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Consider This from NPR

Consider This from NPR

Every weekday afternoon, the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you in 15 minutes. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.

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Episodes

BONUS: 'We Already Belong'

"To Asian women, not for?there's no speaking for us, splendidly vast and manifold as our people are." So writes Korean-American novelist R.O. Kwon in an essay in Vanity Fair. The essay explores the reasons that R.O. was unable to talk openly with her own mother about rising anti-Asian rhetoric and violence in the past year, and how she finally broke that silence. In this episode, Rough Translation producer Justine Yan talks with R.O. about what the essay meant to her, and how to break familiar silences surrounding Asian American communities.
2021-04-11
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As Anti-Trans Bills Advance, Trans Journalists Weigh In On 'Privilege' Of Reporting

This week Arkansas became the first state to outlaw gender-affirming health care for transgender youth, as the state legislature overrode a veto by Republican Gov. Asa Hutchinson. Hutchinson tells NPR why he opposed the bill, which will become law later this summer.

Dr. Joshua Safer, the executive director at Mount Sinai's Center for Transgender Medicine and Surgery, explains why gender-affirming therapies ? such as puberty blockers or hormone treatment ? are safe and healthy for trans youth.

Misconceptions about trans people can be shaped by who tells their stories. Three trans journalists weigh in on how that should be done:

Imara Jones is the creator of TransLash Media.
Kate Sosin is a reporter at The 19th.
Orion Rummler is a reporter at Axios.

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2021-04-09
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Within Biden's Infrastructure Plan Lies An Agenda To Address Climate Change

The details in President Biden's proposed $2 trillion infrastructure plan have a lot to do with protecting the environment. There's a new clean electricity standard and a focus on low-income communities hit hardest by climate change. But will it be enough?

NPR's Danielle Kurtzleben reports on how some progressives in congress wished Biden's plan was more ambitious. While many republicans, like Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, see it as an overreach and have vowed to fight it.

Dr. Leah Stokes, a professor in the department of political science at the University of California, Santa Barbara, says that she'd favor a quicker timeline but still thinks Biden's plan will go a long way for curbing the effects of climate change.

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2021-04-08
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Amid Record Pandemic Travel, What's Safe? And The Debate Over Vaccine Passports

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's mixed messaging on travel reveals the uncertain future of the pandemic, Dr. Monica Gandhi tells NPR. Gandhi is an infectious disease expert at the University of California San Francisco.

In the future, some travelers may be required to verify their vaccine status to enter a stadium or attend a wedding. Dr. Zeke Emanuel, a professor of medical ethics at the University of Pennsylvania and former member of President Biden's Transition COVID-19 Advisory Board, tells NPR so-called vaccine "passports" can be made secure and private.

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2021-04-07
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The Housing Market Is Wild Right Now ? And It's Making Inequality Worse

Home prices are soaring around the U.S. Amid low inventory and historically low interest rates, some buyers are hitting the market to find they can't compete with all-cash offers, or bidding wars that escalate well out of their price range.

Sean Hawksford in Bozeman, Mont., is one of those buyers. He told his story to NPR's daily economic podcast, The Indicator.

NPR's Chris Arnold explains why the market is so wild right now.

And while homebuying is a big financial decision, it's also an emotional one. Those emotions are on full display in a new Netflix show called Marriage or Mortgage. Michelle Singletary, a personal finance columnist for The Washington Post explores what the show reveals about the homebuying process, and why ? in more ways than one ? it's not for everyone. Here's her recent column about the show.

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2021-04-06
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How The Pandemic Has Changed Worship In America And The Debate Over Religious Freedom

Two Easters have now come and gone since the pandemic began, and the need for restrictions has not gone away. It has faith communities wondering when things will get back to normal. NPR's Lee Hale reports on how faith leaders have approached worship differently since the pandemic began.
2021-04-05
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'It Hurts People': How Trans Youth Are Being Targeted By State Legislation

Bills under consideration in dozens of states target trans youth by focusing on two things: health care and sports. Some bills have already become law in states including South Dakota, Mississippi, Tennessee, Arkansas and Alabama.

One of the harshest measures is an Alabama, where a bill would make it a felony to provide gender-affirming therapy to anyone under the age of 19. NPR's Melissa Block reports on what that would mean for one trans teenager and his family.

University of Pittsburgh professor Jules Gill-Peterson explains what she's uncovered about the history of trans youth in America. She is the author of Histories of the Transgender Child.

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2021-04-02
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High School Seniors Ask, 'What Will College Look Like Next Fall?'

The COVID-19 vaccine rollout is giving us all hope that we'll be back to some sense of normal soon, but the pandemic will likely still play a role in what college life looks like next fall.

We asked some high school seniors what questions they have about deciding where to go to school and what college life is like during a pandemic.

To help with answering those questions and sharing some advice, we hear from two current college freshmen, Ayiana Davis Polen at Spelman College in Atlanta and Adam Ahmad at the University of California, Berkeley, and NPR reporter Elissa Nadworny.

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2021-04-01
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Race To Immunize Tightens As Cases Rise; Promising Vaccine News Released

Scientists are growing concerned the U.S. may be headed for a fourth wave. COVID-19 cases are rising rapidly, mirroring an increase in many countries around the world.

Harvard epidemiologist Bill Hanage tells NPR he's worried another surge in the U.S. will fuel the spread of the variant known as B.1.1.7.

In the meantime, there's new evidence that vaccines from Pfizer and Moderna are effective at preventing viral spread ? and that they produce "robust" antibody response in children ages 12-15. NPR's Joe Palca has more.

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2021-03-31
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Inside The Opening Days Of The Derek Chauvin Trial ? And The Trauma It's Resurfacing

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin's trial began this week. He's accused of murdering Minneapolis resident George Floyd in May of 2020, when Chauvin was recorded kneeling on Floyd's neck for nearly 10 minutes.

NPR's Adrian Florido has been covering the trial and reports from Minneapolis.

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2021-03-30
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4 Countries Dominate Doses As Pressure Grows For Global Vaccine Solutions

More than half of worldwide vaccine doses have been administered in just four countries ? India, China, the U.K. and the U.S. That kind of inequity will "extend the pandemic, globally," says Tom Bollyky, director of the Global Health program at the Council on Foreign Relations.

NPR's Tamara Keith reports on the growing pressure for the Biden administration to step up its vaccine diplomacy.

NPR's Lauren Frayer tours the largest vaccine factory in the world's top vaccine producing-country, India ? a country poised for an even bigger role in global vaccine distribution. You can see photos and more from her report on the Serum Institute of India here.

Additional reporting in this episode from NPR's Jason Beaubien.

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2021-03-29
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First-In-The-Nation Effort Advances Debate Over What Form Reparations Should Take

The city of Evanston, Ill., authorized spending on a reparation program this week ? believed to be the first of its kind in the country. Here's the report on Evanston's racial history we mention in this episode.

Alderwoman Cecily Fleming ? an African American resident of Evanston ? tells NPR why she voted against the plan.

And Dreisen Heath, researcher at the Human Rights Watch, argues that reparations can take many forms.

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2021-03-26
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One's Antifa. One's In A Militia. How An Ancestry Match Led To An Unlikely Bond

Two distant cousins connect online, only to learn that one is a militant leftist and the other is in a right-wing militia. Their story shows the complexities of a timely question: Who's an extremist?

NPR's Hannah Allam followed both men for weeks, charting the growth of their relationship and revealing the moment they met in-person for the first time. NPR is withholding their last name, which the two men share, for security reasons.

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2021-03-25
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Colorado Shooting Reveals Limits Of State Gun Control ? And Steels Activists For More

Colorado has universal background checks, a red flag law and the city of Boulder recently passed an assault weapons ban. None of it was enough to stop a man from shooting and killing 10 people at a Boulder grocery store this week.

State Rep. Tom Sullivan, whose son was killed in the 2012 Aurora movie theatre shooting, reacts to the events of this week ? and tells NPR why he still believes incremental action at the state level can help prevent gun violence.

Additional editing help in this episode from Bente Birkeland of Colorado Public Radio.

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2021-03-24
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President Biden's Next Big-Ticket Item: A Transformational Infrastructure Plan

America's infrastructure GPA is a C-minus, according to the American Society Of Civil Engineers, which this month called for massive investment in the nation's roads, bridges and transit system.

The Biden administration is preparing to propose that kind of investment ? along with green energy policies and progressive programs that would total more than $3 trillion. NPR's Mara Liasson reports on the plan, which Biden has signaled he wants to pass with Republican support.

That's just one political balancing act Biden will have to negotiate. Another is with a key part of his political coalition: labor unions. NPR's Don Gonyea explains.

Additional reporting in this episode from NPR's David Schaper.

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2021-03-23
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Coronavirus Cases Are Surging In Europe. Why The U.S. Is In Better Shape ? For Now

In Europe, the COVID-19 vaccine rollout has been slow. The U.S. is doing better ? vaccinating as many as 3 million people per day this past weekend.

Some of those people were vaccinated by Chichi Ilonzo Momah, who runs Springfield Pharmacy in Springfield, Pa. Momah says local independent pharmacists are trying to make sure no one falls through the cracks.

The rollout is also progressing thanks in part to military personnel stationed at vaccine sites around the country that are run by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. WUSF's Stephanie Colombini visited one site in Tampa.

Additional reporting this episode from NPR's Allison Aubrey.

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2021-03-22
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BONUS: Sohla El-Waylly on Race, Food and 'Bon Appétit'

Sohla El-Waylly was one of the most vocal critics of her previous employer, Bon Appétit, and eventually resigned after the magazine's racial reckoning.She's now a columnist at Food52 and star of the YouTube series Off-Script with Sohla. She and Sam talk about racism in the food media industry (and everywhere else), The Cheesecake Factory, and certain kinds of mushrooms.
2021-03-21
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Are We Ready For The Next One? The Striking Pandemic Warnings That Were Ignored

Dante Disparte, founder and chairman of Risk Cooperative and member of FEMA's National Advisory Council, explains how lessons from last year can help us in the next pandemic ? and why warnings from former Presidents Bush and Obama were not enough to prepare the U.S. for the coronavirus.

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2021-03-19
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Georgia Shooting: The Latest In A Year Of Trauma And Terror For Asian Americans

Reports of hate incidents against Asian American and Pacific Islanders have skyrocketed in the past year, coinciding with former President Trump's racist rhetoric.

The pattern is clear: Asian American and Pacific Islander communities are being terrorized by harassment and violence. State representative Bee Nguyen tells NPR the shootings in Atlanta this week have rattled the Asian-American community in Georgia.

New York Congresswoman Grace Meng outlines a bill she's introduced to help address the issue.

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2021-03-18
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Pregnant In A Pandemic: 'COVID Couldn't Rob Us Of Everything'

Three women come together to talk about the isolation and sacrifice that comes with being pregnant during the pandemic.

Those women: Irène Mathieu, a pediatrician in Charlottesville, Virginia; Elizabeth Baron, a mental health counselor in New York City; and Ashley Falcon, a fashion stylist who moved from Florida to New York in the early stages of the pandemic.

Economist Hannes Schwandt predicts the pandemic will coincide with a drop in birth rates.

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2021-03-17
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What's Behind The Increase In Migrant Children At The Southern Border

Thousands of unaccompanied migrant children have shown up at the southern border in recent weeks, overwhelming the government's ability to process and transfer them into the custody of sponsors or family members.

Melissa Lopez, director of Diocesan Migrant & Refugee Services Inc, tells NPR what the situations looks like from her vantage point in El Paso.

Mark Greenberg, senior fellow at the Migration Policy Institute, explains why COVID-19 protocols are making it even harder for the government to handle the increase in migrants at the border.

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2021-03-16
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Young And Radicalized Online: A Familiar Pattern In Capitol Siege Suspects

People who stormed the Capitol were radicalized by what they consumed online and in social media. That should sound familiar: Ten years ago, ISIS used a similar strategy to lure Americans to Syria.

Dina Temple-Raston reports on the pattern of radicalization. Tom Dreisbach explores familiar warning signs in the past of one Capitol siege suspect ? including hateful speech and violent rhetoric.

More reporting from the NPR Investigations team is here.

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2021-03-15
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BONUS: Rapper Mac Phipps, After 20 Years In Prison, Is One Step Closer To Freedom

In this episode from NPR's Louder Than A Riot, New Orleans rapper Mac Phipps speaks exclusively to NPR about the power dynamics at play throughout his clemency hearing, and hosts Sidney Madden and Rodney Carmichael examine how his hip-hop career continues to affect his image in the eyes of the law.

Find more episodes of Louder Than A Riot on Apple Podcasts or Spotify.
2021-03-15
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Breonna Taylor Was Killed By Police 1 Year Ago. What's Changed Since Then?

It's been one year since Breonna Taylor was shot and killed by police in her own apartment. In that year, Taylor's name has become a national symbol in the fight against racial injustice and police violence. But beyond the symbolism, many feel that actual progress has been disappointing.

In Louisville, Taylor's death has made other young Black women reflect on their own safety. Reporter Jess Clark of member station WFPL spoke to Black high school students who say Taylor's death changed the way they look at police.

Amid the national protests against police brutality and systemic racism, Kentucky State Rep. Attica Scott marched with her daughter. A year later and Scott has introduced legislation in Taylor's name that would ban no-knock search warrants, among other things. Scott spoke with NPR about what change she has seen in the last year.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

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2021-03-12
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The Pandemic Is Still Global. Here's How Vaccination Is Going In Other Countries

Less than 4% of Brazil's population has been vaccinated, and now a dangerous new variant has overwhelmed parts of the country's health care system.

Duke University's Miguel Nicolelis tells NPR what it's like in Sao Paulo, where hospitals are turning patients away.

Other countries are also struggling to contain the coronavirus, combat disinformation, and distribute vaccines. NPR international correspondents survey the obstacles: Diaa Hadid in Islamabad, Ruth Sherlock in Beirut and Julie McCarthy, who covers the Philippines.

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2021-03-11
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The Day Everything Changed: Fauci, Collins Reflect On 1 Year Of The Pandemic

March 11 will mark one year since the World Health Organization officially declared the coronavirus outbreak a global pandemic ? when schools, businesses and workplaces began shutting down.

To mark the moment, two of the nation's top public health officials who have helped lead the U.S. response to the pandemic ? Dr. Anthony Fauci and Dr. Francis Collins ? spoke to NPR about what they've learned, what they regret and why they're hopeful about the year ahead. Hear their full interview with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly.

Collins is the Director of the National Institutes of Health and Fauci is the chief medical adviser to President Biden.

And NPR's Brianna Scott reports on how some Americans remember March 11.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

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2021-03-10
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George Floyd Case: Trial Of Former Police Officer Derek Chauvin Underway

Jury selection in the highly anticipated trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin began Tuesday after being delayed amid an effort to gain clarity on the potential of a third-degree murder charge. Chauvin faces charges in the killing of George Floyd last Memorial Day.

Jamiles Lartey, who reports on criminal justice and policing for The Marshall Project, explains the delay.

NPR's Leila Fadel and Adrian Florido have been covering the trial in Minneapolis.

Benjamin Crump, the attorney representing the family of George Floyd, argues that civil suits could deter police violence ? even if settlements aren't accompanied by a criminal conviction.

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2021-03-09
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COVID-19 Relief And Cash Payments Near; CDC Says Vaccinated Can Gather Without Masks

Over the weekend, the Senate approved a version of President Biden's $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan, setting up a vote in the House that could send the package to Biden's desk as early as Tuesday.

The package contains direct cash payments for many Americans, extended unemployment benefits, billions of dollars for vaccine distribution and a significant change to the child tax credit that could lift millions of American children out of poverty. Indi Dutta-Gupta of the Georgetown Center on Poverty and Inequality explains how the credit would work.

And there's new guidance for Americans who've been fully vaccinated. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say vaccinated people can feel safe enjoying a few pre-pandemic freedoms. NPR's Allison Aubrey has details. Here's more information on the new CDC recommendations.

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2021-03-08
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BONUS: 'It's OK That We're Alive'

What do you do after you've survived a mass shooting? In this episode of NPR's Embedded podcast, we hear the staff at the Capital Gazette newspaper return to work after losing five of their colleagues.

Trauma reveals itself in unexpected ways, coworkers struggle to figure out how they fit together as a team, and the staff grapples with the question: Is the newspaper that existed before the shooting the same one that exists after?
2021-03-07
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Colombia Welcomes Venezuelan Refugees With Open Arms: Will The U.S. Do The Same?

Colombian President Iván Duque won praise from the United Nations, Pope Francis and the Biden administration with his recent announcement that Colombia would welcome Venezuelan refugees with open arms ? providing protected status, work permits and legal residency for up to 10 years.

President Duque tells NPR why he's hopeful the move will spur the U.S. toward more aggressive support of Venezuelan migrants, some of whom are currently protected by a deferred deportation order signed by President Trump on his final day in office.

Reporter John Otis explains what Colombia's new policy means to Venezuelans already living there.

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2021-03-05
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Pandemic Inflection Point: Drop In Cases Stalls, States Loosen Public Health Measures

In the U.S., the rollout of COVID-19 vaccines is improving every day, but hundreds of millions of people are still vulnerable. And now, with some states relaxing or eliminating public health measures altogether, many people live in places where the virus will be freer to spread unchecked.

KUT reporter Ashley Lopez reports on how business owners and employees are reacting to the rollback of COVID-19 restrictions in Texas.

And Rochelle Walensky, the new director for the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, tells NPR this could be a turning point in the pandemic ? as more states face crucial decisions about whether to relax public health measures. Here's more from Walensky's interview with NPR's Ari Shapiro.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

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2021-03-04
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Stacey Abrams On The Continuing Fight For Voter Access

The Supreme Court heard arguments this week about voting laws in Arizona that would make ballot access harder for people living in rural areas like the Navajo Nation. NPR's Nina Totenberg reports that the conservative court isn't likely to strike down the laws which could pave the way for more legislation that cuts into future election turnout.

The push for legislation that would restrict voter access comes primarily from Republican lawmakers in state houses across the country. This is despite the fact that many GOP candidates benefited from record turnout last November.

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with voting activist Stacey Abrams about her role in turning Georgia blue during the last election and the challenges that new legislation may pose for the future.

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2021-03-03
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The Growing Threat Of Disinformation And How To 'Deprogram' People Who Believe It

Disinformation isn't new. But in the last decade, the growth of social media has made it easier than ever to spread. That coincided with the political rise of Donald Trump, who rose to power on a wave of disinformation and exited the White House in similar fashion.

NPR's Tovia Smith reports on the growing threat of disinformation ? and how expert deprogrammers work with people who believe it.

Other reporting on disinformation in this episode comes from NPR correspondents Joel Rose and Sarah McCammon.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

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2021-03-02
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Post-Trump, New U.S. Intel Chief Seeks To Rebuild Trust ? And Fight Domestic Terror

Director of National Intelligence Avril Haines has taken over after a turbulent time. Former President Donald Trump was frequently at odds with the American intelligence community, including some of his hand-picked intel chiefs.

In her first interview after a month on the job, Haines tells NPR's Mary Louise Kelly "it has been a challenging time" for the U.S. intel community.

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2021-03-01
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BONUS: The Man Behind the March on Washington

Bayard Rustin, the man behind the March on Washington, was one of the most consequential architects of the civil rights movement you may never have heard of. Rustin imagined how nonviolent civil resistance could be used to dismantle segregation in the United States. He organized around the idea for years and eventually introduced it to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. But his identity as a gay man made him a target, obscured his rightful status and made him feel forced to choose, again and again, which aspect of his identity was most important.

Listen to more episodes of NPR's Throughline on Apple Podcasts, NPR One or Spotify.
2021-02-28
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America's Next Generation Of Legal Marijuana: New State Laws Focus On Racial Equity

It's been almost a decade since Washington and Colorado became the first states in America to legalize recreational marijuana. Now a new generation of states are wrestling with how to do it with a focus on racial equity that was missing from early legalization efforts.

WBEZ reporter Mariah Woelfel reports from Chicago on why legalization plans in Illinois are still leaving Black businesses behind.

VPM reporters Ben Paviour and Whittney Evans explain how lawmakers in Virginia are designing new marijuana legislation with equity in mind.

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2021-02-26
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The Challenge To Stop The Next Outbreak Of Homegrown, Extremist Violence In The U.S.

Just because the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump is done, it doesn't mean the story of what happened on Jan. 6 at the U.S. Capitol is over.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi wants to set up a commission, similar to the one created after the Sept. 11 attacks, to investigate what happened that day and what measures might prevent a future attack. That's not so easy in this moment, when Congress is often gridlocked over the most basic things. And when lawmakers themselves are also witnesses to the attack ? and make partisan arguments about what motivated the Trump extremists who were involved.

NPR national security correspondent Hannah Allam was at the Capitol the day it was attacked. She shares how her beat and coverage of domestic extremism has changed over the years, from when she was a teenager living in Oklahoma City during the 1995 bombing to present day. You can follow more of her work here.

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2021-02-25
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America's Energy Future: How Gas Companies Are Fighting To Block Climate Rules

Natural gas utilities face a bleak future in a world increasingly concerned about climate change. An NPR investigation shows how they work to block local climate action and protect their business.

More from NPR's Jeff Brady and Dan Charles: As Cities Grapple With Climate Change, Gas Utilities Fight To Stay In Business. Additional reporting in this episode from NPR's Nathan Rott.

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2021-02-24
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Optimism About Case Rates, Vaccines, And Future Of The Pandemic

After more than 500,000 deaths and nearly a full year, experts say there are a growing number of reasons to be optimistic about the direction of the pandemic. Cases, hospitalizations and deaths have all fallen dramatically in recent weeks.

Among those falling numbers, a vaccine from Johnson & Johnson that may be authorized by the Food and Drug Administration this week. Dr. Ashish Jha of Brown University explains why the shot is just as desirable as already-authorized vaccines from Pzifer and Moderna.

Here's NPR's tool for how to sign up for a COVID-19 vaccination in your state.

The Biden administration has promised to ramp up vaccination efforts even more as soon as Congress authorizes more money to do so. NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell has an update on the $1.9 trillion rescue package speeding through the House.

Additional reporting on the drop in COVID-19 case rates in this episode came from NPR's Allison Aubrey and Will Stone.

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2021-02-23
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Update On A Movement: How 'Defunding Police' Is Playing Out In Austin, Texas

Last summer, the city of Austin, Texas, slashed the budget for its police department. More recently, the city council voted on a new way to spend some of that money. KUT reporter Audrey McGlinchy explains what other changes have taken place in Austin.

A powerful new player is joining calls for reparations for Black Americans: the American Civil Liberties Union. Civil rights attorney Deborah Archer ? the ACLU's newly elected board president and the first Black person to assume that role ? explains the organization's new stance.

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2021-02-22
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BONUS: Why 500,000 COVID-19 Deaths May Not Feel Any Different

Why is it so hard to feel the difference between 400,000 and 500,000 COVID-19 deaths ? and how might that impact our decision making during the pandemic?

In this bonus episode from NPR's daily science podcast Short Wave, psychologist Paul Slovic explains the concept of psychic numbing and how humans can often use emotion, rather than statistics to make decisions about risk.

To hear more about new discoveries, everyday mysteries, and the science behind the headlines, listen to Short Wave via Apple or Spotify.
2021-02-21
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Memorializing The Deaths Of More Than 500,000 Americans Lost To COVID-19

The U.S. death toll from COVID-19 is on track to pass a number next week that once seemed unthinkable: Half a million people in this country dead from the coronavirus.

And while the pandemic isn't over yet, and the death toll keeps climbing, artists in every medium have already been thinking about how our country will pay tribute to those we lost.

Poets, muralists, and architects all have visions of what a COVID-19 memorial could be. Many of these ideas are about more than just honoring those we've lost to the pandemic. Artists are also thinking about the conditions in society that brought us here.

Tracy K. Smith, a former U.S. poet laureate, has already written one poem honoring transit workers in New York who died of the disease. Smith says she wants to see a COVID-19 memorial that has a broader mission, that it needs to invite people in to bridge a divide.

Paul Farber runs Monument Lab, an organization that works with cities and states that want to build new monuments. He says he wants to see a COVID-19 monument that is collective experience and evolves over time. He also wants it to serve as a bridge to understanding.

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2021-02-19
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Texas Is Defined By Energy. How Did The State's Power Grid Fail So Massively?

Millions of people in Texas have gone three or more days without power, water or both. Texas has had winter weather before, so what went so wrong this time?

Reporter Mose Buchele of NPR member station KUT in Austin explains why the state's power grid buckled under demand in the storm. And Marshall Shepherd, director of the Atmospheric Sciences Program at the University of Georgia, explains the link between more extreme winter weather and climate change.

Additional reporting in this episode from NPR's Camila Domonoske, who reported on the Texas power grid, Ashley Lopez of KUT, Laura Isensee of Houston Public Media, and Dominic Anthony Walsh of Texas Public Radio.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

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2021-02-18
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Impeachment Fallout At Home And Abroad: GOP Fractured, America 'Tarnished'

After the Senate vote failed to convict former President Donald Trump, a clearer picture of the political consequences is emerging ? both for the Republican party and for the United States on the world stage.

NPR's Don Gonyea reports on Republican infighting the national, state and local level.

Secretary of State Antony Blinken tells NPR that the events of Jan. 6 have came up in conversations he's had with diplomatic counterparts around the world. Read more of Blinken's wide-ranging interview with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly here.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

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2021-02-17
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The Intensifying Race Between Coronavirus Variants And Vaccines

There's evidence of at least seven U.S. variants of the coronavirus, while another that emerged from the U.K. is poised to become the dominant strain here by the end of March. One adviser from the Food and Drug Administration tells NPR there's a tipping point to watch for: when a fully vaccinated person winds up hospitalized with a coronavirus variant.

NPR science correspondent Richard Harris reports on concerns that COVID-19 vaccines themselves could cause the virus to mutate.

NPR science reporter Michaeleen Doucleff explains why the story of one COVID-19 patient may hold clues to how variants develop in the first place. For a deeper dive on variants, listen to Michaeleen's recent episode of NPR's Short Wave on Spotify or Apple Podcasts.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at [email protected].
2021-02-16
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Asylum-Seekers Are Being Unlawfully Shut Out During The Pandemic

The United Nations refugee agency, UNHCR, says more than 60 countries around the world are using COVID-19 as an excuse to skirt international law by closing borders and ports to asylum-seekers. That has contributed to an increase in delayed rescues and unlawful expulsions of refugees to dangerous places.

NPR's Joanna Kakissis tells the story of one teenage survivor.

And NPR's Ruth Sherlock reports on a doomed journey of Lebanese refugees attempting to cross the Mediterranean sea ? where over 1,000 migrants died in 2020.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

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2021-02-15
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Q & A: Expert Advice On Love, Dating, And Pandemic Relationships

We asked for your questions on navigating love and dating during the pandemic. Therapist and sexologist Lexx Brown-James has answers. She's joined by Sam Sanders, host of NPR's news and pop culture show, It's Been A Minute. Listen via Apple or Spotify.

And University of Georgia social scientist Dr. Richard Slatcher shares some findings from his global research project, Love In The Time Of COVID.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at [email protected].
2021-02-12
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Scenes From A Pandemic Economy: 4 American Indicators

The pandemic economy has left different people in vastly different situations. Today, we introduce four American indicators ? people whose paths will help us understand the arc of the recovery. Hear their stories now, and we'll follow up with them in a few months:

Brooke Neubauer in Nevada, founder of The Just One Project; Lisa Winton of the Winton Machine Company in Georgia; Lee Camp with Arch City Defenders in Missouri; and New Jersey-based hotel owner Bhavish Patel.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at [email protected].
2021-02-11
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Public School Teachers Weigh In On Vaccines, Masks And Returning To The Classroom

The Biden administration has set a goal: a majority of public schools open "at least one day a week" by the 100th day of his presidency. But it's possible the country is already there ? and decisions about when to reopen largely fall to cities and school districts, where administrators and teachers sometimes don't see eye-to-eye.

Students are losing a lot of academic ground the longer their schooling is disrupted. Maine Public Radio's Robbie Feinberg reports on how one rural district is trying to reach students who haven't been showing up for online classes.

This week, as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is expected to release new guidelines about how schools can reopen safely, three public school teachers weigh in: Mike Reinholdt of Davenport, Iowa; Maxie Hollingsworth of Houston, Texas; and Pam Gaddy of Baltimore, Md.

For more education coverage, follow NPR's Anya Kamentez on Twitter, and check out her recent story "Keep Schools Open All Summer, And Other Bold Ideas To Help Kids Catch Up."

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at [email protected].
2021-02-10
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What Donald Trump's Impeachment Means The 2nd Time Around

In the weeks after Jan. 6. insurrection, even top Republicans like Mitch McConnell said Donald Trump provoked the mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol, leaving five people dead.

But it appears unlikely enough Republican Senators will find that he bears enough responsibility to warrant conviction in his second impeachment trial ? which could prevent him from ever holding office again.

Charlie Sykes, founder and editor at large of the conservative site The Bulwark, argues that Republicans are failing to hold themselves accountable.

NPR's Melissa Block reports on the future of Trump's "big lie" about the results of the 2020 election.

For more impeachment coverage, listen to the NPR Politics Podcast via Apple or Spotify.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at [email protected].
2021-02-09
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