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On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

Groundbreaking Peabody Award-winning conversation about the big questions of meaning ? spiritual inquiry, science, social healing, and the arts. Each week a new discovery about the immensity of our lives. Hosted by Krista Tippett, new every Thursday.

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Episodes

A Poem in Gratitude for Health Care Workers

In Leanne O?Sullivan?s poem ?Leaving Early,? the poet writes to her ill husband, entrusting him into the care of a nurse named Fionnuala. As the novel coronavirus sweeps the globe, many of us can?t physically be there for loved ones who are sick. Instead, it is the health care workers ? and all involved in the health care system ? who are tirelessly present, caring for others in spite of exhaustion and the risk it brings to their own well being.

We offer this episode of Poetry Unbound in profound gratitude toward all who are working in health care right now.

?Leaving Early? comes from Leanne O?Sullivan?s book A Quarter of an Hour. Thank you to the publisher, Bloodaxe Books, who gave us permission to use Leanne?s poem. Read it on our website at onbeing.org.

Find the transcript for this episode at onbeing.org.

The original music in this episode was composed by Gautam Srikishan.

2020-04-03
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Ai-jen Poo ? This Is Our (Caring) Revolution

Ai-jen Poo is a next-generation labor organizer who co-founded a beautiful and muscular movement with caregivers and those who employ them: The National Domestic Workers Alliance. For over two decades, she has been reinventing policy and engaging a deep conversation that has now met its civilizational moment. This conversation was recorded before ?coronavirus? was a word we all knew. But the many dimensions of the crisis now upon us have revealed Ai-jen Poo and her world of wisdom and action as teachers for our life together, in and beyond it.

Ai-jen Poo is executive director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance and the co-director of Caring Across Generations. Her book is The Age of Dignity. Her podcast, co-hosted with Alicia Garza, is Sunstorm.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

2020-04-02
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[Unedited] Ai-jen Poo with Krista Tippett

Ai-jen Poo is a next-generation labor organizer who co-founded a beautiful and muscular movement with caregivers and those who employ them: The National Domestic Workers Alliance. For over two decades, she has been reinventing policy and engaging a deep conversation that has now met its civilizational moment. This conversation was recorded before ?coronavirus? was a word we all knew. But the many dimensions of the crisis now upon us have revealed Ai-jen Poo and her world of wisdom and action as teachers for our life together, in and beyond it. 

Ai-jen Poo is executive director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance and the co-director of Caring Across Generations. Her book is The Age of Dignity. Her podcast, co-hosted with Alicia Garza, is Sunstorm.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Ai-jen Poo ? This Is Our (Caring) Revolution." Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-04-02
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Living the Questions: At home, frustrated and stressed ? is 'just being' worthy right now?

?If I believe that we are all inherently worthy just by being human, how can I feel that way when I feel I?m doing ?nothing??? ? Anna Bondoc from Los Angeles

So many of us are raised to believe that hard work is what makes us valuable; many of our professions and even our identities as helpers are on hold. How does self-worth interact with just being when we feel we're doing nothing? Krista reflects on the problem with the phrase ?just being? ? and how settling inside ourselves right now, and kindness towards ourselves, are gifts to the world we want to make beyond this crisis.

Living the Questions is an occasional On Being segment where Krista muses on questions from our listening community. Submit your own at [email protected]

Krista Tippett created and leads the On Being Project, hosts the On Being radio show and podcast, and curates the Civil Conversations Project. She received the National Humanities Medal at the White House in 2014. She speaks widely and writes books including Becoming Wise: An Inquiry into the Mystery and Art of Living. Read her full bio here.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org

2020-03-31
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Ross Gay ? Tending Joy and Practicing Delight

In this unsettled moment, we?re returning to the shows we?re longing to hear again. Among them is this 2019 conversation with writer Ross Gay. The ephemeral nature of our being allows him to find delight in all sorts of places (especially his community garden). To be with Gay is to train your gaze to see the wonderful alongside the terrible; to attend to and meditate on what you love, even in the midst of difficult realities and as part of working for justice.

Ross Gay lives in Bloomington Indiana, where he?s a professor of English at Indiana University. His books include the poetry collection Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude and a book of essays, The Book of Delights. He co-founded The Tenderness Project together with Shayla Lawson.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org

This show originally aired in July 2019.

 

2020-03-26
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[Unedited] Ross Gay with Krista Tippett

In this unsettled moment, we?re returning to the shows we?re longing to hear again. Among them is this 2019 conversation with writer Ross Gay. The ephemeral nature of our being allows him to find delight in all sorts of places (especially his community garden). To be with Gay is to train your gaze to see the wonderful alongside the terrible; to attend to and meditate on what you love, even in the midst of difficult realities and as part of working for justice.

Ross Gay lives in Bloomington Indiana, where he?s a professor of English at Indiana University. His books include the poetry collection Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude and a book of essays, The Book of Delights. He co-founded The Tenderness Project together with Shayla Lawson.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Ross Gay ? Tending Joy and Practicing Delight ." Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-03-26
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Rebecca Solnit ? Falling Together

?When all the ordinary divides and patterns are shattered, people step up to become their brothers? keepers,? Rebecca Solnit writes. ?And that purposefulness and connectedness bring joy even amidst death, chaos, fear, and loss.? In this moment of global crisis, we?re returning to the conversations we?re longing to hear again and finding useful right now. A singular writer and thinker, Solnit celebrates the unpredictable and incalculable events that so often redeem our lives, both solitary and public. She searches for the hidden, transformative histories inside and after events we chronicle as disasters in places like post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans.   

Rebecca Solnit is a columnist at The Guardian and a regular contributor to Literary Hub. Her many books include Hope in the Dark, A Paradise Built in Hell, and her most recent, Recollections of My Nonexistence.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

This show originally aired in May 2016.

2020-03-19
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[Unedited] Rebecca Solnit with Krista Tippett

?When all the ordinary divides and patterns are shattered, people step up to become their brothers? keepers,? Rebecca Solnit writes. ?And that purposefulness and connectedness bring joy even amidst death, chaos, fear, and loss.? In this moment of global crisis, we?re returning to the conversations we?re longing to hear again and finding useful right now. A singular writer and thinker, Solnit celebrates the unpredictable and incalculable events that so often redeem our lives, both solitary and public. She searches for the hidden, transformative histories inside and after events we chronicle as disasters in places like post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans.   

Rebecca Solnit is a columnist at The Guardian and a regular contributor to Literary Hub. Her many books include Hope in the Dark, A Paradise Built in Hell, and her most recent, Recollections of My Nonexistence.

This show originally aired in May 2016.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Rebecca Solnit ? Falling Together" Find more at onbeing.org.

 

2020-03-19
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Carlo Rovelli ? All Reality Is Interaction

Physicist Carlo Rovelli says humans don?t understand the world as made by things, ?we understand the world made by kisses, or things like kisses ? happenings.? This everyday truth is as scientific as it is philosophical and political, and it unfolds with unexpected nuance in his science. Rovelli is one of the founders of loop quantum gravity theory and author of the tiny, bestselling book Seven Brief Lessons on Physics and The Order of Time. Seeing the world through his eyes, we understand that there is no such thing as ?here? or ?now.? Instead, he says, our senses convey a picture of reality that narrows our understanding of its fullness.

Carlo Rovelli is a professor of physics at Aix-Marseille University, where he is director of the quantum gravity group in the Center for Theoretical Physics. He is also director of the Samy Maroun Research Center for Time, Space, and the Quantum. His books include Seven Brief Lessons on Physics and, most recently, The Order of Time.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

This show originally aired in March 2017.

2020-03-12
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[Unedited] Carlo Rovelli with Krista Tippett

Physicist Carlo Rovelli says humans don?t understand the world as made by things, ?we understand the world made by kisses, or things like kisses ? happenings.? This everyday truth is as scientific as it is philosophical and political, and it unfolds with unexpected nuance in his science. Rovelli is one of the founders of loop quantum gravity theory and author of the tiny, bestselling book Seven Brief Lessons on Physics and The Order of Time. Seeing the world through his eyes, we understand that there is no such thing as ?here? or ?now.? Instead, he says, our senses convey a picture of reality that narrows our understanding of its fullness.

Carlo Rovelli is professor of physics at Aix-Marseille University, where he is director of the quantum gravity group in the Center for Theoretical Physics. He is also director of the Samy Maroun Research Center for Time, Space, and the Quantum. His books include Seven Brief Lessons on Physics and, most recently, The Order of Time.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Carlo Rovelli ? All Reality Is Interaction." Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-03-12
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Nicholas Christakis ? How We?re Wired for Goodness

Sociologist Nicholas Christakis says we come to social goodness as naturally as we come to our bloodier inclinations. Research out of his Human Nature Lab at Yale shows that capacities like friendship, love, teaching, and cooperation exert a tremendous and practical force on us ? and yet we don?t think of those behaviors as grit for what?s helped humans evolve as a species. Christakis? science ? and the passion with which he shares and lives what he learns ? put goodness in refreshing evolutionary perspective.

Nicholas Christakis is Sterling Professor of Social and Natural Science at Yale University, where he?s also the director of the Human Nature Lab and co-director of the Institute for Network Science. He?s the author of Connected: How Your Friends? Friends? Friends Affect Everything You Feel, Think, and Do. His most recent book is Blueprint: The Evolutionary Origins of a Good Society.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

2020-03-05
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[Unedited] Nicholas Christakis with Krista Tippett

Sociologist Nicholas Christakis says we come to social goodness as naturally as we come to our bloodier inclinations. Research out of his Human Nature Lab at Yale shows that capacities like friendship, love, teaching, and cooperation exert a tremendous and practical force on us ? and yet we don?t think of those behaviors as grit for what?s helped humans evolve as a species. Christakis? science ? and the passion with which he shares and lives what he learns ? put goodness in refreshing evolutionary perspective.

Nicholas Christakis is Sterling Professor of Social and Natural Science at Yale University, where he?s also the director of the Human Nature Lab and co-director of the Institute for Network Science. He?s the author of Connected: How Your Friends? Friends? Friends Affect Everything You Feel, Think, and Do. His most recent book is Blueprint: The Evolutionary Origins of a Good Society.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Nicholas Christakis ? How We?re Wired for Goodness." Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-03-05
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Jill Tarter ? It Takes a Cosmos to Make a Human

The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence ? or SETI ? goes beyond hunting for E.T. and habitable planets. Scientists in the field are using telescopes and satellites looking for signs of outright civilizational intelligence. One of the founding pioneers in this search is astronomer Jill Tarter. She is a cofounder of the SETI Institute and was an inspiration for Jodie Foster?s character in the movie Contact, based on the novel by Carl Sagan. To speak with Tarter is to begin to grasp the creative majesty of SETI and what?s relevant now in the ancient question: ?Are we alone in the universe??

Jill Tarter is the cofounder and chair emeritus for SETI Research at the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California. She currently serves on the management board for the Allen Telescope Array. She has been awarded two Exceptional Public Service medals from NASA and the Women in Aerospace Lifetime Achievement Award.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

2020-02-27
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[Unedited] Jill Tarter with Krista Tippett

The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence ? or SETI ? goes beyond hunting for E.T. and habitable planets. Scientists in the field are using telescopes and satellites looking for signs of outright civilizational intelligence. One of the founding pioneers in this search is astronomer Jill Tarter. She is a cofounder of the SETI Institute and was an inspiration for Jodie Foster?s character in the movie Contact, based on the novel by Carl Sagan. To speak with Tarter is to begin to grasp the creative majesty of SETI and what?s relevant now in the ancient question: ?Are we alone in the universe??

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Jill Tarter ? It Takes a Cosmos to Make a Human." Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-02-27
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George Coyne and Guy Consolmagno ? Asteroids, Stars, and the Love of God

The wise and beloved Vatican astronomer Father George Coyne died last week. Like most of the Vatican astronomers across history, he was a Jesuit. More than 30 objects on the moon are named after the Jesuits who mapped it, and ten Jesuits in history have had asteroids named after them. Father Coyne was one of the few with this distinction, alongside his friend and fellow Vatican astronomer Brother Guy Consolmagno. In a conversation filled with laughter, we experience a spacious way to approach life, faith, and the universe.

Father George Coyne was the Director of the Vatican Astronomical Observatory from 1978 to 2006 and author of the book Wayfarers in the Cosmos: The Human Quest for Meaning. He died on February 11, 2020, at the age of 87.

Brother Guy Consolmagno was appointed Director of the Vatican Astronomical Observatory by Pope Francis in 2015. His books include Brother Astronomer: Adventures of a Vatican Scientist and Would You Baptize an Extraterrestrial?: and Other Questions from the Astronomers' In-box at the Vatican Observatory.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org

2020-02-20
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[Unedited] George Coyne and Guy Consolmagno with Krista Tippett

The wise and beloved Vatican astronomer Father George Coyne died last week. Like most of the Vatican astronomers across history, he was a Jesuit. More than 30 objects on the moon are named after the Jesuits who mapped it, and ten Jesuits in history have had asteroids named after them. Father Coyne was one of the few with this distinction, alongside his friend and fellow Vatican astronomer Brother Guy Consolmagno. In a conversation filled with laughter, we experience a spacious way to approach life, faith, and the universe.

Father George Coyne was the Director of the Vatican Astronomical Observatory from 1978 to 2006 and author of the book Wayfarers in the Cosmos: The Human Quest for Meaning. He died on February 11, 2020, at the age of 87.

Brother Guy Consolmagno was appointed Director of the Vatican Astronomical Observatory by Pope Francis in 2015. His books include Brother Astronomer: Adventures of a Vatican Scientist and Would You Baptize an Extraterrestrial?: and Other Questions from the Astronomers' In-box at the Vatican Observatory.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Guy Consolmagno and George Coyne ? Asteroids, Stars, and the Love of God" Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-02-20
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Sandra Cisneros ? A House of Her Own

The House on Mango Street by Mexican American writer Sandra Cisneros has been taught in high schools across the U.S. for decades. A poetic writer of many genres, she?s received a MacArthur ?genius grant,? a National Medal of Arts, and many other accolades. Cisneros grew up in an immigrant household where it was assumed she would marry as her primary destiny. In this warm and lively conversation with a room full of Latinx teens, she gives voice to the choice to be single ? and, single or not, to know solitude as sacred.

Sandra Cisneros is a writer and poet whose books include The House on Mango Street, Caramelo, and a memoir, A House of My Own. Her work has been lauded in many ways, including with a MacArthur ?genius grant,? the Texas Medal of Arts, the National Medal of Arts, and the PEN/Nabokov Award for international literature.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org

2020-02-13
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[Unedited] Sandra Cisneros with Krista Tippett

The House on Mango Street by Mexican American writer Sandra Cisneros has been taught in high schools across the U.S. for decades. A poetic writer of many genres, she?s received a MacArthur ?genius grant,? a National Medal of Arts, and many other accolades. Cisneros grew up in an immigrant household where it was assumed she would marry as her primary destiny. In this warm and lively conversation with a room full of Latinx teens, she gives voice to the choice to be single ? and, single or not, to know solitude as sacred.

Sandra Cisneros is a writer and poet whose books include The House on Mango Street, Caramelo, and a memoir, A House of My Own. Her work has been lauded in many ways, including with a MacArthur ?genius grant,? the Texas Medal of Arts, the National Medal of Arts, and the PEN/Nabokov Award for international literature.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Sandra Cisneros ? A House of Her Own." Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-02-13
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Ezra Klein ? How We Walked Into This and How We Can Walk Out

Journalist Ezra Klein has been widely interviewed about his new book, Why We're Polarized. In this conversation, he's frank and reflective about what's at stake in human terms in this political moment. And he describes how we all ? Democrat and Republican, journalist and citizen alike ? walked into this as a way to trace our steps out of it.

Ezra Klein is the co-founder and editor-at-large of Vox Media and host of two podcasts: The Weeds and The Ezra Klein Show. His book is Why We?re Polarized.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org

2020-02-06
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[Unedited] Ezra Klein with Krista Tippett

Journalist Ezra Klein has been widely interviewed about his new book, Why We're Polarized. In this conversation, he's frank and reflective about what's at stake in human terms in this political moment. And he describes how we all ? Democrat and Republican, journalist and citizen alike ? walked into this as a way to trace our steps out of it.

Ezra Klein is the co-founder and editor-at-large of Vox Media and host of two podcasts: The Weeds and The Ezra Klein Show. His book is Why We?re Polarized.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Ezra Klein ? How We Walked Into This and How We Can Walk Out." Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-02-06
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Pádraig Ó Tuama and Marilyn Nelson ? A New Imagination of Prayer

Pádraig Ó Tuama and Marilyn Nelson are beloved teachers to many; to bring them together was a delight and a balm. Nelson is a poet and professor and contemplative, an excavator of stories that would rather stay hidden yet lead us into new life. Ó Tuama is a poet, theologian, conflict mediator, and the host of our new podcast, Poetry Unbound. Together, they venture unexpectedly into the hospitable ? and intriguingly universal ? form of poetry that is prayer.

Editor?s note: This episode includes a preview from our new season of Poetry Unbound featuring a poem by Joy Harjo.

Marilyn Nelson is professor emerita of English at the University of Connecticut. She is the recipient of the Poetry Society of America?s Frost Medal ?for distinguished lifetime achievement? and the 2019 Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize. Her most recent books include Mrs. Nelson?s Classroom and The Meeting House.

Pádraig Ó Tuama is a poet, theologian, and conflict mediator, and was leader of the Corrymeela community until 2019. He is also the inaugural poet laureate of The On Being Project and hosts the Poetry Unbound podcast. His books include a prayer book, Daily Prayer with the Corrymeela Community, a book of poetry, Sorry for Your Troubles, and a memoir, In the Shelter: Finding a Home in the World.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org

This show originally aired in September 2018.

2020-01-30
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Introducing ?Poetry Unbound?

We?re excited to share the first episode of our new podcast, Poetry Unbound. It?s your new ritual: Immerse yourself in a single poem, guided by Pádraig Ó Tuama. Short and unhurried; contemplative and energizing. Anchor your week by listening to the everyday poetry of your life, with new episodes on Monday and Friday during the season.

This episode features Brad Aaron Modlin?s poem, ?What You Missed That Day You Were Absent from Fourth Grade.?

For more, subscribe to Poetry Unbound on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or wherever you listen.

2020-01-30
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[Unedited] Pa?draig O? Tuama and Marilyn Nelson with Krista Tippett

Pádraig Ó Tuama and Marilyn Nelson are beloved teachers to many; to bring them together was a delight and a balm. Nelson is a poet and professor and contemplative, an excavator of stories that would rather stay hidden yet lead us into new life. Ó Tuama is a poet, theologian, conflict mediator, and the host of our new podcast, Poetry Unbound. Together, they venture unexpectedly into the hospitable ? and intriguingly universal ? form of poetry that is prayer.

Marilyn Nelson is professor emerita of English at the University of Connecticut. She is the recipient of the Poetry Society of America?s Frost Medal ?for distinguished lifetime achievement? and the 2019 Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize. Her most recent books include Mrs. Nelson?s Classroom and The Meeting House.

Pádraig Ó Tuama is a poet, theologian, and conflict mediator, and was leader of the Corrymeela community until 2019. He is also the inaugural poet laureate of The On Being Project and hosts the Poetry Unbound podcast. His books include a prayer book, Daily Prayer with the Corrymeela Community, a book of poetry, Sorry for Your Troubles, and a memoir, In the Shelter: Finding a Home in the World.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Pádraig Ó Tuama and Marilyn Nelson ? A New Imagination of Prayer." Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-01-30
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Alison Gopnik ? The Evolutionary Power of Children and Teenagers

Alison Gopnik understands babies and children as the R&D division of humanity. From her cognitive science lab at the University of California, -Berkeley, she investigates the ?evolutionary paradox? of the long human childhood. When she first trained in philosophy and developmental psychology, the minds of children were treated as blank slates. But her research is helping us see how even the most mundane facts of a toddler or a teenager ? from fantasy play to rebelliousness ? tell us what it means to be human.

Alison Gopnik is a professor of psychology and affiliate professor of philosophy at the University of California, -Berkeley, where she also heads the Cognitive Development and Learning Lab. She?s written more than 100 journal articles and several books, including The Scientist in the Crib, The Philosophical Baby, and, most recently, The Gardener and the Carpenter.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org

2020-01-23
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[Unedited] Alison Gopnik with Krista Tippett

Alison Gopnik understands babies and children as the R&D division of humanity. From her cognitive science lab at the University of California, -Berkeley, she investigates the ?evolutionary paradox? of the long human childhood. When she first trained in philosophy and developmental psychology, the minds of children were treated as blank slates. But her research is helping us see how even the most mundane facts of a toddler or a teenager ? from fantasy play to rebelliousness ? tell us what it means to be human.

Alison Gopnik is a professor of psychology and affiliate professor of philosophy at the University of California, -Berkeley, where she also heads the Cognitive Development and Learning Lab. She?s written more than 100 journal articles and several books, including The Scientist in the Crib, The Philosophical Baby, and, most recently, The Gardener and the Carpenter.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Alison Gopnik ? The Evolutionary Power of Children and Teenagers." Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-01-23
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Ruby Sales ? Where Does it Hurt?

Civil rights legend Ruby Sales learned to ask ?Where does it hurt?? because it?s a question that drives to the heart of the matter ? and a question we scarcely know how to ask in public life now. Sales says we must be as clear about what we love as about what we hate if we want to make change. And even as she unsettles some of what we think we know about the force of religion in civil rights history, she names a ?spiritual crisis of white America? as a calling of today.

Ruby Sales is the founder and director of The Spirit House Project in Atlanta. She is included in an oral history of the Civil Rights Movement at the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org

This show originally aired in September 2016.

2020-01-16
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[Unedited] Ruby Sales with Krista Tippett

Civil rights legend Ruby Sales learned to ask ?Where does it hurt?? because it?s a question that drives to the heart of the matter ? and a question we scarcely know how to ask in public life now. Sales says we must be as clear about what we love as about what we hate if we want to make change. And even as she unsettles some of what we think we know about the force of religion in civil rights history, she names a ?spiritual crisis of white America? as a calling of today.

Ruby Sales is the founder and director of The Spirit House Project in Atlanta. She is included in an oral history of the Civil Rights Movement at the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Ruby Sales ? Where Does It Hurt?" Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-01-16
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Joe Henry ? Welcoming Flies at the Picnic

Joe Henry faced his mortality in 2018 when he was diagnosed with stage 4 prostate cancer and told he might only have months to live. Now in remission, the singer-songwriter and producer has created a gorgeous new album, The Gospel According to Water. Henry?s wisdom on living ? and the loss that strangely defines it ? ran all the way through this conversation, recorded before his cancer, in 2015. Beloved by fellow musicians as much as by his fans, he?s produced over a dozen albums of his own and written and produced for other artists, from Elvis Costello to Madonna.

Joe Henry is a Grammy Award-winning producer and singer-songwriter. He's recorded 13 albums and produced dozens of other artists. He's the co-author of Furious Cool: Richard Pryor and the World That Made Him. His albums include Invisible Hour, Shine A Light: Field Recordings From The Great American Railroad, and, most recently, The Gospel According to Water.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org. This show originally aired in February 2015.

2020-01-09
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[Unedited] Joe Henry with Krista Tippett

Joe Henry faced his mortality in 2018 when he was diagnosed with stage 4 prostate cancer and told he might only have months to live. Now in remission, the singer-songwriter and producer has created a gorgeous new album, The Gospel According to Water. Henry?s wisdom on living ? and the loss that strangely defines it ? ran all the way through this conversation, recorded before his cancer, in 2015. Beloved by fellow musicians as much as by his fans, he?s produced over a dozen albums of his own and written and produced for other artists, from Elvis Costello to Madonna.

Joe Henry is a Grammy Award-winning producer and singer-songwriter. He's recorded 13 albums and produced dozens of other artists. He's the co-author of Furious Cool: Richard Pryor and the World That Made Him. His albums include Invisible Hour, Shine A Light: Field Recordings From The Great American Railroad, and, most recently, The Gospel According to Water.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Joe Henry ? Welcoming Flies at the Picnic." Find more at onbeing.org.

2020-01-09
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Brené Brown ? Strong Back, Soft Front, Wild Heart

Brené Brown says our belonging to each other can?t be lost, but it can be forgotten. Her research has reminded the world in recent years of the uncomfortable, life-giving link between vulnerability and courage. Now she?s turning her attention to how we walked into the crisis of our life together and how we can move beyond it: with strong backs, soft fronts, and wild hearts.  

Brené Brown is a research professor at the University of Houston, where she holds the Huffington Foundation-Brené Brown Endowed Chair at the Graduate College of Social Work. Her books include The Gifts of Imperfection, Braving the Wilderness, and, most recently, Dare to Lead.  

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org. This show originally aired in February 2018.

2020-01-02
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[Unedited] Brené Brown with Krista Tippett

Brené Brown says our belonging to each other can?t be lost, but it can be forgotten. Her research has reminded the world in recent years of the uncomfortable, life-giving link between vulnerability and courage. Now she?s turning her attention to how we walked into the crisis of our life together and how we can move beyond it: with strong backs, soft fronts, and wild hearts.

Brené Brown is a research professor at the University of Houston, where she holds the Huffington Foundation-Brené Brown Endowed Chair at the Graduate College of Social Work. Her books include The Gifts of Imperfection, Braving the Wilderness, and, most recently, Dare to Lead.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Brené Brown ? Strong Back, Soft Front, Wild Heart." Find more at onbeing.org. This show originally aired in February 2018.

2020-01-02
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Bessel van der Kolk ? How Trauma Lodges in the Body

Psychiatrist Bessel van der Kolk is an innovator in treating the effects of overwhelming experiences. We call this ?trauma? when we encounter it in life and news, and we tend to leap to address it by talking. But Bessel van der Kolk knows how some experiences imprint themselves beyond where language can reach. He explores state-of-the-art therapeutic treatments ? including body work like yoga and eye movement therapy ? and shares what he and others are learning on this edge of humanity about the complexity of memory, our need for others, and how our brains take care of our bodies.

Bessel van der Kolk is the founder and medical director of the Trauma Center in Brookline, Massachusetts. He?s also a professor of psychiatry at Boston University Medical School. His books include Traumatic Stress: The Effects of Overwhelming Experience on the Mind, Body, and Society and The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org. This show originally aired in July 2013.

2019-12-26
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[Unedited] Bessel van der Kolk with Krista Tippett

Psychiatrist Bessel van der Kolk is an innovator in treating the effects of overwhelming experiences. We call this ?trauma? when we encounter it in life and news, and we tend to leap to address it by talking. But Bessel van der Kolk knows how some experiences imprint themselves beyond where language can reach. He explores state-of-the-art therapeutic treatments ? including body work like yoga and eye movement therapy ? and shares what he and others are learning on this edge of humanity about the complexity of memory, our need for others, and how our brains take care of our bodies.

Bessel van der Kolk is the founder and medical director of the Trauma Center in Brookline, Massachusetts. He?s also a professor of psychiatry at Boston University Medical School. His books include Traumatic Stress: The Effects of Overwhelming Experience on the Mind, Body, and Society and The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Bessel van der Kolk ? How Trauma Lodges in the Body." Find more at onbeing.org. This show originally aired in July 2013.

2019-12-26
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Greg Boyle ? The Calling of Delight: Gangs, Service, and Kinship

Fr. Greg Boyle makes amazingly winsome connections between things like service and delight, compassion and awe. He landed as an idealistic young Jesuit in a gang-heavy neighborhood of Los Angeles three decades ago. Now he heads Homeboy Industries, which employs former gang members in a constellation of businesses from screen printing to a farmers? market to a bakery. This is not work of helping, he says, but of finding kinship.

Greg Boyle is founder and executive director of Homeboy Industries in Los Angeles. His books include ?Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Compassion? and, more recently, ?Barking to the Choir: The Power of Radical Kinship.?

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org. This show originally aired in February 2013.

2019-12-19
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[Unedited] Greg Boyle with Krista Tippett

Fr. Greg Boyle makes amazingly winsome connections between things like service and delight, compassion and awe. He landed as an idealistic young Jesuit in a gang-heavy neighborhood of Los Angeles three decades ago. Now he heads Homeboy Industries, which employs former gang members in a constellation of businesses from screen printing to a farmers? market to a bakery. This is not work of helping, he says, but of finding kinship.

Greg Boyle is founder and executive director of Homeboy Industries in Los Angeles. His books include ?Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Compassion? and, more recently, ?Barking to the Choir: The Power of Radical Kinship.?

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the

On Being

episode "Greg Boyle ? The Calling of Delight: Gangs, Service, and Kinship." Find more at onbeing.org

. This show originally aired in February 2013.

 

2019-12-19
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David Whyte ? The Conversational Nature of Reality

?Sometimes it takes darkness and the sweet / confinement of your aloneness / to learn / anything or anyone / that does not bring you alive / is too small for you.? David Whyte is a poet and philosopher who believes in the power of a ?beautiful question? amid the drama of work as well as the drama of life and the ways the two overlap. He shared a deep friendship with the late Irish philosopher John O?Donohue. They were, David Whyte says, like ?two bookends.? More recently, he?s written about the consolation, nourishment, and underlying meaning of everyday words.

David Whyte is an associate fellow at Saïd Business School at the University of Oxford. His books include The Heart Aroused: Poetry and the Preservation of the Soul in Corporate America, Consolations: The Solace, Nourishment, and Underlying Meaning of Everyday Words and The Bell and The Blackbird. His latest collection is David Whyte: Essentials.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org. This show originally aired in April 2016.

2019-12-12
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"Close" by David Whyte read by Krista Tippett

"Close" by David Whyte read by Krista Tippett

David Whyte is an associate fellow at Saïd Business School at the University of Oxford. His books include The Heart Aroused: Poetry and the Preservation of the Soul in Corporate America, Consolations: The Solace, Nourishment, and Underlying Meaning of Everyday Words and The Bell and The Blackbird. His latest collection is David Whyte: Essentials.

Find more at onbeing.org

2019-12-12
Link to episode

[Unedited] David Whyte with Krista Tippett

?Sometimes it takes darkness and the sweet / confinement of your aloneness / to learn / anything or anyone / that does not bring you alive / is too small for you.? David Whyte is a poet and philosopher who believes in the power of a ?beautiful question? amid the drama of work as well as the drama of life and the ways the two overlap. He shared a deep friendship with the late Irish philosopher John O?Donohue. They were, David Whyte says, like ?two bookends.? More recently, he?s written about the consolation, nourishment, and underlying meaning of everyday words.

David Whyte is an associate fellow at Saïd Business School at the University of Oxford. His books include The Heart Aroused: Poetry and the Preservation of the Soul in Corporate America, Consolations: The Solace, Nourishment, and Underlying Meaning of Everyday Words and The Bell and The Blackbird. His latest collection is David Whyte: Essentials.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "David Whyte ? The Conversational Nature of Reality." Find more at onbeing.org. This show originally aired in April 2016. 

2019-12-12
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Serene Jones ? On Grace

Serene Jones describes theology as the place and story you think of when you ask yourself about the meaning of your life, the world, and the possibility of God. For her, that place is a ?dusty piece of land? on the plains of Oklahoma where she grew up. ?I go there to find my story ? my theology. I go there to be born again; to be made whole; to unite with what I was, what I am, and what I will become.? In her work as a public theologian, Jones explores theology as clarifying lens on the present ? from grace to repentance to the importance of moving from grieving to mourning.

Serene Jones is a minister ordained in the Disciples of Christ and the United Church of Christ. She currently serves as the 16th president ? and the first female president ? of Union Theological Seminary in New York City. Her books include Trauma and Grace: Theology in a Ruptured World, Feminist Theory and Christian Theology: Cartographies of Grace, and, most recently, Call It Grace: Finding Meaning in a Fractured World.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

2019-12-05
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[Unedited] Serene Jones with Krista Tippett

Serene Jones describes theology as the place and story you think of when you ask yourself about the meaning of your life, the world, and the possibility of God. For her, that place is a ?dusty piece of land? on the plains of Oklahoma where she grew up. ?I go there to find my story ? my theology. I go there to be born again; to be made whole; to unite with what I was, what I am, and what I will become.? In her work as a public theologian, Jones explores theology as clarifying lens on the present ? from grace to repentance to the importance of moving from grieving to mourning.

Serene Jones is a minister ordained in the Disciples of Christ and the United Church of Christ. She currently serves as the 16th president ? and the first female president ? of Union Theological Seminary in New York City. Her books include Trauma and Grace: Theology in a Ruptured World, Feminist Theory and Christian Theology: Cartographies of Grace, and, most recently, Call It Grace: Finding Meaning in a Fractured World.

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Serene Jones ? On Grace" Find more at onbeing.org.

2019-12-05
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Richard Blanco ? How to Love a Country

As a longtime civil engineer by day and a poet by night, Cuban American writer Richard Blanco has straddled the many ways a sense of place merges with human emotion to form the meaning of home and belonging. In 2013, he became the fifth poet to read at a presidential inauguration (he was also the youngest and the first immigrant). The thoughtfulness, elegance, and humor of Blanco?s poetry and his person captivated the crowd for this live conversation at the Chautauqua Institution. 

Richard Blanco practiced civil engineering for more than 20 years. He is now an associate professor of creative writing at his alma mater, Florida International University. His books of non-fiction and poetry include ?Looking for the Gulf Motel? and, most recently, ?How to Love a Country.?

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

2019-11-27
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"Ame?rica" (parts IV-V) by Richard Blanco

Richard Blanco reads parts IV and V from his poem ?América?. Excerpted from the On Being episode ?Richard Blanco ? How to Love a Country?.

2019-11-27
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[Unedited] Richard Blanco with Krista Tippett

As a longtime civil engineer by day and a poet by night, Cuban American writer Richard Blanco has straddled the many ways a sense of place merges with human emotion to form the meaning of home and belonging. In 2013, he became the fifth poet to read at a presidential inauguration (he was also the youngest and the first immigrant). The thoughtfulness, elegance, and humor of Blanco?s poetry and his person captivated the crowd for this live conversation at the Chautauqua Institution. 

Richard Blanco practiced civil engineering for more than 20 years. He is now an associate professor of creative writing at his alma mater, Florida International University. His books of non-fiction and poetry include ?Looking for the Gulf Motel? and, most recently, ?How to Love a Country.?

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org. This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Richard Blanco ? How to Love a Country." Find more at onbeing.org.

2019-11-27
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Marilynne Robinson and Marcelo Gleiser ? The Mystery We Are

Novelist Marilynne Robinson and physicist Marcelo Gleiser are both passionate about the majesty of science, and they share a caution about what they call our modern ?piety? toward science. They connect thrilling dots among the current discoveries about the cosmos and the new territory of understanding our own minds. We brought them together for a joyous, heady discussion of the mystery we are.

Marcelo Gleiser is Appleton Professor of Natural Philosophy and a professor of physics and astronomy at Dartmouth College. He?s the author of The Dancing Universe, A Tear at the Edge of Creation, and, most recently, The Simple Beauty of the Unexpected: A Natural Philosopher?s Quest for Trout and the Meaning of Everything. He was awarded the 2019 Templeton Prize.

Marilynne Robinson is a professor emeritus of the University of Iowa Writers? Workshop. She?s the author of several novels, including Housekeeping, Home, and Gilead, which won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. Her works of nonfiction include Absence of Mind and, most recently, What Are We Doing Here?

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org. This show originally aired in January 2012.

2019-11-21
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[Unedited] Marilynne Robinson and Marcelo Gleiser with Krista Tippett

Novelist Marilynne Robinson and physicist Marcelo Gleiser are both passionate about the majesty of science, and they share a caution about what they call our modern ?piety? toward science. They connect thrilling dots among the current discoveries about the cosmos and the new territory of understanding our own minds. We brought them together for a joyous, heady discussion of the mystery we are.

Marcelo Gleiser is Appleton Professor of Natural Philosophy and a professor of physics and astronomy at Dartmouth College. He?s the author of The Dancing Universe, A Tear at the Edge of Creation, and, most recently, The Simple Beauty of the Unexpected: A Natural Philosopher?s Quest for Trout and the Meaning of Everything. He was awarded the 2019 Templeton Prize.

Marilynne Robinson is a professor emeritus of the University of Iowa Writers? Workshop. She?s the author of several novels, including Housekeeping, Home, and Gilead, which won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. Her works of nonfiction include Absence of Mind and, most recently, What Are We Doing Here?

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the 

On Being

 episode "Marilynne Robinson and Marcelo Gleiser ? The Mystery We Are." Find more at

 onbeing.org

. This show originally aired in January 2012.

2019-11-21
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Robert Macfarlane ? The Hidden Human Depths of the Underland

Robert Macfarlane is an explorer and linguist of landscape. His newest book, ?Underland: A Deep Time Journey,? is an odyssey that?s full of surprises ? from caves and catacombs under land, under cities, and under forests to the meltwater of Greenland. ?Since before we were Homo sapiens,? he writes, ?humans have been seeking out spaces of darkness in which to find and make meaning.? Darkness in the natural world and in human life, he suggests, is a medium of vision and descent, a movement toward revelation.

Robert Macfarlane is a reader in literature and the geohumanities at the University of Cambridge. His books include ?Mountains of the Mind,? ?The Old Ways,? ?Landmarks,? ?The Lost Words,? and, most recently, ?Underland: A Deep Time Journey.?

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

2019-11-14
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[Unedited] Robert Macfarlane with Krista Tippett

Robert Macfarlane is an explorer and linguist of landscape. His newest book, ?Underland: A Deep Time Journey,? is an odyssey that?s full of surprises ? from caves and catacombs under land, under cities, and under forests to the meltwater of Greenland. ?Since before we were Homo sapiens,? he writes, ?humans have been seeking out spaces of darkness in which to find and make meaning.? Darkness in the natural world and in human life, he suggests, is a medium of vision and descent, a movement toward revelation.

Robert Macfarlane is a reader in literature and the geohumanities at the University of Cambridge. His books include ?Mountains of the Mind,? ?The Old Ways,? ?Landmarks,? ?The Lost Words,? and, most recently, ?Underland: A Deep Time Journey.?

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the 

On Being

 episode "Robert Macfarlane ? The Hidden Human Depths of the Underland." Find more at

 onbeing.org

.

2019-11-14
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Joy Ladin ? Finding a Home in Yourself

For as far back as Joy Ladin can remember, her body didn?t match her soul. In her mid-40s, Ladin transitioned from male to female identity and later became the first openly transgender professor at an Orthodox Jewish institution. She admits the pain this caused for people and institutions she loved. And she knows what it is to move through the world with the assumed authority of a man and the assumed vulnerability of a woman. We take in what she?s learned about gender and the very syntax of being.

Joy Ladin is the David and Ruth Gottesman Chair in English at the Stern College for Women of Yeshiva University in New York. Her memoir is called ?Through the Door of Life: A Jewish Journey Between Genders.? She?s also the author of nine collections of poetry and most recently published the book ?The Soul of the Stranger: Reading God and Torah from a Transgender Perspective.?

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org. This interview originally aired in June 2013.

2019-11-07
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[Unedited] Joy Ladin with Krista Tippett

For as far back as Joy Ladin can remember, her body didn?t match her soul. In her mid-40s, Ladin transitioned from male to female identity and later became the first openly transgender professor at an Orthodox Jewish institution. She admits the pain this caused for people and institutions she loved. And she knows what it is to move through the world with the assumed authority of a man and the assumed vulnerability of a woman. We take in what she?s learned about gender and the very syntax of being.

Joy Ladin is the David and Ruth Gottesman Chair in English at the Stern College for Women of Yeshiva University in New York. Her memoir is called ?Through the Door of Life: A Jewish Journey Between Genders.? She?s also the author of nine collections of poetry and most recently published the book ?The Soul of the Stranger: Reading God and Torah from a Transgender Perspective.?

This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the 

On Being

 episode "Joy Ladin ? Finding a Home in Yourself." Find more at

 onbeing.org

. This interview originally aired in June 2013.

2019-11-07
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angel Kyodo williams ? The World Is Our Field of Practice

angel Kyodo williams is one of our wisest voices on social evolution and the spiritual aspect of social healing. She is an esteemed Zen priest and the second black woman recognized as a teacher in the Japanese Zen lineage. For those of us who are not monastics, she says, the world is our field of practice. To sink into conversation with her is to imagine and nourish the transformative potential of this moment toward human wholeness.

Reverend angel Kyodo williams is the founder of the national social justice organization Transformative Change. She?s the author of ?Being Black: Zen and the Art of Living with Fearlessness and Grace? and ?Radical Dharma: Talking Race, Love, and Liberation.?

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org. This interview originally aired in April 2018.

2019-10-31
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