis with Krista Tippett

In this intimate conversation between Krista and one of her beloved teachers, we ponder the world and our place in it, through sacred text, with fresh eyes. In the edited version of this conversation, we?re accompanied by the meditative and prophetic poetry of Wendell Berry, read for us from his home in Kentucky: ?Stay away from anything / that obscures the place it is in. / There are no unsacred places; / there are only sacred places / and desecrated places. / Accept what comes of silence."

Ellen Davis is the Amos Ragan Kearns Distinguished Professor of Bible and Practical Theology at the Duke University Divinity School in Durham, North Carolina. She?s the author of Scripture, Culture, and Agriculture: An Agrarian Reading of the Bible. 

Wendell Berry is a farmer, poet, and environmentalist who has published more than 50 books. He lives in Port Royal, Kentucky.

This show originally aired in June, 2010.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Wendell Berry & Ellen Davis ? The Art of Being Creatures." Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-04-16
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Living the Questions: How can I find my footing in a shifting world?

To a question from listener Elena Rivera of Colorado Springs, Krista reflects on seeing this as a collective moment of transition (which is always stressful in human life) and ponders what we might integrate into the people we become on the other side of it. ?To really, actively, accompany each other in holding that question ? that might be a spiritual calling but also a civilizational calling for this very extraordinary transition,? she says. 

Living the Questions is an occasional On Being segment where Krista muses on questions from our listening community. Submit your own at [email protected]

Krista Tippett created and leads The On Being Project, hosts the On Being radio show and podcast, and curates The Civil Conversations Project. She received the National Humanities Medal at the White House in 2014. She speaks widely and writes books including Becoming Wise: An Inquiry into the Mystery and Art of Living. Read her full bio here.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org

2020-04-14
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David Steindl-Rast ? How to Be Grateful in Every Moment (But Not for Everything)

We?re in a season of renewal in the natural world and in spiritual traditions; both Easter and Passover this year are utterly transformed. It?s drawing us back to the wisdom of Br. David Steindl-Rast, who makes useful distinctions around experiences that are life-giving and resilience-making yet can feel absurd to speak of in a moment like this. A Benedictine monk for over 60 years, Steindl-Rast was formed by 20th-century catastrophes. He calls joy ?the happiness that doesn?t depend on what happens.? And his gratefulness is not an easy gratitude or thanksgiving ? but a full-blooded, reality-based practice and choice.

Br. David Steindl-Rast is a Benedictine monk and a beloved teacher and author on the subject of gratitude. He?s the founder and senior advisor for A Network for Grateful Living. His books include Gratefulness, The Heart of Prayer: An Approach to Life in Fullness, A Listening Heart, and an autobiography, i am through you so i. 

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

This show originally aired in January 2016.

2020-04-09
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[Unedited] Brother David Steindl-Rast with Krista Tippett

We?re in a season of renewal in the natural world and in spiritual traditions; both Easter and Passover this year are utterly transformed. It?s drawing us back to the wisdom of Br. David Steindl-Rast, who makes useful distinctions around experiences that are life-giving and resilience-making yet can feel absurd to speak of in a moment like this. A Benedictine monk for over 60 years, Steindl-Rast was formed by 20th-century catastrophes. He calls joy ?the happiness that doesn?t depend on what happens.? And his gratefulness is not an easy gratitude or thanksgiving ? but a full-blooded, reality-based practice and choice.

Br. David Steindl-Rast is a Benedictine monk and a beloved teacher and author on the subject of gratitude. He?s the founder and senior advisor for A Network for Grateful Living. His books include Gratefulness, The Heart of Prayer: An Approach to Life in Fullness, A Listening Heart, and an autobiography, i am through you so i.

This show originally aired in January 2016.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "David Steindl-Rast ? How to Be Grateful in Every Moment (But Not for Everything)." Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-04-09
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A Poem in Gratitude for Health Care Workers

In Leanne O?Sullivan?s poem ?Leaving Early,? the poet writes to her ill husband, entrusting him into the care of a nurse named Fionnuala. As the novel coronavirus sweeps the globe, many of us can?t physically be there for loved ones who are sick. Instead, it is the health care workers ? and all involved in the health care system ? who are tirelessly present, caring for others in spite of exhaustion and the risk it brings to their own well being.

We offer this episode of Poetry Unbound in profound gratitude toward all who are working in health care right now.

?Leaving Early? comes from Leanne O?Sullivan?s book A Quarter of an Hour. Thank you to the publisher, Bloodaxe Books, who gave us permission to use Leanne?s poem. Read it on our website at onbeing.org.

Find the transcript for this episode at onbeing.org.

The original music in this episode was composed by Gautam Srikishan.

2020-04-03
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Ai-jen Poo ? This Is Our (Caring) Revolution

Ai-jen Poo is a next-generation labor organizer who co-founded a beautiful and muscular movement with caregivers and those who employ them: The National Domestic Workers Alliance. For over two decades, she has been reinventing policy and engaging a deep conversation that has now met its civilizational moment. This conversation was recorded before ?coronavirus? was a word we all knew. But the many dimensions of the crisis now upon us have revealed Ai-jen Poo and her world of wisdom and action as teachers for our life together, in and beyond it.

Ai-jen Poo is executive director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance and the co-director of Caring Across Generations. Her book is The Age of Dignity. Her podcast, co-hosted with Alicia Garza, is Sunstorm.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

2020-04-02
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[Unedited] Ai-jen Poo with Krista Tippett

Ai-jen Poo is a next-generation labor organizer who co-founded a beautiful and muscular movement with caregivers and those who employ them: The National Domestic Workers Alliance. For over two decades, she has been reinventing policy and engaging a deep conversation that has now met its civilizational moment. This conversation was recorded before ?coronavirus? was a word we all knew. But the many dimensions of the crisis now upon us have revealed Ai-jen Poo and her world of wisdom and action as teachers for our life together, in and beyond it. 

Ai-jen Poo is executive director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance and the co-director of Caring Across Generations. Her book is The Age of Dignity. Her podcast, co-hosted with Alicia Garza, is Sunstorm.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Ai-jen Poo ? This Is Our (Caring) Revolution." Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-04-02
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Living the Questions: At home, frustrated and stressed ? is 'just being' worthy right now?

?If I believe that we are all inherently worthy just by being human, how can I feel that way when I feel I?m doing ?nothing??? ? Anna Bondoc from Los Angeles

So many of us are raised to believe that hard work is what makes us valuable; many of our professions and even our identities as helpers are on hold. How does self-worth interact with just being when we feel we're doing nothing? Krista reflects on the problem with the phrase ?just being? ? and how settling inside ourselves right now, and kindness towards ourselves, are gifts to the world we want to make beyond this crisis.

Living the Questions is an occasional On Being segment where Krista muses on questions from our listening community. Submit your own at [email protected]

Krista Tippett created and leads the On Being Project, hosts the On Being radio show and podcast, and curates the Civil Conversations Project. She received the National Humanities Medal at the White House in 2014. She speaks widely and writes books including Becoming Wise: An Inquiry into the Mystery and Art of Living. Read her full bio here.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org

2020-03-31
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Ross Gay ? Tending Joy and Practicing Delight

In this unsettled moment, we?re returning to the shows we?re longing to hear again. Among them is this 2019 conversation with writer Ross Gay. The ephemeral nature of our being allows him to find delight in all sorts of places (especially his community garden). To be with Gay is to train your gaze to see the wonderful alongside the terrible; to attend to and meditate on what you love, even in the midst of difficult realities and as part of working for justice.

Ross Gay lives in Bloomington Indiana, where he?s a professor of English at Indiana University. His books include the poetry collection Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude and a book of essays, The Book of Delights. He co-founded The Tenderness Project together with Shayla Lawson.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org

This show originally aired in July 2019.

 

2020-03-26
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[Unedited] Ross Gay with Krista Tippett

In this unsettled moment, we?re returning to the shows we?re longing to hear again. Among them is this 2019 conversation with writer Ross Gay. The ephemeral nature of our being allows him to find delight in all sorts of places (especially his community garden). To be with Gay is to train your gaze to see the wonderful alongside the terrible; to attend to and meditate on what you love, even in the midst of difficult realities and as part of working for justice.

Ross Gay lives in Bloomington Indiana, where he?s a professor of English at Indiana University. His books include the poetry collection Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude and a book of essays, The Book of Delights. He co-founded The Tenderness Project together with Shayla Lawson.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Ross Gay ? Tending Joy and Practicing Delight ." Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-03-26
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Rebecca Solnit ? Falling Together

?When all the ordinary divides and patterns are shattered, people step up to become their brothers? keepers,? Rebecca Solnit writes. ?And that purposefulness and connectedness bring joy even amidst death, chaos, fear, and loss.? In this moment of global crisis, we?re returning to the conversations we?re longing to hear again and finding useful right now. A singular writer and thinker, Solnit celebrates the unpredictable and incalculable events that so often redeem our lives, both solitary and public. She searches for the hidden, transformative histories inside and after events we chronicle as disasters in places like post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans.   

Rebecca Solnit is a columnist at The Guardian and a regular contributor to Literary Hub. Her many books include Hope in the Dark, A Paradise Built in Hell, and her most recent, Recollections of My Nonexistence.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

This show originally aired in May 2016.

2020-03-19
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[Unedited] Rebecca Solnit with Krista Tippett

?When all the ordinary divides and patterns are shattered, people step up to become their brothers? keepers,? Rebecca Solnit writes. ?And that purposefulness and connectedness bring joy even amidst death, chaos, fear, and loss.? In this moment of global crisis, we?re returning to the conversations we?re longing to hear again and finding useful right now. A singular writer and thinker, Solnit celebrates the unpredictable and incalculable events that so often redeem our lives, both solitary and public. She searches for the hidden, transformative histories inside and after events we chronicle as disasters in places like post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans.   

Rebecca Solnit is a columnist at The Guardian and a regular contributor to Literary Hub. Her many books include Hope in the Dark, A Paradise Built in Hell, and her most recent, Recollections of My Nonexistence.

This show originally aired in May 2016.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Rebecca Solnit ? Falling Together" Find more at onbeing.org.

 

2020-03-19
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Carlo Rovelli ? All Reality Is Interaction

Physicist Carlo Rovelli says humans don?t understand the world as made by things, ?we understand the world made by kisses, or things like kisses ? happenings.? This everyday truth is as scientific as it is philosophical and political, and it unfolds with unexpected nuance in his science. Rovelli is one of the founders of loop quantum gravity theory and author of the tiny, bestselling book Seven Brief Lessons on Physics and The Order of Time. Seeing the world through his eyes, we understand that there is no such thing as ?here? or ?now.? Instead, he says, our senses convey a picture of reality that narrows our understanding of its fullness.

Carlo Rovelli is a professor of physics at Aix-Marseille University, where he is director of the quantum gravity group in the Center for Theoretical Physics. He is also director of the Samy Maroun Research Center for Time, Space, and the Quantum. His books include Seven Brief Lessons on Physics and, most recently, The Order of Time.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

This show originally aired in March 2017.

2020-03-12
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[Unedited] Carlo Rovelli with Krista Tippett

Physicist Carlo Rovelli says humans don?t understand the world as made by things, ?we understand the world made by kisses, or things like kisses ? happenings.? This everyday truth is as scientific as it is philosophical and political, and it unfolds with unexpected nuance in his science. Rovelli is one of the founders of loop quantum gravity theory and author of the tiny, bestselling book Seven Brief Lessons on Physics and The Order of Time. Seeing the world through his eyes, we understand that there is no such thing as ?here? or ?now.? Instead, he says, our senses convey a picture of reality that narrows our understanding of its fullness.

Carlo Rovelli is professor of physics at Aix-Marseille University, where he is director of the quantum gravity group in the Center for Theoretical Physics. He is also director of the Samy Maroun Research Center for Time, Space, and the Quantum. His books include Seven Brief Lessons on Physics and, most recently, The Order of Time.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Carlo Rovelli ? All Reality Is Interaction." Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-03-12
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Nicholas Christakis ? How We?re Wired for Goodness

Sociologist Nicholas Christakis says we come to social goodness as naturally as we come to our bloodier inclinations. Research out of his Human Nature Lab at Yale shows that capacities like friendship, love, teaching, and cooperation exert a tremendous and practical force on us ? and yet we don?t think of those behaviors as grit for what?s helped humans evolve as a species. Christakis? science ? and the passion with which he shares and lives what he learns ? put goodness in refreshing evolutionary perspective.

Nicholas Christakis is Sterling Professor of Social and Natural Science at Yale University, where he?s also the director of the Human Nature Lab and co-director of the Institute for Network Science. He?s the author of Connected: How Your Friends? Friends? Friends Affect Everything You Feel, Think, and Do. His most recent book is Blueprint: The Evolutionary Origins of a Good Society.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

2020-03-05
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[Unedited] Nicholas Christakis with Krista Tippett

Sociologist Nicholas Christakis says we come to social goodness as naturally as we come to our bloodier inclinations. Research out of his Human Nature Lab at Yale shows that capacities like friendship, love, teaching, and cooperation exert a tremendous and practical force on us ? and yet we don?t think of those behaviors as grit for what?s helped humans evolve as a species. Christakis? science ? and the passion with which he shares and lives what he learns ? put goodness in refreshing evolutionary perspective.

Nicholas Christakis is Sterling Professor of Social and Natural Science at Yale University, where he?s also the director of the Human Nature Lab and co-director of the Institute for Network Science. He?s the author of Connected: How Your Friends? Friends? Friends Affect Everything You Feel, Think, and Do. His most recent book is Blueprint: The Evolutionary Origins of a Good Society.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Nicholas Christakis ? How We?re Wired for Goodness." Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-03-05
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Jill Tarter ? It Takes a Cosmos to Make a Human

The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence ? or SETI ? goes beyond hunting for E.T. and habitable planets. Scientists in the field are using telescopes and satellites looking for signs of outright civilizational intelligence. One of the founding pioneers in this search is astronomer Jill Tarter. She is a cofounder of the SETI Institute and was an inspiration for Jodie Foster?s character in the movie Contact, based on the novel by Carl Sagan. To speak with Tarter is to begin to grasp the creative majesty of SETI and what?s relevant now in the ancient question: ?Are we alone in the universe??

Jill Tarter is the cofounder and chair emeritus for SETI Research at the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California. She currently serves on the management board for the Allen Telescope Array. She has been awarded two Exceptional Public Service medals from NASA and the Women in Aerospace Lifetime Achievement Award.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

2020-02-27
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[Unedited] Jill Tarter with Krista Tippett

The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence ? or SETI ? goes beyond hunting for E.T. and habitable planets. Scientists in the field are using telescopes and satellites looking for signs of outright civilizational intelligence. One of the founding pioneers in this search is astronomer Jill Tarter. She is a cofounder of the SETI Institute and was an inspiration for Jodie Foster?s character in the movie Contact, based on the novel by Carl Sagan. To speak with Tarter is to begin to grasp the creative majesty of SETI and what?s relevant now in the ancient question: ?Are we alone in the universe??

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Jill Tarter ? It Takes a Cosmos to Make a Human." Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-02-27
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George Coyne and Guy Consolmagno ? Asteroids, Stars, and the Love of God

The wise and beloved Vatican astronomer Father George Coyne died last week. Like most of the Vatican astronomers across history, he was a Jesuit. More than 30 objects on the moon are named after the Jesuits who mapped it, and ten Jesuits in history have had asteroids named after them. Father Coyne was one of the few with this distinction, alongside his friend and fellow Vatican astronomer Brother Guy Consolmagno. In a conversation filled with laughter, we experience a spacious way to approach life, faith, and the universe.

Father George Coyne was the Director of the Vatican Astronomical Observatory from 1978 to 2006 and author of the book Wayfarers in the Cosmos: The Human Quest for Meaning. He died on February 11, 2020, at the age of 87.

Brother Guy Consolmagno was appointed Director of the Vatican Astronomical Observatory by Pope Francis in 2015. His books include Brother Astronomer: Adventures of a Vatican Scientist and Would You Baptize an Extraterrestrial?: and Other Questions from the Astronomers' In-box at the Vatican Observatory.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org

2020-02-20
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