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Consider This from NPR

Consider This from NPR

Make sense of the day. Every weekday afternoon, Kelly McEvers and the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered ? Ailsa Chang, Audie Cornish, Mary Louise Kelly and Ari Shapiro ? help you consider the major stories of the day in less than 15 minutes, featuring the reporting and storytelling resources of NPR.

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Episodes

Fauci Admits Government Fault On Masks; Celebrating July 4 Safely

Employers added 4.8 million jobs last month but the U.S. is still down 15 million jobs since February. And those new figures are from a survey before the recent surge in COVID-19 cases.

Coronavirus cases in the U.S. rose in part due to Memorial Day weekend celebrations, when people went out to beaches and restaurants. From a report by NPR's Allison Aubrey, experts share tips on how to safely celebrate the Fourth of July

There's been a lot of mixed messaging on masks. Dr. Anthony Fauci tells NPR the government could have done a better job early on. And NPR's Maria Godoy reports on how to choose the best mask for you.

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2020-07-02
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The Mask Debate Is Over; Fauci On Mandates, Vaccine Skepticism

As Arizona hits new records of coronavirus cases and deaths, the state announced they will pause their reopening plans.

More and more Republicans are speaking up in support of face masks. Even Vice President Mike Pence has been wearing one in public lately.

Dr. Anthony Fauci tells NPR the coronavirus surges we're seeing now are partly the result of too few people wearing masks. Fauci said it's especially hard to explain the risk to young people, because the virus has such a broad range of severity.

Plus, a group of scientists who wanted to make it easier to track the virus in your community created an online risk assessment map. NPR's Allison Aubrey and Carmel Wroth reported on the new tool.

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2020-07-01
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Gaps In The Russian Bounties Story; Fauci Warns Of 100k Cases A Day

Dr. Anthony Fauci told members of Congress Tuesday that although he can't predict the ultimate number of coronavirus cases in the United States, he "would not be surprised if we go up to 100,000 a day if this does not turn around."

The New York Times reported that Russian military intelligence offered money to the the Taliban in exchange for killing American troops in Afghanistan. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly spoke with Aaron O'Connell, a Marine Corp veteran who served on the National Security Council, about Russia's possible motives.

Coronavirus testing in the U.S. is up, but not up enough. Public health researchers say only a handful of states are testing at the level needed to suppress the virus.
To see how your state is doing with testing, go to NPR's tracker.

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2020-06-30
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After SCOTUS Decision, The Future Of Abortion Rights; Mask Mandates

On Monday, the Supreme Court issued a major decision on access to abortion. The court struck down a Louisiana law that required doctors who perform abortions at clinics to also have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals. NPR's Sarah McCammon reported from the clinic at the center of the case last year.

With coronavirus cases surging in North Carolina, officials issued a statewide mandate for face coverings, and are hiring bilingual contact tracers to work with the state's Latinx community.

Warehouses are a big source of temporary jobs in New Jersey, especially for undocumented immigrants. Workers often have to travel in crowded vans, despite guidelines to social distance. Now, WNYC's Karen Yi reports, some of them are getting sick.

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2020-06-29
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Stay Tuned For 'Consider This'

On Monday, June 29th, the name of this show will change to 'Consider This from NPR.'

You don't need to re-subscribe. All our existing episodes will still be right here.

Even though our name is changing, we will still be a place where you can get the latest news about this pandemic. And we'll bring you some other news, too.

Thanks for listening!

Questions? Email us: [email protected]
2020-06-27
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White House Task Force Briefing Is Back; Texas Emergency Rooms Are Filling Up

COVID-19 cases are at an all-time high in the U.S. And for the first time in almost two months, The White House Coronavirus Task Force had a televised briefing.

In Texas on Thursday, 6,000 new cases of the coronavirus were reported. An ER doctor in Houston says beds are filling up and they are running out of places to send patients.

Some states are closing down bars and restaurants, again, as COVID-19 cases continue to rise. But NPR's Scott Horsley explains that customer traffic has already been dropping for days.

Even now, it can still be tough to get a coronavirus test especially, as NPR's Kirk Siegler reports, in tribal communities.

Plus, with many movie theatres closed, the films topping the box office are a bit ... retro.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-06-26
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Mask Debate Heats Up; Creating A Vaccine For A Mutating Virus

Just two months ago, the Northeast was the epicenter of the pandemic in the U.S. On Wednesday, there were just 581 new reported cases of the coronavirus in New York and now visitors from other states are expected to quarantine after they arrive.

More Governors across the country are touting the benefits of masks but not all are willing to make wearing them a state policy.

NPR's Jon Hamilton reports that scientists are closely tracking mutations in the coronavirus to ensure the changes don't complicate a future vaccine.

Plus, COVID-19 has presented particular challenges for women and reproductive health. Many say that the pandemic is causing them to rethink their plans to have children.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-06-25
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The Pandemic Isn't Over: Nearly 10 Million Coronavirus Cases Worldwide

Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the WHO, started Wednesday's coronavirus briefing on a somber note: By next week there will be a total of 10 million cases globally. A reminder, says Ghebreyesus, that the pandemic isn't over, despite places around the world reopening.

There's been a lot of news about coronavirus spikes in states like Texas and Florida. But not in Georgia. Why? Georgia Public Broadcasting reporter Grant Blankenship has more.

And we talk to a public health official in Washington State scrambling to identify hotspots in her community.

America can't fully get back to work without childcare, and many children are suffering without social opportunities. But how to reopen schools, camps and daycares safely? NPR's Anya Kamenetz talks to childcare centers that have stayed open on how they've been trying to keep kids and staff safe.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-06-24
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Fauci Fact-Checks Trump On Testing

Wearing a face mask, with hand sanitizer and Lysol wipes close at hand, Dr. Anthony Fauci testified before the House Tuesday, to explain why the U.S. still struggles to get a handle on the coronavirus.

On Saturday, the U.S. reported 32,411 new cases in just that one day.

Fauci also countered President Trump's claim that more testing is "a double-edged sword" to blame for the rise in coronavirus cases across the country. Instead, Fauci says testing is essential if we want to get control of the virus.

And NPR's Lauren Frayer takes us to India, where the health care system is collapsing under the heavy demand caused by COVID-19.

Plus ? for the past three months, just about everyone who can work from home has. And for the most part, things seem to be working. So, as NPR's Uri Berliner reports, more and more employers are looking to make the move permanent.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-06-23
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Florida Passes 100,000 Cases; More Young People Are Testing Positive

Florida passed a grim milestone: 100,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases. The latest numbers include a lot of people in their 20s and 30s. Some officials are putting a pause on reopening.

The Trump administration has started shipping out supplies needed to ensure sufficient testing. But those supplies haven't always been very helpful and in some cases they've been hazardous. NPR's Rob Stein has the details.

Iowa is home to some 10,000 refugees from Myanmar. The coronavirus has been especially hard on them, with estimates saying as many as 70% have contracted the virus. As Iowa Public Radio's Kate Payne reports, many in the Burmese community work at local meatpacking plants, where social distancing is a constant challenge.

Preparing to visit family in long-term care facilities? NPR's Allison Aubrey has some tips to keep everyone safe.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-06-22
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The President's Indoor Rally; Rise In Cases Not Explained By More Testing

COVID-19 cases are on the rise in some states ? and more testing isn't the only explanation.

Find out how cases are in your community.

Today is Juneteenth. On this day in 1865, U.S. Army troops landed in Galveston, Texas to tell some of the last enslaved Americans they were free. More American businesses are recognizing the holiday this year.

President Trump was planning on holding a rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma today. Instead, thousands will be gathering to see the President tomorrow ? indoors. And as NPR's Tamera Keith reports, public health officials aren't thrilled.

Plus, Germany has been able to slow the spread of the coronavirus with the help of an army of contact tracers working around the clock. NPR's Rob Schmitz has more.

Yesterday, the Supreme Court upheld Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals (DACA). NPR's Code Switch spoke with one of the plaintiffs in the case about how she's processing the news.You can find Code Switch on Spotify, Apple Podcasts and NPR One.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-06-19
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Restaurants Are Closing. Again.

The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that the Trump administration's plan to end DACA ? Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals ? was "arbitrary and capricious." The ruling is welcome news for recipients of the program, some of whom are essential workers on the front lines of the fight against COVID-19.

As areas reopen, officials are working to ensure businesses are adopting safety precautions to avoid the spread of the coronavirus. Officials in Los Angeles found that half of the restaurants they surveyed violated rules and safety standards.

Plus, NPR's Selena Simmons-Duffin with an update on which communities across the country have sufficient staff in place for contact tracing. Check out the state-by-state breakdown here.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-06-18
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Which Masks Are Better; The Rich Aren't Spending (And That's Hurting The Economy)

While President Trump wants to celebrate an uptick in retail sales as states reopen, there's still a long way to go before the economy is back on track. Part of the problem is that the wealthiest Americans are saving their cash rather than spending it.

More and more people are leaving their home without a face covering, but experts tell NPR's Maria Godoy they really do help ? some more than others.

There has been growing support of the Black Lives Matter movement among white Americans. But why now? Police brutality isn't new. Gene Demby of NPR's Code Switch podcast explains what the pandemic might have to do with it.

Listen to "Why Now, White People?" on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or NPR One.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-06-17
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Isolation Causes Loneliness. What Else Can It Do To Our Bodies?

There's a cost to staying home, too. Julianne Holt-Lunstad, a neuroscientist and social psychologist at Brigham Young University, explains the toll that social isolation can take.

It's been exactly three months since President Trump issued the first national guidelines for social distancing, including pausing nursing home visitors.

NPR's Ashley Westerman recently checked in on her 100-year-old grandfather. Paul Westerman's wife of 76 years is in hospice care. He's alone, except for the nurses in his veteran's home.

Plus NPR's Chris Arnold checks in on a Boston hair stylist going back to work.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-06-16
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There Is No 'Second Wave.' The U.S. Is Still Stuck In The First One

Nationwide, numbers were never trending downward in any big way. Now in some states that are reopening, they are going up. Oregon and Arizona are two of those places. Each state is taking a different approach.

Testing is more available than ever before. Some cities are urging people who don't feel sick to get a test, just as a precaution. But WPLN's Blake Farmer reports some insurance companies won't pay for the cost of a test unless it's "medically necessary."

Due to the pandemic, a lot of states are making it easier to vote by mail. NPR's Miles Parks says this new process could mean waiting a lot longer for elections results come November.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-06-15
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What We Don't Know About Potential Vaccines; Protest Safety

All week we've been hearing about rising cases in states around the country. The stock market reacted on Thursday, in part after Federal Reserve officials predicted the unemployment rate will still be above 9% at the end of the year.

There's a lot we don't know about the White House's public-private partnership to develop a vaccine, Operation Warp Speed. NPR's Sydney Lupkin reports on a winnowing field of vaccine candidates.

And during a pandemic, the most vulnerable newborns require even more protection.

Plus, NPR's Maria Godoy shares tips to minimize the risks of COVID-19 for yourself and others if you've been out protesting.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-06-12
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Masks Are Even More Important Than We Thought

Many states that reopened a few weeks ago are seeing spikes in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. In Arizona, officials say if cases continue to rise, they may have to be more aggressive about enforcing reopening protocols for businesses.

In major cities across Texas there are disparities in access to COVID-19 testing, resulting in less testing in black neighborhoods than white neighborhoods.

Dr. Atul Gawande spoke with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly about why face masks remain essential in dealing with the coronavirus and the efficacy of different masks.

To help with shortages of PPE, one volunteer group has used 3D printers at home to make nearly 40,000 NIH-approved face shields for health care workers and first responders.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-06-11
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Numbers Steady, Hundreds More Dead Each Day; The Cost Of Opening Schools

The numbers aren't really changing. 20,000 new cases a day, and more than 800 dead. Experts warn that by fall, in America, the death count could rise to 200,000.

Some members of the National Guard who were sent to Washington D.C. during the protests over the death of George Floyd have tested positive for the coronavirus. Dr. Anthony Fauci is concerned ? but not surprised.

Many nursing homes banned all visitors and nonessential workers from their facilities to stop the spread of COVID-19. Some advocates and families say they want that ban to end.

A big unanswered question is whether it will be safe for public K-12 schools to reopen safely in the fall. The U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions held a hearing on the topic Wednesday.

Plus, the Mall of America reopened after nearly three months.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-06-10
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Kids And COVID-19; Mixed Messages On Asymptomatic Spread

George Floyd's killing by police sparked protests around the world. Because of the coronavirus, attendance at Floyd's Houston funeral was limited and mourners were encouraged to wear masks.

People of color have been hit hard by the coronavirus because of risk factors including chronic health conditions and less access to health care. Experts say scientists need better data on who's getting sick and public health officials need to communicate better with communities of color.

A top official from the World Health Organization walked back a statement Monday in which she said transmission from asymptomatic carriers of the virus is "very rare."

A small but growing number of kids have a dangerous reaction to coronavirus called multi-inflammatory syndrome, which can cause inflamed hearts, lungs and other organs.

Plus, one man built an art piece he calls a 'Doorway To Imagination' in his social distancing-created free time.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-06-09
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New York Reopening; Hindsight On Sweden's Lack of Lockdown

After a nearly three-month lockdown and over 20,000 coronavirus-related deaths, New York City is taking its first steps to reopen parts of its economy amid protests over police brutality.

The coronavirus is surviving the heat and humidity despite initial hopes it would not last through the summer. Experts now think the coronavirus will be here for years to come.

Sweden's government implemented limited restrictions in an attempt to protect the country's economy during the pandemic. Now, they're seeing mixed results.

And for the first time in months, the massive Vatican Museums are open.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-06-08
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Surprising Job Gains Are Good News ? But Not For Everyone

Editor's note: In this episode, we mispronounced the name of professor Sven-Eric Jordt.

It looks like another weekend of protests across the country. And that means more people could be exposed to tear gas, pepper spray and other "chemical irritants" that trigger ? among other things ? coughing and sneezing. Two things people are trying to avoid during this pandemic.

Americans are skipping payments on mortgages, auto loans and other bills due to the economic impact of the pandemic. And as NPR's Chris Arnold reports, for some, catching up is going to be painful.

Plus, the coronavirus has hit people of color especially hard. As Harvard's David Williams writes in an article for the Washington Post, before COVID-19, Black Americans were already struggling with the health effects of everyday discrimination. The pandemic is only making it worse.

And NPR's Short Wave team takes us to San Francisco where Hispanics and Latinxs make up 46% of all coronavirus cases ?? but they make up just 15% of the population.

Don't forget to check out Short Wave on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-06-05
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Phase III Vaccine Trials Could Start In July

It's been 96 days since the first person in America was reported to have died of COVID-19. And for the first time, the federal government will require states to keep track of who's getting sick and who's dying based on their age, sex, and race and ethnicity.

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Around the world, 10 vaccine candidates have begun human trials.

COVID-19 has killed nearly 110,000 people in America. And black Americans are dying at nearly two and half times the rate of white Americans. As NPR's Stacey Vanek Smith and Greg Rosalsky report on the economic reasons why.

Plus, WAMU reporter Jacob Fenston reports on 85-year-old Margaret Sullivan, who feels like she's been "living in a bubble" since the start of the pandemic.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-06-04
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Fauci's New Vaccine Hopes For 2021; A Pandemic Election

Eight states and the District of Columbia went to the polls Tuesday. More mail-in ballots and fewer in-person polling places caused long delays in some places, highlighting the challenges for the November elections.

KUT's Ashley Lopez reports, since naturalization ceremonies have been halted due to the pandemic, thousands who were due to become U.S. citizens over the last few weeks are now in limbo.

Public health workers are encountering resistance, online harassment and even violent threats as they conduct contact tracing and other containment strategies in their local communities. NPR's Will Stone has more.

Plus, a visit to the Six Feet Away Museum in Jacksonville, Florida, and an update on a coronavirus vaccine.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-06-03
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The Coronavirus In America: One More Racial Inequity

The more we learn about the coronavirus, the clearer it becomes that it's disproportionately affecting communities of color. And as protests continue across the country, some health experts worry that the hardest hit areas could be in for another wave of cases.

By almost every economic measure, black Americans have a harder time getting a leg up. As the pandemic has sent the country's economy into the worst downturn in generations, it's only gotten worse. More from NPR's Scott Horsley and the team at NPR's Planet Money.

Despite all of this, there is a bit of good news. Some communities across the country are reporting a decrease in COVID-19 cases. NPR's Rob Stein breaks down the national outlook.

Plus, advice on how to combat anxiety, avoid insomnia and get some rest.

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You can find more sleep tips on NPR's Life Kit on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-06-02
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Protesting In A Pandemic; The Fight Over Mail-In Voting

The coronavirus pandemic has collided with protests all over the country over police brutality and the deaths of George Floyd in Minneapolis and many other black Americans.

Now public health officials are concerned for the health of protesters. Atlanta mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms even encouraged protesters in her city to get tested.

NPR's Pam Fessler reports the legal fight between Democrats and Republicans over mail-in voting has intensified ever since the pandemic hit.

Listen to Short Wave's episode about what we will ?? and won't ?? remember about the pandemic on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-06-01
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Q & A: Voting And Acts Of Kindness

Bestselling author Cheryl Strayed joins NPR's Ari Shaprio as listeners share stories about acts of kindness they've experienced.

These excerpts come from NPR's nightly radio show about the coronavirus crisis, The National Conversation. In this episode:

-NPR reporter Miles Parks answers questions about how upcoming elections can be run safely.

-Cheryl Strayed, bestselling author of 'Wild' and host of the podcast Sugar Calling, joins NPR host Ari Shapiro to hear listeners' stories about acts of kindness during the pandemic.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-05-30
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The Rural/Urban Divide; Safe Summer Activities

Democrats want another coronavirus relief bill. A sticking point for Republicans is $600 a week in federal unemployment benefits ? which means some workers have been able to collect more money on unemployment than they did in their previous jobs.

Essential workers who have continued to work may have received temporary wage bumps. But NPR's Alina Selyukh reports many companies are ending that hazard pay.

Challenges to statewide stay-at-home orders are mounting in rural communities that have few coronavirus cases. NPR's Kirk Siegler reports on the dispute in Baker County, Oregon.

Plus, experts weigh in on the safety of different summer activities.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-05-29
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Why Are Some Countries Doing Better Than Others?

A new study suggests the coronavirus is both more common and less deadly than it first appeared, NPR's Jon Hamilton reports.

From NPR's Joel Rose: a shortage of machines to process tests is the latest bottleneck in the pandemic supply chain.

Certain countries like New Zealand, Germany and several nations in Asia have been successful in controlling the coronvavirus. NPR's Jason Beaubien reports on how leadership played a strong role.

Mara Gay is 33-years-old, lives in New York City and got sick with COVID-19 in April. She spoke with NPR's Michel Martin about her long recovery process, despite being young and healthy.

Plus, two teenagers who were looking forward to competing in the Scripps National Spelling Bee, which was cancelled this week.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-05-28
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Global Vaccine Competition; More Than 100,000 Dead

According to Johns Hopkins University, more than 100,000 people have died in the United States from COVID-19, and experts at the World Health Organization warn a second peak of COVID-19 infections could occur during this first wave of the virus. Meanwhile, the global race for a vaccine is generating competition between nations, mainly the U.S. and China.

New numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reveal more than 60,000 health care workers have been infected with COVID-19, and almost 300 have died. This is a dramatic increase since the CDC first released numbers six weeks ago.

Bangladesh has extended its coronavirus lockdown ? except for the garment factories. But with big brands canceling orders, workers face pay cuts, hunger and little to no social distancing.

Plus, an obituary writer reflects on COVID-19 deaths.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-05-27
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99,000 People Dead And A Dire Summer Prediction

As the United States nears 100,000 coronavirus deaths and states begin to re-open, what's next for the country? Dr. Ashish Jha of Harvard's Global Health Institute cautions it's still early in the crisis.

Researchers have found the coronavirus was introduced to the U.S. in part by affluent travelers ? but those weren't the people hit the hardest.

Cathy Cody owns a janitorial company in a Georgia community with a high rate of COVID-19. Her company offers a new service boxing up the belongings of residents who have died. Read or listen to the full story from NPR's Morning Edition.

Plus, rollerblading is having a moment.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-05-26
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The Cost Of Being "Essential"

From NPR's Embedded: The workers who produce pork, chicken, and beef in plants around the country have been deemed "essential" by the government and their employers. Now, the factories where they work have become some of the largest clusters for the coronavirus in the country. The workers, many of whom are immigrants, say their bosses have not done enough to protect them.

Regular episodes return tomorrow.

This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-05-25
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Q & A: Vaccine Development And Kids' Questions

NPR Science Correspondent Joe Palca answers listener questions about vaccine development, and medical experts tackle questions sent in by kids.

These excerpts come from NPR's nightly radio show about the coronavirus crisis, The National Conversation. In this episode:

-NPR Science Correspondent Joe Palca explains how vaccines are made and the unique challenges associated with COVID-19.

-Kids' questions are answered by pediatric nurse practitioner Suzannah Stivison from the Capitol Medical Group in Washington, D.C., and Dr. Wanjiku Njoroge, medical director for the Young Child Clinic at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-05-23
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Fauci Optimistic On Vaccine; What's Different About Military Homecomings

Earlier this week, an experimental coronavirus vaccine showed promise. But, for the moment, the full data from that research hasn't been released.

Friday morning, Dr. Anthony Fauci told NPR he's seen the data and it looks "quite promising." According to Fauci, barring any setbacks, the US is on track to have a vaccine by early next year.

Millions of Americans are turning to food banks to help feed their families during the pandemic. A new federal program pays farmers who've lost restaurant and school business to donate the excess to community organizations. But even the people in charge of these organizations say direct cash assistance is a better way to feed Americans in need.

A few months ago, before the lock downs, nearly 3,000 paratroopers of the 82nd Airborne Division left on a short-notice deployment to the Middle East. The 82nd is coming back is being welcomed back to a changed nation and a changed military.

Plus, about 180 people are hunkered down together in a Jerusalem hotel, recovering from COVID-19. Patients from all walks of life ? Israelis, Palestinians, religious, secular groups that don't usually mix ? are all getting along. Listen to the full Rough Translation podcast "Hotel Corona."

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-05-22
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Optimism For A Vaccine; Strapped Unemployment Offices Leave Many Waiting

A new analysis from Columbia University says that roughly 36,000 people could've been saved if the United States had started social distancing just one week earlier. But that all hinges on whether people would have been willing to stay home.

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Research with mice, guinea pigs and monkeys is making scientists increasingly optimistic about the chances for developing a COVID-19 vaccine. Three studies released Wednesday show promising results after the animals received experimental vaccines. But public health success will require global cooperation.

Meanwhile, state unemployment agencies are feeling the pinch as they try to keep up with unparalleled demand for their services.

And as bordering towns begin to ease stay-at-home restrictions, the logistics around reopening neighboring areas is leading to quite a bit of confusion.

Plus, sometimes you just need a hug. And if you're isolating alone, TikTok star Tabitha Brown has got you covered with comfort content to help you feel loved.

This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-05-21
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What Contact Tracing Tells Us About High-Risk Activities

Three-quarters of Americans are concerned that a second wave of coronavirus cases will emerge, a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds. Despite that, groups around the country, including in Michigan, are protesting state lockdowns.

President Trump's stance on hydroxychloroquine has made the drug harder to study, according to some scientists.

Researchers have been digging into contact tracing data from countries that had early outbreaks. Data suggest high risk activities include large indoor gatherings. Lower risk is going to the grocery store.

Plus, what is happening with classroom pets when school is out of session due to the coronavirus. Reporter Sara Stacke's story with photos.

You can hear more about the NPR poll on the NPR Politics Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-05-20
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Indoor Spread, Workers' Anxieties, And Our Warped Sense Of Time

There are still a lot of questions about how the coronavirus is transmitted through air. Researchers are looking at how the virus is spread indoors and how to safely have people under one roof.

As states around the country lift restrictions and businesses reopen, many workers in close-contact jobs are scared for their health and would rather stay on unemployment. NPR's Chris Arnold reports on what options workers have.

Listen to Short Wave's episode about why it's so hard to remember what day it is and some tips for giving time more meaning on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-05-19
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Encouraging Vaccine News; Pandemic Grows More Political

A new coronavirus vaccine candidate shows encouraging results. It's early, but preliminary data shows it appears to be eliciting the kind of immune response capable of preventing disease.

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell has been signaling that more government spending might be necessary to prevent long-term economic damage.

As the pandemic becomes more political, researchers are concerned debates over masks, social distancing and reopening the economy are inflaming an already divided nation. Incidents of violence are rare, but concerning to experts.

Plus, a 102-year-old woman who survived the influenza of 1918, the Great Depression, World War II and now, COVID-19.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-05-18
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Q & A: Sleep Problems And Summer Childcare

Sleep experts answer listener questions about insomnia, and a nurse practitioner offers advice to parents about summer childcare.

These excerpts come from NPR's nightly radio show about the coronavirus crisis, 'The National Conversation with All Things Considered.' In this episode:

- Dr. Sonia Ancoli-Israel of the Center for Circadian Biology, and Dr. Christina McCrae of the Mizzou Sleep Research Lab offer advice to listeners who are having trouble falling asleep.
- Pediatric nurse practitioner Suzannah Stivison answers parents' questions about childcare this summer.

If you have a question, you can share it at npr.org/nationalconversation, or tweet with the hashtag, #NPRConversation.

We'll return with a regular episode of Coronavirus Daily on Monday.

This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-05-16
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The Government's Vaccine Push; Businesses Struggle With Reopening Rules

To speed up the process of developing a coronavirus vaccine, the Trump Administration says the government will invest in manufacturing the top candidates even before one is proven to work.

As parts of the country reopen, different rules apply across state and even city lines, leaving business owners trying to figure things out for themselves, 'All Things Considered' host Ari Shapiro reports.

Demand for goods and services plunged in April according to new data. NPR's Stacey Vanek Smith of The Indicator reports on pent-up demand and what that means for the future of the U.S. economy.

The Navajo Nation has one of the highest rates of COVID-19 deaths per capita in the United States. NPR's Code Switch podcast examines why Native Americans have been so hard hit by the coronavirus. Listen to their episode on race and COVID-19 on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.

Listen to Throughline's episode about the origins of the N95 mask on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-05-15
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Whistleblower: U.S. Lost Valuable Time, Warns Of 'Darkest Winter In Modern History'

Career government scientist-turned-whistleblower Rick Bright testified before Congress Thursday that without a stronger federal response to the coronavirus, 2020 could be the "darkest winter in modern history."

Schools might not open everywhere in the fall, but some experts say keeping kids home is a health risk, too.

Apple and Google want to develop technology to track the spread of COVID-19 while protecting individuals' privacy, while some states like North Dakota are developing their own apps.

Plus, tips on social distancing from someone who's been doing it for 50 years: Billy Barr's movie recommendations spreadsheet.

Listen to the NPR Politics Podcast's recap of today's hearing on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.

Send your remembrance of a loved one to [email protected].

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-05-14
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Public Health Vs. Politics; Lessons From An Anti-Mask Protest

The U.S. has more coronavirus deaths than any country in the world. Dr. Anthony Fauci says the number of American fatalities is likely an under count.

Nearly 40% of households making less than $40,000 a year lost a job in March. Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said on Wednesday that additional government spending may be necessary to avoid long-lasting economic fallout.

A small but vocal minority of people are pushing back against public health measures that experts say are life-saving. It's not the first time Americans have resisted government measures during a pandemic. Listen to Embedded's episode on the backlash on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.

President Trump has prioritized getting sports running again after the coronavirus lockdown. But NPR's Scott Detrow reports the idea is facing logistical and safety challenges.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-05-13
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Testing, Reopening Schools, Vaccines: Fauci And Others Testify

In a Senate committee hearing on Tuesday, Chair Lamar Alexander of Tennessee asked Dr. Anthony Fauci whether coronavirus treatments or a vaccine could be developed in time to allow college students to return to school in the fall. Fauci said that "would be a bridge too far."

There's a full recap of today's hearing on The NPR Politics Podcast. listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.

New York is trying to build what could become one of the largest contact tracing programs for COVID-19. Starting this month, public health officials there are looking to hire as many as 17,000 investigators.

Nursing homes account for nearly half of COVID-19 deaths in some states. NPR's Ina Jaffe reports on why nursing homes have been so vulnerable to the virus and what could be done to improve them in the future.

Plus, a professional musician sidelined by the coronavirus becomes a one-man marching band for his neighborhood.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-05-12
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How To Stay Safe As States Reopen; The Latest on Masks

Democrats want another stimulus plan, but Treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin says the Trump administration wants to wait before providing any further aid.

As more states ease stay-at-home orders, NPR's Allison Aubrey reports on ways to stay safe while seeing friends, going to church and returning to work. The CDC still recommends people wear masks.

The coronavirus pandemic has had a disproportionately large effect on black Americans. Lawmakers and local officials are looking for ways to make sure the communities hit hardest are getting the right information about the virus.

In Life Kit's latest episode, Sesame Street's Grover answers kids' questions about the coronavirus on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-05-11
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Q & A: Home Cooking And Environmental Impact

Chef Samin Nosrat, author of 'Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat,' answers listener cooking questions. NPR's science correspondent discusses the pandemic's environmental impact.

These excerpts come from NPR's nightly radio show about the coronavirus crisis, 'The National Conversation with All Things Considered.' In this episode:

- NPR Science Desk correspondent Lauren Sommer talks about the environmental impact of the economic slowdown
- Samin Nosrat, author and host of the Netflix series 'Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat,' offers inspiration to those who find themselves short on ingredients or cooking for one

If you have a question, you can share it at npr.org/nationalconversation, or tweet with the hashtag, #NPRConversation.

We'll return with a regular episode of Coronavirus Daily on Monday.

This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-05-09
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Antibodies And Immunity; Why Even Health Care Workers Are Losing Jobs

Most people infected with the coronavirus develop antibodies in response. NPR's Richard Harris reports that scientists are trying to figure out if that means people who've been exposed are immune from reinfection and, if so, for how long.

The Labor Department reported 20.5 million jobs were lost in April, putting the jobless rate at its highest level since the Great Depression.

Health care workers are among those hard hit by the economy. Many are losing work as hospitals struggle financially due to a decrease in non-emergency visits and procedures.

Only a few states have enough tests to ensure safe reopening. One of them, Tennessee, has taken a unique approach to testing: Its state government pays for every single test, no questions asked.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-05-08
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Track Your State's Testing; What A Possible Mutation Means

Testing for the coronavirus is still falling short in many places in the U.S. How is your state doing? Track it using a tool from NPR.

A mutated strain of the coronavirus may have helped it spread more widely, according to a new preliminary study that's getting a lot of attention even before it's peer-reviewed.

Despite Trump administration claims that the coronavirus may have accidentally escaped from a lab in China, scientists it's more likely the coronavirus spread naturally. Listen to Short Wave's episode about why, on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One, and explore a second episode about the likelihood the virus originated in bats.

One of the deadliest outbreaks of the coronavirus has been at the Holyoke Soldiers' Home in Massachusetts. Officials are investigating what happened there.

Plus, experiments are undeway to see if dogs can be trained to sniff out the coronavirus. Meanwhile, U.S. animal shelters have reported having all their dogs fostered during the lock down.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-05-07
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More Americans Are Getting Tested, But Experts Warn Of Second Wave

The White House Coronavirus Task Force is not disbanding, but instead shifting its focus to "opening up our country," according to President Trump.

Testing in the U.S. has been rising steadily, but experts say more is still needed and the US should be prepared for a second wave.

Several states are allowing restaurants to reopen and dining to resume, with limited capacity. Owners are struggling to figure out how they can reopen and turn a profit during the pandemic.

The United Kingdom now has the second most lives lost to the coronavirus pandemic, behind the United States. NPR's Frank Langfitt reports on what's happening in Britain.

Plus, an 11-year-old wrote a letter to thank her mail carrier. Postal workers from all over the country responded.

Share a remembrance if you've lost a loved one to the coronavirus at npr.org/frontlineworkers

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-05-06
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When To See A Doctor; Policing During The Pandemic

California, one of the first states to shutdown, joins a growing list of states that are trying to restart their economies. Customers around the country are deciding if they are comfortable starting to shop again.

Law enforcement is adapting to what it means to police during a pandemic.

A fever and dry cough are no longer the only official symptoms of COVID-19. NPR's Maria Godoy has tips for when even milder symptoms, like headaches and loss of smell and taste, should prompt you to seek testing.

Plus, scientists on a research vessel in Arctic have been isolated from the coronavirus. Some are anticipating what it will be like to return to a society in lock down.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-05-05
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New Cases Plateau For Now As States Chart Their Own Course

One model forecast 60,000 Americans would die from COVID-19 by August. But fatalities keep rising, and the United States has surpassed that number.

Around the country, different states are taking different approaches to reopening. Donald Kettl, professor of public policy at the University of Texas at Austin, says this pandemic has brought up questions about federalism.

Few online grocery delivery services accept payments from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, also known as SNAP. That causes problems for recipients at high risk for COVID-19.

Plus, NPR's reporter in Nairobi finds his parents connecting with his kids through TikTok.

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This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-05-04
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Q & A: Dentists, Reopening Businesses, And Contact Tracing

A dentist, epidemiologist and NPR journalists answer listener questions on 'The National Conversation with All Things Considered,' NPR's nightly radio show about the coronavirus crisis. Excerpted here:

- NPR's senior business editor Uri Berliner and epidemiologist Dr. Jennifer Nuzzo discuss reopening nonessential businesses
- NPR's health policy reporter Selena Simmons-Duffin on the logistics of contact tracing
- Dentist Dr. Suhail Mohiuddin on when a dental problem is urgent enough for an in-person visit

If you have a question, you can share it at npr.org/nationalconversation, or tweet with the hashtag, #NPRConversation.

We'll return with a regular episode of Coronavirus Daily on Monday.

This episode was recorded and published as part of this podcast's former 'Coronavirus Daily' format.
2020-05-02
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