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Post Reports

Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you?ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post. For your ears. Martine Powers is your host, asking the questions you didn?t know you wanted answered. Published weekdays by 5 p.m. Eastern time.

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Episodes

The 46th president

An inauguration like no other. And how the White House residence staff say goodbye to one first family and hello to another. 
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Joe Biden has been inaugurated as the 46th president of the United States, calling for unity in a speech to a divided nation. White House reporter Sean Sullivan reports. 
Kamala D. Harris is the first woman, and the first woman of color, to become vice president. Producer Jordan-Marie Smith talks to Harris's Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority sisters about how they?re celebrating.
Moving presidents? families into and out of the White House is a complicated process, expertly coordinated by the chief usher of the residence. Graphics reporter Bonnie Berkowitz describes the delicate dance, usually completed in under five hours. 
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2021-01-20
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Biden?s first days

Why the nation?s capital feels like a ghost town. What President-elect Joe Biden wants to get done on his first day in office. And why the Secret Service has been paying $3,000 a month for a bathroom. 
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President-elect Joe Biden has long been eager to undo and reshape policies advanced by the Trump administration over the past four years. Come Wednesday, he?ll make liberal use of his executive powers to do it, Matt Viser reports.
Peter Jamison was reporting on Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner?s potential departure from D.C., and he discovered a bizarre detail: The federal government used $3,000 a month of taxpayer dollars to pay for a bathroom for their Secret Service detail to use. The Trump-Kushner family has half a dozen bathrooms in their household, but according to neighbors and law enforcement officials, the people charged with keeping the family safe were instructed not to use any of them.
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2021-01-19
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Tulsa, 100 years later

The plight of black entrepreneurs in Tulsa, nearly a century after one of the nation?s worst acts of racial violence. 
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In 1921, a White mob descended on the Greenwood district of Tulsa, killing scores of African Americans, and looting and burning their businesses to the ground. The Tulsa massacre decimated Greenwood, a commercial hub once hailed as the height of Black enterprise. 
But as Tracy Jan reports, Black erasure in Tulsa is hardly a remnant of the past. Today, Black entrepreneurs in historic Greenwood feel threatened yet again, as gentrification drives up property values and Black business owners get priced out of land ownership ? and some of them are asking why there still hasn?t been restitution for the past. 
In case you missed it: On Friday?s episode of Post Reports, we went in deep on the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. With firsthand accounts from Post journalists, members of Congress and police, we reconstructed the events of that day, and answered some big questions about how it happened, why it happened and what might happen in the future. If you haven?t heard it yet, definitely go back to take a listen. That episode from Friday is called ?Four hours of insurrection.?
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2021-01-18
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Four hours of insurrection

Today, we reconstruct the riot inside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 ? hearing from the lawmakers, journalists and law enforcement officials who were there, and answering lingering questions about how things went so wrong. 
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The four-hour insurrection: How a mob of Trump supporters tried to disrupt American democracy. 
Reporters Rebecca Tan, Marissa J. Lang, Rhonda Colvin, and photojournalist Bill O?Leary were all witnesses to the violence on Jan. 6. They share their harrowing accounts of what it was like, inside and outside of the Capitol.
Reporter Peter Hermann explains how battered D.C. police made a stand against the Capitol mob. 
And reporter Carol D. Leonnig chronicles the experience of outgoing Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund, who told her that House and Senate security officials hamstrung his efforts to call in the National Guard.
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2021-01-16
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A brief history of tear gas in America

Tear gas is a chemical weapon banned in war. So why do police departments still use it on civilians in the United States? Producer Linah Mohammad and reporter Devlin Barrett examine the history of tear gas and the ethical questions about its use.
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Over the summer, tear gas was deployed to disperse peaceful protesters outside of St. John?s Church near the White House before President Trump posed with a Bible in front of the church, raising questions about the use of the chemical agent by law enforcement. 
Listen to the audio documentary KUOW at 65: The Battle in Seattle here.
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2021-01-15
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Impeached, again

President Trump is impeached by the House ? again. And, inside a California hospital overwhelmed by the pandemic.  Read more:
On Wednesday, the House of Representatives voted to impeach President Trump for the second time, on the charge of incitement of insurrection. This time, some Republicans supported the move, like Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.). Reporter Mike DeBonis reports on what it was like to be there today.
And while we?ve all been transfixed by the attack on the Capitol and its fallout ? there's still a pandemic happening. On Tuesday, more than 4,200 Americans died of covid-19. Jon Gerberg is a video journalist for The Post. He got rare access to a hospital in California where a covid-19 surge has completely overwhelmed the health-care system. He talked about it with producer Linah Mohammad. 
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2021-01-13
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Who?s in charge of the GOP?

A widening rift in the Republican Party. What FBI officials knew about the siege of the Capitol, and when they knew it. And, why the February Vogue cover of Kamala Harris is causing a stir.
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Political reporter Michael Scherer explains how the Capitol riot is escalating a fight for the soul of the Republican Party, with pro-Trump conspiracy theorists on one side and the party establishment on the other. 
The Washington Post has learned that a day before rioters stormed Congress, an FBI report warned of ?war? at the Capitol. That information contradicts a senior official?s declaration that the bureau had no intelligence indicating anyone at last week?s rally planned to do harm. National security reporter Matt Zapotosky lays out what we know about why law enforcement didn?t do more with the information. 
The nation?s first female vice president-elect has been photographed for the cover of February?s Vogue magazine, and a vocal chorus on social media is displeased with the images. The Post?s senior critic-at-large, Robin Givhan, explains why. 
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2021-01-12
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The insurrection planned in plain sight

How tech companies are responding to the far-right extremism on their platforms. Why we should have seen the siege on the Capitol coming. And, a brief history of presidential pettiness.
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The planning for last week?s assault on the U.S. Capitol happened largely in plain view, with chatters in far-right forums explicitly discussing how to storm the building, handcuff lawmakers with zip ties, and disrupt the certification of Joe Biden?s election. Those planners, however, are starting to lose their platforms, says reporter Drew Harwell. 
The scale of the siege was foreshadowed heavily on far-right social media websites, says researcher RazzanNakhlawi. And the groups who organized it ? they?ve been around for years, and they?re not going anywhere
President Trump says he will not attend President-elect Joe Biden?s inauguration. Writer Ronald G. Shafer explains that while this is uncommon in recent history, he?s not the first president to do so.
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2021-01-11
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Trump?s ?American Carnage?

Trump?s promise for a smooth transition of power might be too late, amid growing calls to remove him from office. After the attack on the Capitol, lawmakers seemed to come together ? but will that last with a 50-50 Senate? And an update from Georgia.
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White House bureau chief Phil Rucker brings us behind the scenes of a week when President Trump incited a mob of his supporters to attack the Capitol, and then, grudgingly, admitted his loss. 
With Democratic victories in Georgia?s runoff elections, the Senate will be equally split, with Vice President-Elect Kamala Harris serving as a tie-breaking vote. David Fahrenthold breaks down what that could look like
Last month, our host Martine Powers and producer Ted Muldoon reported from Georgia on the runoff elections, and all the people on the ground who were working to deliver a victory to the Democrats ? and the first Black senator from the state. One of those people was Bob Melvin, who we learned after the canvassing trip had contracted the coronavirus. We checked in with him this week after the Democrats? victory.
Correction: A previous version of this episode mistakenly said that Trump would be the second president to skip his successor?s Inauguration. In fact, there have been at least three others ? John Adams, John Quincy Adams, and Andrew Johnson.
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2021-01-08
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What happens after an insurrection?

The public fracturing of the Republican Party. Security failures at the Capitol. And, questions about why predominantly White rioters got kid-glove treatment from police.
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Lawmakers, rattled and angry, reconvened to certify election results after an angry pro-Trump mob stormed the U.S. Capitol. Seung Min Kim reports on the very public schism laid bare in the Republican Party. 
National security reporter Shane Harris on the massive failure of law enforcement to protect the building. 
Michael Brice-Saddler on the stark contrast between policing of predominantly White rioters at the Capitol and the Black Lives Matter protesters demonstrating last year. The comparison reveals a case of privilege, Brice-Saddler says. 
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2021-01-07
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Two Americas collide

The U.S. Capitol has been breached by a pro-Trump mob during the process of confirming Joe Biden?s vistory in the presidential election. Meanwhile, another election in Georgia is wrapping up ? with control of the Senate hanging in the balance. 
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A violent mob has breached the U.S. Capitol, halting a congressional count of electoral votes. Follow live updates here. 
Results from the Senate runoffs in Georgia signal a Democratic flip in the state, and in the Senate. National reporter Cleve Wootson reports from Atlanta
Eugene Scott, a reporter for The Fix, breaks down what we know about who voted in the Georgia runoffs, and how. 
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2021-01-07
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Can America?s vaccine rollout be fixed?

Why the vaccine rollout has been slower than expected in the United States. And, the political theater of counting electoral college votes. 
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Reporters Isaac Stanley-Becker and Brittany Shammas explain why state and local health systems are struggling to roll out coronavirus vaccines, and what that means for people hoping to sign up.
On Wednesday, Joe Biden will be one step closer to the presidency. Rosalind S. Helderman reports on what to expect during the congressional counting of electoral votes, and the futility of Republican lawmakers' objections
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2021-01-05
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?I just want to find 11,780 votes?

What President Trump?s pressure campaign to overturn his election defeat sounds like. And, a nursing home?s creative solution to physical isolation.
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Amy Gardner explains why Trump?s latest phone call to Georgia officials has legal scholars crying foul.
And as the nation keeps a close eye on Georgia?s two U.S. Senate runoff elections, it?s a good time to revisit Post Reports? deep dive into the real ? and perceived ? voter suppression in the state. 
And, after months of isolation, a ?hug room? in Italy lets nursing home residents touch their families for the first time, reports Chico Harlan.
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2021-01-04
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Georgia on our minds

As the dust settled after the November election, it became clear that the balance of power in Washington would all hinge on two Senate runoffs in Georgia. Whether President-elect Joe Biden will be able to accomplish major parts of his agenda, whether Congress will remain gridlocked, whether there will be single party rule or a still divided government -- it all comes down to Georgia. 
Attention, money and volunteers have poured into the state. But how much do we really understand about Georgia?s politics or history? Our host Martine Powers and producer Ted Muldoon bring us today?s dispatch from Georgia about these two runoff races, the history that led up to them and the ways that real and perceived voter suppression have collided in this one remarkable political moment.
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The Post?s political reporter Cleve Wootson has been reporting on the runoffs from Georgia for more than a month -- including looking at the massive amount of money and attention on the races. Records show Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock each raised more than $100 million in two months.
President Trump has been blasting Georgia?s election system. Many Republicans plan to vote in the Senate runoffs anyway.
In Georgia Senate runoffs, the focus ? and the fire ? is on Raphael Warnock.
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2020-12-30
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Love, actually ? isn?t all around

A story of love and family ? and deadlines. 
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For Post Reports producer Linah Mohammad, moving back in with her parents to weather the pandemic in Texas seemed like a harmless idea. 
But then Mohammad, who is single, turned 25 ? a milestone sometimes deemed ?the cutoff age for eligibility? for Arab women to marry ? and suddenly her parents? involvement in her love life made things a lot more complicated.
So she decided to do something she?d never done before: let her parents arrange a date.
Mohammad?s piece originally aired on the ?This American Life? episode ?Twenty-five.? 
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2020-12-29
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Underwater during a pandemic

In April, a massive dam failure in Midland, Mich., left an entire community underwater amid the pandemic. Jacob May saw the flood ravage his hometown and recorded an audio diary. This is Jacob?s story, and an update on how he?s doing now.
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Back in the spring, the producers of the Post podcast ?All Told? put together a series of audio diaries, bringing listeners inside different people?s experiences of the pandemic. One of those diaries was from Jacob May. In late April, a dam in Midland, Mich., failed massively. It left an entire community literally underwater. At the time, Jacob was a high school senior. He saw the devastation ravage his hometown. Today, we?re re-airing Jacob?s audio diary, and a follow-up interview to see how he?s doing now.
Previous audio diary episodes.
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2020-12-28
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?Presidential?: The story of Joe Biden

We really thought we knew everything there is to know about Joe Biden. ? But then we heard this episode of ?Presidential? with Lillian Cunningham and the New Yorker?s Evan Osnos, and we learned so much that we wanted to share it with you here. 
We?re taking a couple days off for Christmas. We hope you are safe and cozy wherever you are, whether you celebrate or not. We?ll be back on Monday, Dec. 28, with more stories from The Washington Post.
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Find the ?Presidential? podcast here, or wherever you get your podcasts. 
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2020-12-23
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London on lockdown

A new mutation of the coronavirus is spreading in the U.K. ? and causing chaos at certain ports of entry as Britain prepares to leave the European Union. Plus, the historic nomination of Rep. Deb Haaland to be interior secretary.
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The U.K. coronavirus mutation prompts more travel bans and major freight disruptions. The timing couldn?t be worse, London bureau chief Bill Booth says, as Britain prepares to leave the European Union. 
President-elect Joe Biden has picked Rep. Deb Haaland of New Mexico as his nominee for interior secretary. If confirmed, she?ll be the first Native American to serve in the position, managing the department that oversees the country?s tribal lands and has historically slighted Indigenous peoples in the United States. Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer
2020-12-22
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Is $900 billion too little too late?

What?s in the new stimulus package? The people stealing to survive during a pandemic. And a dispatch from America?s oldest Chinatown. 
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Rachel Siegel explains what Congress included in the long-awaited stimulus deal ? and what it left out
More people are shoplifting food during the pandemic, according to retailers, police departments and researchers around the country. Abha Bhattarai reports on the Americans struggling to survive covid-19?s harsh economic realities.  
Jada Chin details the pandemic plight of small businesses in a neighborhood that has remained a shining beacon for immigrants: San Francisco?s historic Chinatown. 
Check out our NABJ award-winning episodes! We were honored with the National Association of Black Journalists? Salute to Excellence for two episodes of Post Reports: one on finding joy in Black motherhood and another on Vice President-elect Kamala Harris?s time at Howard.
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2020-12-21
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The sensibility of Janet Yellen

How president-elect Joe Biden has tapped Janet Yellen to be the first female treasury secretary. And the mall Santas making it work. 
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Economist Janet L. Yellen has had many jobs, even in the White House. Now, she?s going to be the secretary of the Treasury Department ? if confirmed ? in Biden?s Cabinet. Economics correspondent Heather Long explains the significance of her nomination.
And, this year, Santa performers are braving the pandemic with plexiglass, sanitation elves and snow globe bubbles.
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2020-12-18
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From Russia, with malware

What Russia hacked this time. Why America?s biggest companies are laying people off during a pandemic ? while boasting record profits. And new coronavirus tests you can take at home.
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The U.S. government spent billions on a system for detecting hacks. The Russians outsmarted it, as national security reporter Ellen Nakashima explains. 
Some of America?s biggest companies have made a killing off the pandemic. But their record profits haven?t stopped them from laying off thousands of people, says corporate accountability reporter Doug MacMillan. 
How do home tests for coronavirus work? Health and science reporter William Wan explains.
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2020-12-17
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Get rich or vote trying

How members of Congress vote to enrich themselves. Why Biden is pursuing an unconventional pick for defense secretary. And what happened when The Post?s food critic got covid-19.
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Sens. Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue of Georgia aren?t alone in drawing scrutiny over their stock portfolios. Chris Ingraham dives into new research showing that lawmakers with stock holdings vote in ways that juice their portfolios.
Dan Lamothe explains the controversy surrounding President-elect Joe Biden?s choice to lead the Defense Department ? and why recently-retired military leaders are typically frowned upon for the job.
When food critic Tim Carman first fell ill with covid-19 earlier this year, he feared a loss of taste and smell. But, as Carman writes, it turned out to be much worse.
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2020-12-16
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The vaccine is here. She got it first.

Meet Sandra Lindsay, the first person to get a coronavirus vaccine in the United States. And a closer look at President-elect Joe Biden?s pick for secretary of state, Antony Blinken. 
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The vaccine is now being administered in the United States as hospitals struggle to keep up with coronavirus patients. Science reporter Ben Guarino on why this New York critical care nurse got the country?s first coronavirus shot: ?We were scared.?
Biden has picked Antony Blinken to be secretary of state. The nomination emphasizes experience and the foreign policy establishment, according to national security reporter John Hudson.
Late last week, the first coronavirus vaccine was approved for emergency use. But as we reported on Post Reports, the country will now embark on a finely orchestrated, high-stakes process to distribute and administer doses. Meet the people inside a supply chain that could end the pandemic.
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2020-12-15
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Immigration under Trump

Looking back at four years of Trump?s immigration policies. Plus, setting egg-spectations for Britain?s pubs under covid.
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In 2015, Donald Trump ran on the promise to overhaul immigration ? a vow he made good on as soon as he was sworn in. Immigration reporter Maria Sacchetti takes us through all the steps President Trump took to change the U.S. immigration system, from banning travel from some Muslim-majority countries to separating families, and the potentially lasting change in tone and rhetoric around immigration.
Adam Taylor explains the debate over coronavirus rules that is entangling Britain?s politics: Is a scotch egg a substantial meal?
Black country music star Charley Pride died Saturday at the age of 86. Listen to a past episode of Post Reports about the Black roots of country music.
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2020-12-14
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Policing mental health crises

What can go wrong when police are the ones responding to mental health crises. And grieving virtually during the pandemic.
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The final moments of Stacy Kenny?s life are captured on a recorded 911 call. 
Kenny, who had been diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, begs an emergency operator to explain why she?s been pulled over. 
The officers ? Springfield Sgt. Rick A. Lewis and Officer Kraig Akins ? smash the windows on her car. They Taser her twice, punch her in the face more than a dozen times and try to pull her out by her hair. She is unarmed and restrained by her locked seatbelt.
Her life ends ? as does the call ? when she tries to flee by driving away with one of the officers still inside the car. He shoots her in the head.
In 2019, her death in Springfield, Ore., was one of 1,324 fatal shootings by police over the past six years that involved someone police said was in the throes of a mental health crisis. 
Investigative reporter Kimberly Kindy breaks down why such fatal shootings of people in mental health crises are on the rise in small and mid-sized cities ? and what those left to live with loss, like Stacy?s parents, Barbara and Chris Kenny, hope police departments will change about how they respond to mental-health-related calls.

The pandemic has changed the way we process grief. Animator Kolin Pope and audio editor Ted Muldoon bring us a meditation on Zoom funerals
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2020-12-11
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A supply chain that could end the pandemic

When the first coronavirus vaccine is approved for emergency use, officials across the country will embark on a finely orchestrated, high-stakes process to distribute and administer doses. Meet the people inside the supply chain that could end the pandemic.
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Once you have a vaccine, you have to get it to the masses. That?s the hard part. A vaccine manufacturer. A shipper. A state health official. A dry-ice guy. Host Martine Powers and producer Linah Mohammad take us inside the supply chain and speak to the people responsible for making the life-saving vaccine program work. In this episode, we explore how each part of the chain is preparing ? from approval and manufacturing, to climate-controlled delivery reliant on dry ice, to how stores are readying themselves for the first shipment. 
Learn about the potential kinks that may show up in the chain and what it takes to overcome those hurdles. 
What you need to know about the coronavirus vaccine, and what to watch this week
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2020-12-10
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Bridging the vaccine?s trust gap

Can companies require employees to be vaccinated? What community leaders and health officials are doing to sell Black Americans on the coronavirus vaccine. And a second life for Halloween skeletons. 
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Can your employer require you to get vaccinated? Reporter Jena McGregor breaks it down.
Many Black Americans are not sold on the coronavirus vaccine, citing a long history of medical mistreatment and continuing inequities in modern-day health care as reasons not to trust the medical establishment. Lola Fadulu reports on the efforts to bring people around to the vaccine.
Don?t take down your Halloween decorations just yet. Arts and culture reporter Maura Judkis explains how giant skeletons are being repurposed for Christmas. 
What you need to know about the vaccines in development.
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2020-12-09
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Biden?s unorthodox health team

President-elect Joe Biden?s names his administration?s top health officials. The toll the pandemic has taken on nursing home employees. And an inauguration unlike any other. 
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Health reporter Amy Goldstein examines the president-elect?s picks for top health officials, including the unorthodox choice of California Attorney General Xavier Becerra for secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services
The pandemic has taken a heavy toll on nursing home workers. ?The problem is that there have been a number of nursing home employees who have either quit or fallen ill or died,? says business reporter Will Englund. ?And in a business that has a traditional or a chronic problem with short staffing, that's gotten even much worse.?National political reporter Matt Viser on what you need to know about Joe Biden?s inauguration. 
Today is the 40th anniversary of John Lennon?s death. Listen to a previous episode, where arts reporters Geoff Edgers revisits his last album.
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2020-12-08
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Lame-duck executions

Why the Justice Department is pushing executions before the inauguration. The secret centrist revolt that could mean a second stimulus. And, how a top official tasked with helping Americans through the pandemic could benefit from hundreds of evictions.
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Under the Trump administration, the Justice Department is pursuing several federal executions during a lame-duck period ahead of Joe Biden?s inauguration. Reporter Matt Zapotosky explains
Last week, a bipartisan group of lawmakers released a $908 billion relief proposal. But, as reporter Jeff Stein explains, not everyone is on board.
Hundreds of families living on property owned in part by senior White House adviser Jared Kushner are facing eviction during a pandemic. Jonathon O?Connell reports on how the management company associated with Kushner is filing to remove tenants who are behind on rent by Dec. 31. 
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2020-12-07
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America?s deadliest serial killer

Reporter Hannah Knowles reveals a portrait of a fragmented and indifferent criminal justice system that for decades allowed the country?s deadliest serial killer to target those on the margins of society.
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America?s deadliest serial killer went undetected for decades. Between 1970 and 2005, he claims to have killed at least 93 people ? nearly all women, many who remain unidentified.
For months, a team of reporters at The Post has been investigating Samuel Little?s killings ?of people who lived on the margins of society, whose murders police failed to connect and solve
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2020-12-04
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The battle between fear and boredom in El Paso

Pandemic fatigue permeates even the cities hit hardest by the virus: In El Paso the death toll is staggering, but the community is struggling to come together to fight it. Plus, how a group advising the CDC is deciding who should get vaccines first. 
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El Paso was still grieving when the coronavirus arrived. Now, death has overwhelmed it. Arelis Hernández says the city pulled together after 23 people were killed in an attack at a Walmart last year, but El Paso is now struggling to summon solidarity as scores die of covid-19.
How do you decide who gets a vaccine first? Health reporter Lena H. Sun explains the complicated factors the committee advising the CDC is weighing ? including how to save the most lives, how to stop the spread of the coronavirus and how to make people confident enough in the vaccine to take it in the first place.
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2020-12-03
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How to raise $170 million after an election

How President Trump might use the $170 million he?s raised to challenge election results. Infighting muddies the future of the Democratic Party. And, how the pandemic has complicated shared custody agreements.
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November was one of the president?s most successful fundraising months. Michelle Ye Hee Lee explains how Trump raised more than $170 million using appeals about false election claims, and where that money could go.
Democrats expected a blue wave this election cycle. It didn?t happen. Now, two factions within the party are openly battling over why. Political reporter Sean Sullivan brings us inside the feud, and the scramble over the future of the Democratic Party.
As we?ve discussed on the show, parenting during a pandemic is really difficult. Reporter Nia Decaille shares the experiences of divorced and separated couples, for whom the pandemic has complicated joint custody agreements.
2020-12-02
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Why was Iran?s top nuclear scientist killed?

The debate is not whether Israel killed Iran?s top nuclear scientist, but why. How the ?Q? conspiracy theory went from an American curiosity to a transnational mess. And, the people who have covid-19 symptoms for the long haul.
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In the hours after the brazen assassination of Iran?s top nuclear scientist, the question quickly shifted from ?who? to ?why.? Jerusalem bureau chief Steve Hendrix explains why Israel might have been motivated to strike now. 
Reporter Emily Rauhala explains the global appeal and dangerous adaptability of QAnon?s conspiracy theories. 
Kelsey Ables is a reporter and editorial aide with The Post. She has delved into the life of covid-19 long-haulers: people who have symptoms and effects from the virus well after two weeks. She spoke with one woman, Chimére Smith, about what she?s facing.
2020-12-01
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Biden?s play-it-safe, history-making Cabinet

What Joe Biden?s nominees and appointments can tell us about the incoming president?s administration. And, the former head of the CDC on what it will take to get coronavirus vaccines to the masses.
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National political reporter Annie Linskey on President-elect Joe Biden?s Cabinet picks ? including economist Janet Yellen as the first female treasury secretary and an all-female communications team.
Moderna is moving closer to getting the green light for its coronavirus vaccine. But as former CDC director Tom Frieden says, ?It?s not vaccines that save lives ? it?s vaccination programs.?
2020-11-30
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The emotional toll of distance learning

Education reporter Laura Meckler explores the impact of distance learning on young kids? emotional health and behavior ? and what families and caretakers can do to help make a difficult situation better. 
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In March, school campuses across the United States began to shutter, forcing a nation of students home to pivot ? seemingly overnight ? to online learning. But left in the lurch are children, especially young children. 
After many districts decided to stay online during the fall semester, The Washington Post asked listeners and readers to send a recording of what it?s been like to continue school from home. ?We heard back from a lot of kids, and what we heard was sort of a few themes over and over again,? says education reporter Laura Meckler. 
On today?s show, Meckler explores the enormous behavioral, physical and emotional toll that online learning has had so far. She speaks with 2020 teacher of the year Tabatha Rosproy and child psychiatrist Matthew Biel about what parents can do to get them, and their children, through Zoom school. 
Alexis Diao produced this episode, and reporter Hannah Natanson contributed reporting. You can read some of those submissions and view artwork by children about distance learning here.
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2020-11-25
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Working moms are not okay

Juggling careers and kids was already a struggle for millions of women in America. Then the pandemic hit. Ellen McCarthy reports on why working moms are leaving the labor force in droves ? and what that could mean for the future of our country.
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When they met as students in Chicago, Vondetta Taylor and Jennifer Anderson were all aspiration. Taylor was training to be a chef. Anderson was working toward a career in broadcasting. And they both dreamed of starting their own families one day.
Careers and kids didn?t seem like too much to hope for or too much to handle back then. Growing up in the 1980s and ?90s, Taylor and Anderson were part of a generation of young women raised with the expectation that they could have it all, and that they should have it all.
But when the pandemic hit and their kids were sent home from school, their circumstances soured. And as Ellen McCarthy and Amy Joyce reported, the two friends became part of a legion of women who had no choice but to leave the labor force
?I had made a decision that I was no longer going to beat myself up about what type of interaction that I needed to have with my son, which would cause whatever type of performance for my job,? Taylor said. ?I chose my son over my job.?
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2020-11-24
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The invisible public health crisis

Health reporter William Wan examines one of the unseen effects of the pandemic on people?s lives ? the emotional and psychological toll of all that?s happened.
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Almost a year into a pandemic, we?re all aware of what the coronavirus can do to our bodies. More than 250,000 Americans have died. Millions of people around the world are sick.
But there are other, non-physical effects, too ? the emotional and psychological toll of isolation, constant fear and loss, especially on young adults. That?s what Ted Robbins wants you to understand:
?What they told me was: ?You as a parent don?t realize how bad it is for the youth today. You don?t realize how many of Christian?s friends have contemplated suicide. You don?t realize how depressed we are. You don?t realize how hard this is.? ?
Months after the loss of his son to suicide, Robbins spoke with health reporter William Wan and producer Rennie Svirnovskiy about the conversations we?re still not having about mental health ? and about the changes we?ll need to make if we?re going to get through this pandemic.
?I can?t bring Christian back,? Robbins said. ?No matter how much I want to or I try, I can?t bring him back. But what I can do is try to save other children.?
If you or someone you know needs help, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-TALK, or 800-273-8255. You can also text a crisis counselor by messaging the Crisis Text Line at 741741.
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2020-11-23
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The campaign to flip the election

Will anyone stop the president?s attempts to overturn the election? Revisiting the iconic album documenting John Lennon?s last years. And, where tourists go for fake coronavirus test results.
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With most legal options exhausted, President Trump is now using the power of his office to overturn the election by claiming baseless allegations of voter fraud. White House bureau chief Philip Rucker reports on the president?s attempt to stay in office.
National arts reporter Geoff Edgers revisits John Lennon?s last album on the 40th anniversary of its release.
Fake coronavirus test results are hitting the black market. Shannon McMahon discusses the tourists paying top dollar for them. 
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2020-11-20
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Inauguration is 62 days away. What could go wrong?

The votes have been (mostly) counted, and though Joe Biden is clearly the president-elect, there are still more steps and potential obstacles for that to become official. Plus, why more men are dying of covid-19. Read more:
This week in Wayne County in Michigan, a drama has been unfolding over a procedural step that happens in every election: the certification of the vote. Trevor Potter of the Campaign Legal Center explains the process for Joe Biden to officially become the president -- and what could still go wrong between now and Jan. 20.
Ben Guarino is a reporter covering the practice and culture of science for The Post. He joins the show to talk about how more men are dying from the coronavirus compared with women ? a global problem that?s now prevalent in the United States.
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2020-11-19
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How we voted, and why

A look at how key groups voted in this election: from Latinos in Texas and the women who went for President Trump to the Black voters who pushed President-elect Joe Biden across the finish line. 
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Democrats lost ground with swing Latino voters in key states such as Florida and Texas. In the Rio Grande Valley, national reporter Arelis Hernandez says, the surprising support for Trump underscores the need for Democrats to cultivate deeper relationships with a diverse Latino population.
White women were expected to vote overwhelmingly for Biden. That did not happen. Gender reporter Samantha Schmidt explains how party, not gender, is a stronger force in presidential politics today. 
National reporter Vanessa Williams on how Black voters saved Joe Biden?s campaign, again
Read The Post?s exit poll analysis here
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2020-11-18
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A red wave of Republicans ? and covid cases

How Republicans are using election wins to justify their approach to the pandemic. The CDC?s latest on why you should wear a mask. And, the coronavirus response in Africa. 
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GOP leaders flouted warnings from public health officials early on. National political reporter Griff Witte explains how Republicans are now pointing to election wins to justify their approach to the pandemic. 
Coronavirus cases are reaching record highs in the United States. ?Every two seconds we get another case. Every minute we get another death,? says health reporter Lena Sun. Sun explains the latest science from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on masks, and why they work. 
African countries have been largely successful in their response to the pandemic. Global Opinions editor Karen Attiah shares why that shouldn?t be surprising. 
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2020-11-17
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The lame-duck economy

With protections expiring and no stimulus deal in sight, Americans could be heading for even more economic pain. The national security costs of delaying the transition. And the promise of at-home coronavirus testing.
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Could we get another stimulus package during the lame-duck period? Jeff Stein reports on the political forces at work, and the potential costs of doing nothing
Experts are concerned that President Trump?s unwillingness to start a transition threatens the security of our country. Shane Harris explained the risks on The Post?s ?Can He Do That?? podcast.
Home tests could help in the fight against the coronavirus. So where are they? William Wan reports. 
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2020-11-16
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The worst covid surge is just beginning

The Midwest emerges as the latest hot spot for coronavirus, as daily cases across the U.S. breaks records. And the Democrats? last hope to take control of the Senate comes down to Georgia.
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Coronavirus cases continue to surge in the U.S. Reporters Annie Gowen and William Wan take a look at where the cases are rising and why.
Senior congressional correspondent and columnist Paul Kane joins the show to talk about the Democrats? last hope to take the Senate in Georgia.
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2020-11-13
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What?s wrong with polling?

Campaign strategists and the public were led to believe that Democrats were headed for a wave. Election results have told a different story, just as they did four years ago. And, the next steps for a promising coronavirus vaccine.
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Polls fell short again in 2020. Political reporter Michael Scherer discusses what that means for future elections.
Carolyn Y. Johnson explains the next steps for Pfizer?s coronavirus vaccine, which the company finds is 90 percent effective in early data from its vaccine trial.
Our colleague Lillian Cunningham?s podcast ?Presidential? has a new episode, all about Joe Biden: Triumph, tragedy and the fate of the center.
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2020-11-12
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Is this a coup?

The quiet pessimism lurking inside the White House. How Joe Biden plans to tackle an ?existential threat to humanity? ? climate change. And how to reclaim your sense of time during this ? time. Read more:
White House reporter Josh Dawsey on what?s going on behind the bold claims from the president and his allies that he will stay for four more years
President-elect Joe Biden stands poised to launch the boldest climate change plan of any president in American history. Climate reporter Juliet Eilperin combs through his plans and explains what could stand in his way.  
Constantly wondering what day it is? This newsletter can help you remember ? and recover.
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2020-11-11
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These tweets may be harmful to your democracy

Breaking down conspiracy theories over election fraud. The Republicans who won, even when Trump didn?t. And, a new leader in the box office. 
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Tech reporter Drew Harwell reports on the conspiracy theories taking hold among Trump supporters and being bolstered by Republican lawmakers
The battle for control of the Senate is still up in the air. But, as Fix reporter Amber Phillips explains, Republican politicians who embrace Trump won big this election. 
As the U.S. struggles to revive its economy during a pandemic, China takes the lead in movie box office sales. Foreign correspondent Eva Dou reports that it is the latest indication of China?s swift recovery
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2020-11-10
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New president, same pandemic

President-elect Joe Biden prepares a transition to the White House ? and readies a team to combat a surging pandemic. And for future leaders, the hope and promise of Kamala Harris.
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Joe Biden is projected to be the next president of the United States. But, as politics writer Matt Viser reports, the president-elect faces some Trump-sized roadblocks in his transition to the White House.
Days after winning the election, Biden put forth a plan to slow the coronavirus. Health policy reporter Yasmeen Abutaleb walks us through who is on the president-elect?s coronavirus task force and what we know about his strategy to tackle the pandemic.
Senior critic-at-large Robin Givhan talks about Kamala Harris making history with quiet, exquisite power.Follow The Post?s live updates on the election here
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2020-11-09
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How does a man who hates losing prepare to lose?

As key states flip for Joe Biden, the former vice president renews calls for patience. Meanwhile inside the White House, President Trump is by turns angry and despondent. But no matter what happens next, it?s clear: Trumpism is here to stay. 
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As Joe Biden overtakes President Trump in key states, national political reporter Matt Viser says the Democrat?s campaign is urging calm and patience as ballots continue to be counted. 
On Thursday night, President Trump delivered an angry, despondent speech in the face of a potential defeat. White House reporter Ashley Parker on what this week has been like for a president who hates to lose. 
Foreign affairs columnist Ishaan Tharoor on the legacy of Trumpism: ?Trumpism exists beyond Trump,? he says, ?because it wasn't always about Trump in the first place. He was a symptom of a whole series of conditions in American society and politics that led to this kind of nationalist movement.? 
Follow The Post?s live updates on the election here
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2020-11-06
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The divided states of America

Why the Trump campaign is mounting legal challenges in swing states. What the election reveals about the urban-rural divide. And why Wall Street likes the sound of gridlock in Washington. 
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Trump is mounting several legal battles over votes in key states. National political reporter Amy Gardner lays out the lawsuits to watch and what they could mean for the outcome of the election.
As battleground states continue to count ballots, one clear picture emerges: a divided America. White House reporter Bob Costa explains.
Economics correspondent Heather Long breaks down what political gridlock could mean for Wall Street and your wallet. 
Follow the Post?s live updates on the election here
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2020-11-05
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The race to 270

Battleground states continue counting ballots in races that are too close to call. And how Democrats failed to capture Latino voters in Florida.
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The presidential election is still too close to call. Aaron Blake lays out the states to watch in this quickly moving race, and explains each candidate?s potential path to victory. 
President Trump took a decisive and early win in Florida on election night. National enterprise reporter Jose Del Real explains how Trump successfully mobilized the Latino vote in South Florida ? a feat that shocked many Democrats. 
Follow the Post?s live updates on the election here
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2020-11-04
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