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The Daily

The Daily

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

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Episodes

The Story of Simone Biles

This episode contains mentions of sexual abuse.

Simone Biles, 24, showed up on the national stage at 16, when she competed in and won the national championships. She equally impressed at her first Olympics, in 2016 in Rio.

Going into the Tokyo Games this year, Ms. Biles ? who is considered one of the greatest gymnasts of all time ? was expected to win the all-around. So she shocked many this week when she pulled out of the competition.

What prompted her decision?

Guest: Juliet Macur, a sports reporter for The New York Times. 

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Background reading: 

Ms. Biles was widely embraced as the latest elite athlete who had the courage to acknowledge her vulnerability. In pulling out of the Olympics, she rejected a long tradition of stoicism in sports.By withdrawing from competition citing concerns over her mental health, Ms. Biles showed that resisting expectations could be more powerful than persisting through them.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-07-30
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Why Is China Expanding Its Nuclear Arsenal?

For decades, nuclear weapons did not figure prominently in China?s military planning. However, recent satellite images suggest that the country may be looking to quintuple its nuclear arsenal. 

Why is China changing strategy now?

Guest: David E. Sanger, a White House and national security correspondent for The New York Times. 

 

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Background reading: 

Is China scrapping its ?minimum deterrent? strategy and joining an arms race? Or is it merely looking to create a negotiating card?

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-07-29
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The Saga of Congress?s Jan. 6 Investigation

This episode contains strong language.

The first hearing of the special congressional committee on the Jan. 6 riots was an emotional affair, but it was not quite the investigation that was originally envisaged.

In January, lawmakers on both sides spoke of putting aside partisanship and organizing an investigation akin to the 9/11 commission, considered the gold standard of nonpartisan fact-finding.

Why did the commission fail and what is taking place instead?

Guest: Luke Broadwater, a congressional reporter for The New York Times. 

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Background reading: 

?A hit man sent them.? Police officers at the Capitol recounted the horrors of Jan. 6 on the first day of the House committee investigation into the event.In remarks before the hearing, Rep. Kevin McCarthy, the House minority leader, said Republicans wanted the focus of the inquiry to be on the lack of preparation for the violence and ways to prevent future attacks.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-07-28
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The Vaccine Mandate Conundrum

In the effort to raise America?s vaccination rate, some agencies and private organizations have turned to the last, and most controversial, weapon in the public health arsenal: vaccine mandates.

How have the federal government and the White House approached the issue?

Guest: Jennifer Steinhauer, a Washington reporter for The New York Times. 

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Background reading: 

California and New York City will require vaccinations or tests for their employees, while the Department of Veterans Affairs said frontline health care workers must get vaccinated or face possible termination.With some health care workers still refusing to be immunized, medical centers around the country are requiring shots as cases climb once again.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-07-27
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Breakthrough Infections, Explained

For the past couple of weeks, some Americans have reported a curious phenomenon: They have caught the coronavirus despite being vaccinated.

Vaccines are still doing their job by protecting against serious illness and hospitalization, but the frequency of so-called breakthrough infections has surprised experts.

How do such cases happen, and what risks do they pose?

Guest: Apoorva Mandavilli, a science and global health reporter for The New York Times. 

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Background reading: 

Breakthrough infections are still relatively uncommon, experts said, and those that cause serious illness, hospitalization or death even more so.While being fully inoculated protects against serious illness and hospitalization from Covid-19, no vaccine offers 100 percent protection, and vaccinated people may need to take a few more precautions. Here?s what you need to know.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-07-26
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The Sunday Read: ?The Little Hedge Fund Taking Down Big Oil?

An activist investment firm won a shocking victory at Exxon Mobil. But can new directors really put the oil giant on a cleaner path?

This story was written by Jessica Camille Aguirre and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2021-07-25
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Putting a Price on Pollution

Extreme weather across Europe, North America and Asia is highlighting a harsh reality of science and history: The world as a whole is neither prepared to slow down climate change nor live with it.

European officials are trying to change that. The European Commission, the E.U.?s executive arm, recently introduced ambitious legislation aimed at sharply cutting emissions to slow down climate change within the next decade, specifically by weaning one of the world?s biggest and most polluting economies off fossil fuels. But can it generate the political will to see it through?

Guest: Somini Sengupta, the international climate reporter for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

Our climate correspondent explains what you need to know about the implications of recent extreme weather events for rich countries.Want to learn more about the science behind climate change? Here are some answers to the big questions, like how we know we?re really in a climate crisis.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-07-23
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Who Killed Haiti?s President?

A promise of a well-paying assignment abroad for retired Colombian soldiers. A security company in Miami. An evangelical Haitian American pastor with lofty ideas. Trying to join the dots in the assassination of President Jovenel Moïse took us from the Caribbean to South America to Florida ? and there are still plenty of questions.

Guest: Julie Turkewitz, the Andes bureau chief for The New York Times, and Frances Robles, a national and foreign correspondent for The Times based in Florida.

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Background reading: 

Interviews with more than a dozen people suggest that the suspects had been working together for months ? but to what end is still mysterious.One suspect was said to have claimed he was ?sent by God? to help Haiti.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-07-22
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Reacting to Chinese Cyberattacks

The Chinese government?s hacking of Microsoft was bold and brazen.

The Biden administration tried to orchestrate a muscular and coordinated response with Western allies. But while the U.S. has responded to cyberattacks from Russia with economic sanctions, when it comes to Beijing, the approach is more complicated.

Why does the U.S. take a different course with China?

Guest: David E. Sanger, a White House and national security correspondent for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

The Biden administration organized a broad group of allies to condemn Beijing for cyberattacks around the world but stopped short of taking concrete punitive steps.Over the past decade, China has transformed into a sophisticated and mature cyber threat to the U.S.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-07-21
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Facebook vs. the White House

Is misinformation on Facebook an impediment to ending the pandemic?

President Biden even said that platforms like Facebook, by harboring skepticism about the shots, were killing people.

Facebook immediately rejected the criticism, but who is right?

Guest: Cecilia Kang, a correspondent covering technology and regulatory policy for The New York Times. 

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Background reading: 

Mr. Biden?s blunt statement about Facebook capped weeks of frustration in the White House over the spread of vaccine disinformation on social media.In response, Facebook called on the administration to stop ?finger-pointing.?

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-07-20
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Do We Need a Third Covid Shot?

The rise of the Delta variant has prompted a thorny question: Do we need a booster dose of the vaccine for Covid-19? Vaccine makers think so, but regulators are yet to be convinced.

Principles are also at stake: Should richer countries be talking about administering extra doses when so many people around the world are yet to receive even a single shot?

Guest: Rebecca Robbins, a business reporter covering Covid-19 vaccines for The New York Times. 

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Background reading: 

Although studies of a third dose are underway, experts agree that the vaccines are still working well. Here?s what to know about the potential booster dose.U.S. officials said that the decision to go ahead with a booster shot would depend partly on how many infections cause serious disease or hospitalization in vaccinated people.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-07-19
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The Sunday Read: ?The Mystery of the $113 Million Deli?

It made headlines around the world: a New Jersey sandwich shop with a soaring stock price. Was it just speculation, or something stranger?

This story was written by Jesse Barron and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2021-07-18
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State-Sponsored Abuse in Canada

This episode contains accounts of physical and sexual abuse.

The residential school system was devised by the Canadian government under the auspices of education, but very little education took place. Instead, children were taken from their families in order to wipe out Indigenous languages and culture.

In 1959, when Garry Gottfriedson was 5, he was sent to one such school: Kamloops Indian Residential School.

On today?s episode, we hear his story and explore how Indigenous activists have agitated for accountability and redress from the federal government.

Guest: Ian Austen, a correspondent covering Canada for The New York Times. 

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Background reading: 

Two gruesome discoveries of what Indigenous groups say are the remains of hundreds of children have strengthened the groups? resolve to hold Canada accountable for a long-hidden brutal history.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-07-16
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Cubans Take to the Streets

This episode contains strong language.

It was a surprise to many recently when protesters took to the streets in a small town near Havana to express their grievances with Cuba?s authoritarian government. Cubans do not protest in huge numbers.

Even more remarkable: The protests spread across the island.

Why are Cubans protesting, and what happens next?

Guest: Ernesto Londoño, the Brazil bureau chief for The New York Times, covering the southern cone of South America. 

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Background reading: 

Thousands of Cubans have taken to the streets in cities around their country to protest food and medicine shortages, in a remarkable eruption of discontent not seen in nearly 30 years.Security forces arrested dozens of protesters after a wave of demonstrations on Sunday. But dissidents expressed hope the protests would lead to lasting change.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-07-15
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The Heat Wave That Hit the Pacific Northwest

The heat wave that hit the usually cool and rainy American Pacific Northwest was a shock to many ? Oregon and Washington were covered by a blanket of heat in the triple digits.

After the temperatures soared, a group of scientists quickly came together to answer a crucial question: How much is climate change to blame?

Guest: Henry Fountain, a climate change reporter for The New York Times; and Sergio Olmos, a freelancer for The Times. 

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Background reading: 

An analysis of the recent record-breaking heat found that it would have been virtually impossible without the influence of human-caused climate change.The extreme temperatures in Oregon, Washington State and Canada were exacerbated by an intense drought. Here is what to know about these heat waves.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-07-14
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Will a Top Trump Deputy Flip?

In its investigation of the Trump Organization?s financial affairs, the Manhattan district attorney?s office has zeroed in on Allen Weisselberg, the company?s former finance chief, who spent almost half a century working for the Trump family. 

Criminal charges have been brought against Mr. Weisselberg in the hopes of getting him to cooperate in an investigation of former President Donald Trump. Will he flip?

Guest: Ben Protess, an investigative reporter for The New York Times; and Michael Rothfeld, an investigative reporter for The Times?s Metro Desk. 

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Background reading: 

The Trump Organization has been charged with running a 15-year scheme to help its executives evade taxes by compensating them with fringe benefits that were hidden from the authorities.In nearly half a century of service to Mr. Trump?s family businesses, Allen Weisselberg has survived ? and thrived ? by anticipating and carrying out his boss?s dictates in a zealous mission to protect the bottom line. His fealty has now landed him in serious legal jeopardy

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-07-13
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A City?s Step Toward Reparations

For decades, the granting of racial reparations in the United States appeared to be a political nonstarter. But Evanston, Ill., recently became the first city to approve a program of reparations for its Black residents.

How did this happen, and can it be replicated in other parts of the country? 

Guest: Megan Twohey, an investigative reporter for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

The proposal in Evanston in March was pioneering: a blueprint to begin distributing $10 million in reparations to Black residents of the city in the form of housing grants.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-07-12
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From The Sunday Read Archives: ?Alone at Sea?

For Aleksander Doba, pitting himself against the wide-open sea ? storms, sunstroke, monotony, hunger and loneliness ? was a way to feel alive in old age. Today, listen to the story of a man who paddled toward the existential crisis that is life and crossed the Atlantic alone in a kayak. Three times.

Mr. Doba died on Feb. 22 on the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, Africa. He was 74.

This story was written by Elizabeth Weil and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2021-07-11
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The Assassination of Haiti?s President

Early on Wednesday morning, a group of men killed President Jovenel Moïse of Haiti in his residence on the outskirts of the capital, Port-au-Prince.

It was a brazen act. Very rarely is a nation?s leader killed in at home.

What does the attack means for Haiti?s future?

Guest: Maria Abi-Habib, bureau chief for Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean for The New York Times. 

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Background reading: 

The assassination of Mr. Moïse has rocked his nation, stoking fear and confusion about what is to come. Here is what we know and don?t know.The killing has left a political void and deepened the turmoil and violence that has gripped Haiti for months, threatening to tip one of the world?s most troubled nations further into lawlessness.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2021-07-09
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The End of America?s 20-Year War

After a 20-year war, the United States has effectively ended its operations in Afghanistan with little fanfare.

In recent weeks, the Americans have quietly vacated their sprawling military bases in the nation, and without giving Afghan security forces prior notice.

What does this withdrawal look like on the ground?

Guest: Thomas Gibbons-Neff, a correspondent in the Kabul bureau for The New York Times. 

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Background reading: 

The Americans have handed over Bagram Air Base ? once the military?s nerve center ? to the Afghans, effectively ending operations.Just a mile from the base, where U.S. forces departed on Thursday, shops sell items left over from two decades of fighting. Each one tells a story.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-07-08
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'Some Hope Is Better Than Having No Hope'

When the F.D.A. approved the drug Aduhelm, the first Alzheimer?s treatment to receive the agency?s endorsement in almost two decades, it gave hope to many.

But the decision was contentious; some experts say there?s not enough evidence that the treatment can address cognitive symptoms.

What is the story behind this new drug?

Guest: Pam Belluck, a health and science writer for The New York Times.  

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Background reading: 

Aduhelm, also known as aducanumab, was approved despite opposition from the F.D.A.?s independent advisory committee and some Alzheimer?s experts.Even those who supported the F.D.A.?s approval have said that authorizing it for anyone with the disease is much too broad.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-07-07
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The Rise of Delta

The Delta variant of the coronavirus is threatening to put the world in an entirely new stage of the pandemic.

The variant is spreading fast, particularly in places with low vaccination rates ? it is thought to be around 50 percent more transmissible than previous versions.

What can be done to stop Delta, and how will the variant hamper global efforts to return to normalcy?

Guest: Carl Zimmer, a science writer and author of the ?Matter? column for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

Vaccines are driving down coronavirus case numbers in the U.S., but it?s unclear whether Delta will reverse that trend. Here?s what scientists know about it.Conflicting advice from the health authorities about masks has bewildered a worried public.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-07-06
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The Debate Over Critical Race Theory

In Loudoun County, Va., a fierce debate has been raging for months inside normally sleepy school board meetings.

At the heart of this anger is critical race theory, a once obscure academic framework for understanding racism in the United States.

How, exactly, did critical race theory enter American public life, and what does this debate look like on the ground?

Guest: Trip Gabriel, a national correspondent for The New York Times. 

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Background reading: 

In a culture-war brawl that has spilled into the country?s education system, Republicans at the local, state and national levels are trying to block curriculums that emphasize systemic racism.More than 20 states have introduced legislation restricting lessons on racism and other so-called divisive concepts.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2021-07-02
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A New Era in College Sports

Throughout its 115-year history, the N.C.A.A.?s bedrock principle has been that student-athletes should be amateurs and not allowed to profit off their fame.

This week, after years of agitation and legislation, the rule was changed.

What will this new era of college sports look like?

Guest: Alan Blinder, a reporter covering college sports for The New York Times. 

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Background reading: 

Here?s a breakdown of why the N.C.A.A. finally relented to pressure to allow athletes to make money beyond the cost of attending their universities.Despite the N.C.A.A?s argument that payments would be a threat to amateurism, this month, the Supreme Court backed payments to student-athletes.

For more information on today?s episode, visit 

nytimes.com/thedaily

. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2021-07-01
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Inside the U.F.O. Report

Recently, the government released a long-awaited report: a look at unexplained aerial phenomena.

We explore the report and what implications it may have. Will it do anything to quell theories of extraterrestrial visitors?

Guest: Julian E. Barnes, a national security reporter for The New York Times. 

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Background reading: 

The United States has no explanation for unidentified objects, but the report stops short of ruling out aliens.Rather than explaining when sightings of U.F.O.s were really just sightings of top-secret planes, the government has sometimes allowed public eagerness about the possibility of aliens to take hold.U.F.O.s were once a taboo topic for the federal government, but not anymore. Why are we all talking about them now?

For more information on today?s episode, visit 

nytimes.com/thedaily

. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2021-06-30
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The Collapse of Champlain Towers

A few years ago, engineers sounded alarm bells about Champlain Towers, a residential building in Surfside, Fla. Last week, disaster struck and the towers collapsed. At least 11 residents have been confirmed dead and 150 more are still unaccounted for.

What caused the building to fail, and why are so many people still missing?

Guest: Patricia Mazzei, the Miami bureau chief for The New York Times. 

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Background reading: 

The collapse of Champlain Towers may be one of the deadliest accidental collapses in American history. Here are the key facts.Some engineers looking at the building?s failure said that the collapse appeared to have begun somewhere near the bottom of the structure.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2021-06-29
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What the Japanese Think of the Olympics

After last year?s postponement, both the International Olympic Committee and the Japanese government are determined that the Tokyo Games will take place this summer.

But the public in Japan appears unconvinced: About 85 percent of people say they fear that the Olympics will cause a rebound of the virus in the country.

Will the sense of discontent fade as the Games begin?

Guest: Motoko Rich, the Tokyo bureau chief for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

Why haven?t the Tokyo Games been canceled? The answer lies in billions of dollars, years of work and thousands of athletes who can?t wait any longer.Japan?s latest outbreak is receding and vaccinations are slowly picking up, but health experts warn that the government must remain vigilant.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2021-06-28
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The Sunday Read: ?The Woman Who Made van Gogh?

Neglected by art history for decades, Jo van Gogh-Bonger, the sister-in-law to Vincent van Gogh, is finally being recognized as the force who opened the world?s eyes to his genius.

This story was written by Russell Shorto and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2021-06-27
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From Opinion: Anthony Fauci Is Pissed Off

On this episode of Sway, a podcast from NYT Opinion, America?s chief immunologist responds to the recent leak of his emails, being compared to Hitler, and weighs in on the Wuhan lab-leak theory. 

Every Monday and Thursday on Sway, Kara Swisher investigates power: who has it, who?s been denied it and who dares to defy it. Subscribe to the show wherever you listen to podcasts.

2021-06-26
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Day X, Part 5: Defensive Democracy

In this episode, we get answers on just how bad the problem of far-right infiltration in the German military and police really is ? and how Germany is trying to address it. 

We learn about Germany's "defensive democracy," which was designed after World War II to protect the country against threats from the inside. One of those threats, according to some German officials, is the Alternative for Germany, widely known by its German initials AfD. We meet intelligence officials who have put parts of the party under formal surveillance.

2021-06-25
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The Struggles of India?s Vaccine Giant

When the coronavirus hit, the Serum Institute of India, the world?s largest vaccine maker, seemed uniquely positioned to help. It struck a deal with AstraZeneca, promising a billion vaccine doses to low- and middle-income nations. 

Earlier this year, a ban instituted by Prime Minister Narendra Modi put a stop to those plans. 

What has that meant for the nations promised millions of doses?

Guest: Emily Schmall, a South Asia correspondent for The New York Times based in New Delhi. 

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Background reading: 

The Serum Institute vowed to protect its country from the coronavirus and inoculate the world?s poor, but India?s crisis has pushed it past its limits.Big-power muscle flexing helps explain many of the world?s vaccine inequities, but there?s another problem: The manufacturing challenge is unprecedented.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-06-24
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Lessons from the Demise of a Voting Rights Bill

The For the People Act, a bill created by House Democrats after the 2018 midterm elections, could have been the most sweeping expansion of voting rights in a generation.

On Tuesday night, however, Senate Republicans filibustered the bill before it could even be debated.

What lessons can we take from its demise? 

Guest: Nicholas Fandos, a congressional correspondent for The New York Times. 

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Background reading: 

By blocking the sweeping voting rights bill, Republicans dealt a blow to Democrats? attempts to counter a wave of state-level ballot restrictions, while also supercharging a campaign to end the legislative filibuster.In the wake of the bill?s demise, Democrats and civil rights groups have reaffirmed their resolve to fight for voting protections in Congress.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2021-06-23
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Policing and the New York Mayoral Race

In the wake of last year?s Black Lives Matter protests, a central question of the New York City mayoral contest has become: Is New York safer with more or fewer police officers?

Today, we see this tension play out in a single household, between Yumi Mannarelli and her mother, Misako Shimada.

Guests: Misako Shimada and Yumi Mannarelli, a mother and daughter who live in New York City. 

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Background reading: 

The New York City mayoral race has been fluid, but the centrality of crime and policing has remained constant. 

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2021-06-22
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A Crucial Voting Rights Decision

How does the 1965 Voting Rights Act work? That is the question in front of the Supreme Court as it rules on a pair of Arizona laws from 2016 ? the most important voting rights case in a decade.

What arguments have been made in the case? And what implications will the decision have?

Guest: Adam Liptak, a reporter covering the United States Supreme Court for The New York Times. 

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Background reading: 

The Supreme Court has signaled that it could tighten the standards for using the Voting Rights Act to challenge all kinds of voting restrictions.The sprawling voting rights legislation known as H.R. 1, could result in lawsuits leading to a dozen Supreme Court cases, according to legal experts.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-06-21
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The Sunday Read: ?Finding My Father?

During his childhood, Nicholas Casey, Madrid bureau chief for The New York Times, received visits from his father. He would arrive from some faraway place where the ships on which he worked had taken him, regaling his son with endless stories. He had black curly hair like Nicholas?s and the beard he would one day grow.

But then after Nicholas?s seventh birthday, he vanished.

The familial riddle that plagued him would remain unsolved until his 33rd birthday with a gift from his mother: an ancestry test.

This story was written by Nicholas Casey and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2021-06-20
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Day X, Part 4: Franco A.

We meet Franco A., an officer in the German military who lived a double life as a Syrian refugee and stands accused of plotting an act of terrorism to bring down the German government.

2021-06-18
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The Transformation of Ralph Northam

In 2019, it seemed to many that Gov. Ralph Northam?s career was over.

That year, the Democratic governor of Virginia became embroiled in a highly publicized blackface scandal centered on a racist picture in his medical-school yearbook. There were widespread calls for his resignation.

Two years later, Mr. Northam has emerged as the most racially progressive leader in the state?s history. How did it happen?

Guest: Astead W. Herndon, a national political reporter for The New York Times. 

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Background reading: 

When a racist picture was discovered on his yearbook page, Ralph Northam refused to resign. Now he?s leaving office with a widely praised progressive record on racial justice.Virginia?s governor survived a blackface scandal with the help of Black Democrats, who saw a chance for policy concessions. Both got more from the relationship than they could have imagined.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2021-06-17
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The War in Tigray

This episode contains descriptions of sexual violence.

Just a few years ago, Ethiopia?s leader was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Now, the nation is in the grips of a civil war, with widespread reports of massacres and human rights abuses, and a looming famine that could strike millions in the northern region of Tigray. 

How did Ethiopia get here?

Guest: Declan Walsh, the chief Africa correspondent for The New York Times. 

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Background reading: 

Thousands of Ethiopians have fled the country and given accounts of a devastating and complex conflict. A U.S. report found that officials are leading a systematic campaign of ethnic cleansing in the northern region of Tigray.United Nations agencies have said the crisis in the Tigray region had plunged it into famine. It?s  a starvation calamity bigger at the moment than anywhere else in the world.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2021-06-16
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Why Billionaires Pay So Little Tax

Jeff Bezos, Michael Bloomberg, Elon Musk and George Soros are household names. They are among the wealthiest people in the United States.

But a recent report by ProPublica has found another thing that separates them from regular Americans citizens: They have paid almost nothing in taxes.

Why does the U.S. tax system let that happen?

Guest: Jonathan Weisman, a congressional correspondent for The New York Times. 

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Background reading: 

An analysis by ProPublica showed that from 2014 to 2018, the nation?s richest executives paid just a fraction of their wealth in taxes ? $13.6 billion in federal income taxes during a time when their collective net worth reportedly increased by $401 billion.The exposé has refocused attention on the tax code and how it applies to the superrich.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2021-06-15
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Apple?s Bet on China

Apple built the world?s most valuable business by figuring out how to make China work for Apple.

A New York Times investigation has found that the dynamic has now changed. China has figured out how to make Apple work for China.

Guest: Jack Nicas, who covers technology from San Francisco for The New York Times. He is one of the reporters behind the investigation into Apple?s compromises in China.

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Background reading: 

An investigation from The New York Times offers an extensive inside look at how Apple has given in to escalating demands from the Chinese authorities.One of the compromises Apple made to China was storing its Chinese customers? data on servers controlled by the Chinese government. Here are four more takeaways from the report.In the United States, data requests have placed Apple and other tech giants in an uncomfortable position between law enforcement, the courts and the customers whose privacy they have promised to protect.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-06-14
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From The Sunday Read Archives: ?My Mustache, My Self?

During months of pandemic isolation, Wesley Morris, a critic at large for The New York Times, decided to grow a mustache.

The reviews were mixed and predictable. He heard it described as ?porny? and ?creepy,? as well as ?rugged? and ?extra gay.?

It was a comment on a group call, however, that gave him pause. Someone noted that his mustache made him look like a lawyer for the N.A.A.C.P.?s legal defense fund.

?It was said as a winking correction and an earnest clarification ? Y?all, this is what it is,? Wesley said. ?The call moved on, but I didn?t. That is what it is: one of the sweetest, truest things anybody had said about me in a long time.?

On today?s episode of The Sunday Read, Wesley Morris?s story about Blackness and the symbolic power of the mustache.

This story was written by Wesley Morris and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2021-06-13
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Day X, Part 3: Blind Spot 2.0

Franco A. is not the only far-right extremist in Germany discovered by chance. For over a decade, 10 murders in the country, including nine victims who were immigrants, went unsolved. The neo-Nazi group responsible was discovered only when a bank robbery went wrong. 

In this episode, we ask: Why has a country that spent decades atoning for its Nazi past so often failed to confront far-right extremism?

2021-06-11
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The Unlikely Pioneer Behind mRNA Vaccines

When she was at graduate school in the 1970s, Dr. Katalin Kariko learned about something that would become a career-defining obsession: mRNA.

She believed in the potential of the molecule, but for decades ran up against institutional roadblocks. Then, the coronavirus hit and her obsession would help shield millions from a once-in-a-century pandemic. 

Today, a conversation with Dr. Kariko about her journey. 

Guest: Gina Kolata, a reporter covering science and medicine for The New York Times. 

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Background reading: 

Collaborating with devoted colleagues, Dr. Kariko laid the groundwork for the mRNA vaccines turning the tide of the pandemic.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-06-10
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The Bill That United the Senate

The Senate passed the largest piece of industrial policy seen in the U.S. in decades on Tuesday, directing about a quarter of a trillion dollars to bolster high-tech industries.

In an era where lawmakers can?t seem to agree on anything, why did they come together for this?

Guest: David E. Sanger, a White House and national security correspondent for The New York Times. 

 

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The Daily is doing a live online event: We follow up with students and faculty from our series Odessa. And we hear from the team who made the documentary. Times subscribers can join us June 10.

Background reading: 

The wide margin of support in the Senate reflects a sense of urgency among lawmakers in both parties about shoring up the technological and industrial capacity of the United States.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-06-09
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Who is Hacking the U.S. Economy?

In the past few weeks, some of the biggest industries in the U.S. have been held up by cyberattacks.

The first big infiltration was at Colonial Pipeline, a major conduit of gas, jet fuel and diesel to the East Coast. Then, J.B.S., one of the world?s largest beef suppliers, was hit.

The so-called ransomware attacks have long been a worry. But who are the hackers and how can they be stopped?

Guest: Nicole Perlroth, a reporter covering cybersecurity and digital espionage for The New York Times. 

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The Daily is doing a live online event: We follow up with students and faculty from our series Odessa. And we hear from the team who made the documentary. Times subscribers can join us June 10.

Background reading: 

The Biden administration has taken steps to counter the growing threat of cyberattacks on U.S. businesses. The F.B.I. director compares the danger of ransomware to the 9/11 terror threat.As the ransomware industry exploded, a Russian-speaking outfit called DarkSide offered would-be computer criminals not just the tools, but also customer support. Here?s how the group became a hacking powerhouse.It?s been almost a decade since Leon Panetta, then the secretary of defense, warned of an impending ?Cyber Pearl Harbor.? He didn?t want to be right.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-06-08
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Will Netanyahu Fall?

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel has always sold himself as a peerless defender of his country. In the minds of many Israelis, he has become a kind of indispensable leader for the nation?s future.

Despite that image, Mr. Netanyahu, Israel?s longest-serving prime minister, might soon be ousted from office.

What has given his rivals the momentum to try to topple him? And who might be his replacement?

Guest: David M. Halbfinger, who covered Israel, the occupied Palestinian territories and the Middle East as the Jerusalem bureau chief of The New York Times. 

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The Daily is doing a live online event: We follow up with students and faculty from our series Odessa. And we hear from the team who made the documentary. Times subscribers can join us June 10.

Background reading: 

Mr. Netanyahu, a dominant figure who has pushed his nation?s politics to the right, is on the verge of losing power.The main players in the latest twist in Israeli politics have very different agendas, but one common goal. Can they change Israel?

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-06-07
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The Sunday Read: ?The Native Scholar Who Wasn't?

Andrea Smith had long been an outspoken activist and academic in the Native American community. Called an icon of ?Native American feminism,? she was nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize for her advocacy work and has aligned herself with prominent activists such as Angela Davis.

Last fall, however, a number of academics, including Ms. Smith, were outed as masquerading as Black, Latino or Indigenous.

While many of them explained themselves and the lies they told, Ms. Smith never did. Why?

This story was written by Sarah Viren and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2021-06-06
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Bonus: Ezra Klein Talks to Obama About How America Went From ?Yes We Can? to ?MAGA?

On this episode of The Ezra Klein Show, former President Barack Obama discusses Joe Biden, aliens and what he got right and wrong during his two terms in office.

Each Tuesday and Friday for The New York Times Opinion section, Ezra Klein invites you into a conversation on something that matters. Subscribe to the show wherever you listen to podcasts.

2021-06-05
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Day X, Part 2: In the Stomach

Franco A. visited the workplaces of two of his alleged targets. We meet both targets to hear the stories of two Germanies: One a beacon of liberal democracy that has worked to overcome its Nazi past, the other a place where that past is attracting new recruits. 

Today, we explore how Germany's history is informing the fight for the country?s future.

2021-06-04
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Inside the Texas Legislature

Over the weekend, months of tension in the Texas Legislature came to a head. A group of Democratic lawmakers got up and left the building before a vote ? an act of resistance amid the most conservative Texas legislative session in recent memory. 

The population of Texas is becoming less old, less white and less Republican, so why is its Legislature moving further right?

Guest: Manny Fernandez, the Los Angeles bureau chief for The New York Times. He spent more than nine years covering Texas as the Houston bureau chief.

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Background reading: 

The recent session that pushed Texas further to the right, at a time when it seemed least likely to do so ? as the state becomes younger, less white and less Republican.After Democrats killed a bill to restrict voting in the state, Republicans pledged to pass it in a special legislative session. A new fight looms

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2021-06-03
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