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The Daily

The Daily

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro and Sabrina Tavernise. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

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Episodes

About Those Documents at Mar-a-Lago

Last week, the F.B.I. took the extraordinary step of searching Mar-a-Lago, former President Donald J. Trump?s private club and Florida home. Their goal? To find materials he was thought to have improperly removed from the White House, including classified documents.

An inventory of the material taken from the search showed that agents seized 11 sets of documents with some type of confidential or secret marking on them.

We explore some of the latest developments in the case.

Guest: Maggie Haberman, a White House correspondent for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

Mr. Trump and his allies have given often conflicting defenses of his retention of classified documents. These shifting explanations follow a familiar playbook.The Justice Department?s warrant for the search and two critical supporting memos shed considerable light on the Mar-a-Lago investigation.Here?s a timeline of the former president?s false and misleading statements on the search.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2022-08-18
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The Summer of Airline Chaos

Across the United States, airline travel this summer has been roiled by canceled flights, overbooked planes, disappointment and desperation.

Two and a half years after the pandemic began and with restrictions easing, why is flying still such an unpleasant experience?

Guest: Niraj Chokshi, a business reporter for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

The question for many travelers is whether they can trust airlines to get them where they want to go on time. Here is what to know about the air travel mess.Travelers on both sides of the Atlantic have endured long lines, delays or cancellations, and plenty of frustration. Is this the new normal?

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2022-08-17
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The Taliban Takeover, One Year Later

One year ago this week, when the Taliban retook control of Afghanistan, they promised to institute a modern form of Islamic government that honored women?s rights.

That promise evaporated with a sudden decision to prohibit girls from going to high school, prompting questions about which part of the Taliban is really running the country.

Guest: Matthieu Aikins, a writer based in Afghanistan for The New York Times and the author of ?The Naked Don?t Fear the Water: An Underground Journey with Afghan Refugees.?

Background reading: 

After barring girls from high school ? and harboring a leader of Al Qaeda ? the Taliban risks jeopardizing the billions of dollars of global aid that keeps Afghans alive.

For more information on today?s episode, visit 

nytimes.com/thedaily

. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2022-08-16
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The Tax Loophole That Won?t Die

Carried interest is a loophole in the United States tax code that has stood out for its egregious unfairness and stunning longevity. 

Typically, the richest of the rich pay 40 percent tax on their income. The very narrow, select group that benefits from carried interest pays only 20 percent. 

Earlier versions of the Inflation Reduction Act targeted carried interest. But the loophole has survived. Senator Kyrsten Sinema, Democrat of Arizona, demanded her party get rid of efforts to eliminate it in exchange for her support. 

How has the carried interest loophole lasted so long despite its obvious unfairness? 

Guest: Andrew Ross Sorkin, a columnist for The New York Times and the founder and editor-at-large of DealBook.

Background reading: 

What is the carried interest loophole and why hasn?t it been closed by now?Ms. Sinema?s puzzling defense of the loophole.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-08-15
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The Sunday Read: ?How One Restaurateur Transformed America?s Energy Industry?

It was a long-shot bet on liquid natural gas, but it paid off handsomely ? and turned the United States into a leading fossil-fuel exporter.

The journalist Jake Bittle delves into the storied career of Charif Souki, the Lebanese American entrepreneur whose aptitude for risk changed the course of the American energy business.

The article outlines how Mr. Souki rose from being a Los Angeles restaurant owner to becoming the co-founder and chief executive of Cheniere Energy, an oil and gas company that specialized in liquefied natural gas, and provides an insight into his thought process: ?As Souki sees it,? Mr. Bittle writes, ?the need to provide the world with energy in the short term outweighs the long-term demand of acting on carbon emissions.?

In a time of acute climate anxiety, Mr. Souki?s rationale could strike some as outdated, even brazen. The world may be facing energy and climate crises, Mr. Souki told The New York Times, ?but one is going to happen this month, and the other one is going to happen in 40 years.?

?If you tell somebody, ?You are going to run out of electricity this month,? and then you talk to the same person about what?s going to happen in 40 years,? he said, ?they will tell you, ?What do I care about 40 years from now???

This story was written by Jake Bittle and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

 

2022-08-14
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Boy Scouts or Girl Scouts?

Five years ago, after decades of resistance, the Boy Scouts of America made a momentous change, allowing girls to participate. Since then, tens of thousands have joined.

Today we revisit a story, first aired in 2017, about 10-year-old twins deciding which group to join, and find out what?s happened to them since.

Background reading: 

In 2017, the decision to open up the Boy Scouts was celebrated by many women but criticized by the Girl Scouts, which said that girls flourish in all-female groups.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-08-12
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Pregnant at 16

This episode contains strong language and descriptions of an abortion.

With the end of Roe v. Wade, Louisiana has become one of the most difficult places in the United States to get an abortion. The barriers are expected to disproportionately affect Black women, the largest group to get abortions in the state.

Today, we speak to Tara Wicker and Lakeesha Harris, two women in Louisiana whose lives led them to very different positions in the fight over abortion access.

Background reading: 

The Supreme Court decision to reverse Roe, far from settling the matter, has kindled court and political battles that are likely to go on for years.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-08-11
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The F.B.I. Search of Trump?s Home

On Monday, federal agents descended on Mar-a-Lago, the private club and Florida home of former President Donald J. Trump, reportedly looking for classified documents and presidential papers.

Trump supporters expressed outrage about the agency?s actions, while many Democrats reacted with glee. But what do we know about the search, and what comes next?

Guest: Maggie Haberman, a White House correspondent for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

The search at Mar-a-Lago was the culmination of a lengthy conflict between a president proud of his disdain for rules and officials charged with protecting the nation?s records and secrets.Experts say that the Justice Department would have carefully weighed the decision to carry out the search, suggesting that the investigation is serious and fairly advanced.Here is the timeline leading up to the search.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-08-10
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How Democrats Salvaged a History-Making Bill

This weekend, Democrats passed legislation that would make historic investments to fight climate change and lower the cost of prescription drugs ? paid for by raising taxes on businesses.

How did the party finally make progress on the bill, and what effects will it have?

Guest: Emily Cochrane, a Washington-based correspondent for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

Here?s what is in the climate, tax and health care package.How Senator Joe Manchin turned from a holdout into a deal maker.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-08-09
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The Alex Jones Verdict and the Fight Against Disinformation

This episode contains descriptions of distressing scenes. 

In a landmark ruling, a jury in Texas ordered Alex Jones, America?s most prominent conspiracy theorist, to pay millions of dollars to the parents of a boy killed at Sandy Hook for the damage caused by his lies about the mass shooting.

What is the significance of the trial, and will it do anything to change the world of lies and misinformation?

Guest: Elizabeth Williamson, a feature writer based in the Washington bureau of The New York Times.

Background reading: 

What to know about the defamation case against Alex Jones, the far-right conspiracy theorist who used his Infowars media company to spread lies about the Sandy Hook school shooting.The parents of a child killed in the Sandy Hook shooting were awarded $45.2 million in punitive damages at the conclusion of the trial

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-08-08
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The Sunday Read: 'Why Was Joshua Held for More Than Two Years for Someone Else?s Crimes?'

The more he insisted that his name was Joshua, the more delusional he came to be seen.

Journalist Robert Kolker tells us the remarkable story of Joshua Spriestersbach, a homeless man who wound up serving more than two years in a Honolulu jail for crimes committed by someone else.

It was a case of mistaken identity that developed into ?a slow-motion game of hot potato between the police, the courts, the jails and the hospitals,? Mr. Kolker writes. He delves into how homelessness and mental illness shaped Mr. Spriestersbach?s adult life, two factors that led him into a situation in which he had little control ? a bureaucratic wormhole that commandeered and consumed two and a half years of his life.

This story was written by Robert Kolker and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2022-08-07
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Vacationing in the Time of Covid

Charles Falls Jr., known as Chillie, loves to take cruises. But Covid, as it has done for so many, left him marooned at home in Virginia.

As he told Cristal Duhaime, a producer at the Times podcast First Person, as soon as restrictions eased, he eagerly planned a return to the waves. But for Chillie, who suffers from prostate cancer, resuming his beloved travels ? particularly aboard the cramped quarters of a cruise ship, most people?s idea of a pandemic nightmare ? was especially perilous.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-08-05
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How to Interpret the Kansas Referendum on Abortion

This episode contains mention of sexual assault. 

Kansas this week became the first U.S. state since the fall of Roe v. Wade to put the question of abortion directly to the electorate.

The result was resounding. Voters chose overwhelmingly to preserve abortion rights, an outcome that could have important political reverberations for the rest of the country.

Guest: Mitch Smith, a correspondent covering the Midwest and the Great Plains for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

The defeat of the ballot measure in Kansas was the most tangible demonstration yet of a political backlash against the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe.The result relied on a broad coalition of voters who turned out in huge numbers and crashed through party and geographic lines.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-08-04
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Why Democrats Are Bankrolling Far-Right Candidates

Democrats are meddling in Republican primaries this year to an unusual degree, attempting to elevate extremist candidates who they think will be easy to defeat in midterms in the fall.

Nowhere has that strategy been more divisive than in the election for a House seat in Michigan.

Guest: Jonathan Weisman, a congressional correspondent for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

The meddling in Republican primaries has prompted angry finger-pointing and a debate among Democrats over the perils and wisdom of the strategy.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-08-03
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The Killing of bin Laden?s Successor

On Monday, President Biden announced that the United States had killed Ayman al-Zawahri in a drone strike in Afghanistan. 

Al-Zawahri was the leader of Al Qaeda. A long time number two to Osama bin Laden and the intellectual spine of the terrorist group, he assumed power after bin Laden was killed by U.S. in 2011. 

Who was al-Zawahri, and what does his death mean for Afghanistan?s relationship with the United States and for the threat of global terrorism? 

Guest: Eric Schmitt, a senior correspondent covering national security for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

The drone strike that killed al-Zawahri, a key plotter of the 9/11 attacks, capped a 21-year manhunt. Killed at 71, al-Zawahri led a life of secrecy and violence

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-08-02
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How Monkeypox Went From Containable to Crisis

In mid-June, cases of monkeypox were in the double digits in the United States. There were drug treatments and vaccines against it. There didn?t seem to be any reason for alarm.

But in the weeks since, the virus has spread rapidly across the country, with some local and state officials declaring public health emergencies.

Guest: Apoorva Mandavilli, a science and global health reporter for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

Longstanding weaknesses in the American public health system are giving monkeypox a chance to become entrenched.Here are answers to three pressing questions about how the virus spreads and how it can be treated.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-08-01
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The Sunday Read: ?Inside the Push to Diversify the Book Business?

For generations, America?s major publishers focused almost entirely on white readers. Now a new cadre of executives is trying to open up the industry.

The journalist Marcela Valdes spent a year reporting on what she described as ?the problematic history of diversity in book publishing and the ways it has affected editors, authors and what you see (or don?t see) in bookstores.?

Interviewing more than 50 current and former book professionals, as well as authors, Ms. Valdes learned about the previous unsuccessful attempts to cultivate Black audiences, and considered the intricacies of an industry culture that still struggles to ?overcome the clubby, white elitism it was born in.?

As one publishing executive puts it, the future of book publishing will be determined not only by its recent hires but also by how it answers this question: Instead of fighting over slices of a shrinking pie, can publishers work to make the readership bigger for everyone?

This story was written by Marcela Valdes and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

 

2022-07-31
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The Rise of the Conservative Latina

For decades, Republicans have sought to make gains with a critical voting block: Latinos.

Last month, when Mayra Flores was elected to Congress from Texas, she finally showed them a way to gain that support. Today, we explore what her campaign tells us about the future of the Latino vote.

Guest: Jennifer Medina, a national reporter for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

Ms. Flores has leaned into her personal story to persuade voters with conservative values that it?s time to give the Republicans a try.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-07-29
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How Expecting Inflation Can Actually Create More Inflation

To fight historic levels of inflation, the Federal Reserve this week, once again, raised interest rates, its most powerful weapon against rising prices.

The move was intended to slow demand, but there was also a psychological factor: If consumers become convinced that inflation is a permanent feature of the economy, that might become a self-fulfilling prophecy.

Guest: Jeanna Smialek, a correspondent covering the Federal Reserve and the economy for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

The Federal Reserve has pushed up borrowing costs at the fastest pace in decades.The New York Times invited readers to share their thoughts about the price rises and asked how much more inflation they expected.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-07-28
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How Deshaun Watson Became the N.F.L.'s Biggest Scandal

This episode contains details of alleged sexual assault. 

In the past year, more than 20 women have accused the star N.F.L. quarterback Deshaun Watson of sexual misconduct.

Despite the allegations, Watson has signed one of the most lucrative contracts in the history of football, with the Cleveland Browns, and will take the field today for training camp.

Guest: Jenny Vrentas, a sports reporter for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

The accusations have been frequent and startling: More than two dozen women have said that Watson harassed or assaulted them. Watson and his lawyers say the encounters were innocuous.N.F.L. players pay a small price when accused of violence against women, a peer-reviewed study has found.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-07-27
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How Roe?s Demise Could Safeguard Gay Marriage

After Roe v. Wade was overturned, Democrats introduced a bill to prevent the right to gay marriage from meeting the same fate as the right to abortion.

The bill was expected to go nowhere, but it has won more and more Republican support and now seems to have a narrow path to enactment.

Guest: Annie Karni, a congressional correspondent for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

Larger-than-expected Republican support in the House for legislation to codify marriage equality caught both parties off guard.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-07-26
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Death of a Crypto Company

Born in response to the 2008 financial crisis, cryptocurrency was supposed be a form of money that eliminated the traditional gatekeepers who had overseen the tanking of the economy.

But a crash in value recently has raised questions about cryptocurrency?s central promise.

Guest: David Yaffe-Bellany, a reporter covering cryptocurrencies and fintech for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

No one wanted to miss out on the cryptocurrency mania. A global industry worth hundreds of billions of dollars rose up practically overnight. Now it is crashing down.Celsius Network was managing more than $20 billion in assets. Last month, it became the latest crypto venture to spiral into a crisis.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-07-25
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The Sunday Read: ?The Books About Sex That Every Family Should Read?

How do you teach your child about sex? It?s a perennial question that has spawned hundreds of illustrated books meant to demystify sexual intercourse.

But for the Canadian author Cory Silverberg, there was something lacking. Silverberg, who uses they/them pronouns, felt that books on sex aimed at children often omitted mention of intimacy in the context of disability or gender nonconformity. And so they set about making a book of their own.

They wanted to tell a story of how babies are made that would apply to all kinds of children, whether they were conceived the traditional way or through reproductive technologies, whether they live with adoptive or biological parents, and no matter their family configuration.

The book critic Elaine Blair, who had also felt that children?s literature on sex was a little thin on inclusivity, recalls being drawn in by the fact that Silverberg?s ?Sex is a Funny Word? is one of few children?s books that contend with the fact that children encounter representations of sexuality in the media.

Ms. Blair met up with Silverberg in Houston to understand the germ of the idea and the editorial process of delivering the book, from conception to print.

This story was written by Elaine Blair and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

 

2022-07-24
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Utah?s ?Environmental Nuclear Bomb?

The Great Salt Lake is drying up.

Soaring demand for water, exacerbated by drought and higher temperatures in the region, are shrinking the waters, which play such a crucial role in the landscape, ecology and weather of Salt Lake City and Utah.

Can the lake be saved?

Guest: Christopher Flavelle, a climate reporter for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

Utah?s dilemma raises a core question as the United States heats up: How quickly are Americans willing to adapt to the effects of climate change, even as those effects become urgent, obvious, and potentially catastrophic?

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-07-22
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The Case Against Donald Trump

A series of blockbuster hearings from the Jan. 6 committee has put growing pressure on Attorney General Merrick B. Garland to bring criminal charges against former President Donald J. Trump over the efforts to overturn the 2020 election.

Before today?s committee hearing, we speak with Andrew D. Goldstein, one of the prosecutors who led the last major investigation into Mr. Trump, about why winning a case against the former president is such a challenge.

Guest: Andrew Goldstein, a federal prosecutor who was part of the Mueller inquiry into Mr. Trump. 

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Background reading: 

Mr. Trump has issued a rambling 12-page statement containing his usual mix of outlandish claims, hyperbole and outright falsehoods, but also, apparently, with something different: the beginnings of a legal defense.Robert S. Mueller III was often portrayed as the omnipotent fact-gatherer for his inquiry, but it was Mr. Goldstein who had a much more involved, day-to-day role. (Here?s our profile of Mr. Goldstein from 2019.)

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-07-21
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How Abortion Bans Are Restricting Miscarriage Care

Across the United States, Republicans emboldened by the overturning of Roe v. Wade are passing laws intended to stop medical staff from providing an abortion.

But those same laws may also be scaring health workers out of providing basic care for miscarriages.

Guest: Pam Belluck, a health and science writer for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

Although post-Roe laws are technically intended to apply only to abortions, some patients have reported hurdles receiving standard surgical procedures or medication for the loss of desired pregnancies.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-07-20
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Broken Climate Pledges and Europe?s Heat Wave

A record-breaking heat wave is currently washing over Europe. In parts of Britain, the mercury has hit a freakishly high 100 degrees Fahrenheit or more.

While that is happening, both Europe and the United States ? two of the world?s largest contributors to global warming ? are abandoning key commitments to limit emissions.

Guest: Somini Sengupta, the international climate reporter for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia, an ardent champion of the fossil fuel industry, has almost single-handedly doused any hopes of immediate climate action in Washington.The European Parliament recently endorsed labeling some gas and nuclear energy projects ?green.? Critics said it would prolong the reliance on fossil fuels.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-07-19
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When Biden Met M.B.S.

In the past, President Biden has called Saudi Arabia a ?pariah? for its human rights abuses and said that he would never meet with its de facto ruler, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

But Mr. Biden?s first trip as president to the Middle East included talks with the prince. What prompted the change in course?

Guest: Ben Hubbard, the Beirut bureau chief for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

Mr. Biden?s visit to Saudi Arabia garnered scathing criticism and modest accords.An unspoken result of Mr. Biden?s meeting with Prince Mohammed: A setback in the case of Jamal Khashoggi, a journalist who was killed by Saudi agents in 2018.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-07-18
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The Sunday Read: ?Want to Do Less Time? A Prison Consultant Might Be Able to Help.?

People heading to court often turn to the internet for guidance. In so doing, many come across the work of Justin Paperny, who dispenses advice on his YouTube channel. His videos offer preparation advice and help manage expectations, while providing defendants information to be able to hold their current lawyers accountable, and to try to negotiate a lighter sentence.

Mr. Paperny, a former financial criminal, also leads White Collar Advice with his partner Michael Santos, another former convict. The firm is made up of 12 convicted felons who each have their own consulting specialty based on where they served time and their own sentencing experiences.

The journalist Jack Hitt relates the story of the two men and the details of their firm, which ?fills a need in 21st-century America.? It is, Mr. Hitt writes, ?a natural market outgrowth of a continuing and profound shift in America?s judicial system.?

This story was written by Jack Hitt recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2022-07-17
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A View of the Beginning of Time

Ancient galaxies carpeting the sky like jewels on black velvet. Fledgling stars shining out from deep within cumulus clouds of interstellar dust. Hints of water vapor in the atmosphere of a remote exoplanet.

This week, NASA released new images captured from a point in space one million miles from Earth.

Today, we discuss the James Webb Space Telescope, the world?s most powerful space observatory, its journey to launch and what it can teach us about the universe.

Guest: Kenneth Chang, a science reporter for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

Here are more scenes of the universe captured by the Webb telescope.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-07-15
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How Sri Lanka?s Economy Collapsed

In recent days, the political crisis in Sri Lanka has reached a critical point, with its president fleeing the country and protesters occupying his residence and office. Today, ?The Daily? explores how the island nation, whose economy was once held up as a success story in South Asia, came apart ? and why it?s a cautionary tale.

Guest: Emily Schmall, a South Asia correspondent for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

Yesterday, mass demonstrations and tear gas filled the streets of Colombo, the Sri Lankan capital, and late into the night, protesters clashed with the police outside Parliament.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-07-14
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Could the Midterms Be Tighter Than Expected?

For months, leaders of the Democratic Party and President Biden have been bracing for huge losses in the upcoming midterm elections. Today, ?The Daily? explores a new New York Times poll that complicates that thinking ? and could set the stage for a very different showdown in November.

Guest: Nate Cohn, a domestic correspondent for The Upshot at The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

Here?s what a new Times poll shows about divisions and dissatisfaction in the United States.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-07-13
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Can Elon Musk Get Out of Buying Twitter?

Last week, Elon Musk announced that he was pulling out of his $44 billion agreement to purchase Twitter. Today, we explore why a company that once tried to fend off this acquisition is now trying to force Mr. Musk to buy it.

Guest: Kate Conger, a technology reporter for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

Why Mr. Musk is leaving Twitter worse off than it was when he said he would buy it.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-07-12
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On Abortion Laws, It All Goes Back to 2010

When the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, the court?s conservative majority argued it was simply handing the question of abortion to the states and their voters to decide for themselves.

But in reality, the court was ensuring that many states, from Arizona to Ohio, would immediately ban the procedure without much debate, because their legislatures are now dominated by hard-line Republicans. Today, we tell the story of how those Republican legislators achieved that dominance.

Guest: Kate Zernike, a political reporter for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

How the beginning of the end of Roe v. Wade arrived on election night in November 2010.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-07-11
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The Sunday Read: ?The Rise and Fall of America?s Environmentalist Underground?

Warning of imminent ecological catastrophe, the Earth Liberation Front became notorious in the late 1990s for setting fire to symbols of ecological destruction, including timber mills, an S.U.V. dealership and a ski resort. The group was widely demonized. Its exploits were condemned by mainstream environmental groups, ridiculed by the media and inspired a furious crackdown from law enforcement.

But in 2022 the group is more relevant than ever. These days even America?s mainstream environmental movement has begun to take a more confrontational approach, having previously confined its activities largely to rallies, marches and other lawful forms of protest. Even the ?staid? environmental groups based in Washington have slowly started to embrace more radical tactics. Climate activists are starting to abandon their dogmatic attachment to pacifism, choosing instead to work toward destroying the ?machines? inflicting the damage ? but will such a radical idea prove effective?

The journalist Matthew Wolfe delves into the world of the activists, and questions the future of environmental activism.

This story was written by Matthew Wolfe and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2022-07-10
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The Final Days of Boris Johnson

After a flurry of ministerial resignations and calls from members of his own party for his departure, Boris Johnson agreed on Thursday to resign as prime minister of Britain.

During his tenure, Mr. Johnson survived a series of scandals and skated past a lot of bad news. But even he was unable to maneuver his way out of his latest misstep.

Guest: Mark Landler, the London bureau chief for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

Mr. Johnson?s resignation brought a messy end to a messy three-year tenure.Here?s a guide to why he was forced out and who might succeed him.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-07-08
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An Anti-Abortion Campaigner on the Movement?s Historic Win

After Roe v. Wade was decided in 1973, a group of conservative lawyers embarked on what would become a decades-long mission to reverse the ruling.

One of those lawyers, James Bopp, explains how they succeeded and what comes next.

Guest: James Bopp, general counsel for the National Right to Life Committee. 

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Background reading: 

Reaction to the Supreme Court?s decision reflected a polarized nation: jubilation and relief on one side, outrage and grief on the other. Both sides quickly pivoted to the fights ahead.Reversing the ruling in Roe v. Wade, far from settling the matter, has instead kindled court and political battles across the states that are likely to go on for years.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-07-07
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How Brittney Griner Became a Political Pawn

Brittney Griner, the American W.N.B.A. star who has been detained in Russia since February, recently sent a letter to President Biden. ?I?m terrified I might be here forever,? she wrote.

The White House vowed to use ?every tool? to bring Ms. Griner back to the United States, but organizing her release is a tricky proposition, complicated not least by Washington?s break with Moscow over the war in Ukraine.

Guest: Michael Crowley, a diplomatic correspondent for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

Brittney Griner has endured months in a Russian prison and faces the threat of years more.Her letter to Mr. Biden asked him to keep her case in mind. ?I realize you are dealing with so much, but please don?t forget about me and the other American detainees. Please do all you can to bring us home,? she wrote.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-07-06
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The Promises and Pitfalls of the New Gun Law

President Biden has heralded the recent gun safety bill as the most significant federal attempt to reduce gun violence in 30 years.

But after a gunman opened fire from a rooftop onto a Fourth of July parade in a Chicago suburb, questions abound about what the landmark legislation will ? and will not ? achieve.

Guest: Sheryl Gay Stolberg, a Washington correspondent covering health policy for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

Six people were killed and dozens more wounded in the deadly shooting at a parade in Highland Park, Ill., a suburb of Chicago. The police have taken a 22-year-old man into custody.Gun violence researchers have waged an often-frustrating battle to translate their findings into public policy.Here?s what is in the gun safety law ? officially called the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act ? and what was left out.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-07-05
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An Abortion Rights Champion of the 1970s on Life Before and After Roe

A little over 50 years ago, Nancy Stearns, a young lawyer, was presenting a case in New York with a bold legal assertion: that the right to abortion was fundamental to equal rights for women.

She never got to conclude her argument ? first New York changed the law, then came Roe v. Wade. Now, with Roe overturned, she describes how it feels to watch the right to terminate a pregnancy fall away.

Guest: Nancy Stearns, a lawyer who used an argument of equal rights to challenge the constitutionality of abortion bans.

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Background reading: 

The United States almost took a different path toward abortion rights. Abramowicz v. Lefkowitz was the first case in the country to challenge a state?s strict abortion law on behalf of women.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-07-01
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How Long Will Europe Support Ukraine?

At the start of Russia?s invasion of Ukraine, European leaders painted the battle in stark moral terms, imposing harsh sanctions against Russia and talking about President Volodymyr Zelensky as a hero.

But as the war drags on, different conversations have taken place behind the scenes to consider what Ukraine might need to give up to achieve peace.

Guest: Matina Stevis-Gridneff, the Brussels bureau chief for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

Countries in the Group of 7 face dueling pressures: Penalizing Russia while easing the economic pain at home.Chancellor Olaf Scholz of Germany and President Emmanuel Macron of France are expected to visit Ukraine on Thursday ? but they may face a tense reception.

For more information on today?s episode, visit 

nytimes.com/thedaily

. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2022-06-30
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An Explosive Jan. 6 Hearing

On Jan. 6, 2021, when supporters of Donald Trump stormed the Capitol, Cassidy Hutchinson was at work in the White House alongside her boss, Mark Meadows, then the chief of staff.

Her stunning testimony has provided a fly-on-the-wall account of what Mr. Trump knew about the events that day.

Guest: Luke Broadwater, a congressional reporter for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

Ms. Hutchinson?s evidence made her one of the most forceful and compelling witnesses to reveal details about Mr. Trump?s bizarre and violent behavior.The revelations could nudge Mr. Trump closer to facing criminal charges, legal experts said.Here?s a timeline of the key scenes in Ms. Hutchinson?s testimony.

For more information on today?s episode, visit 

nytimes.com/thedaily

. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2022-06-29
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The New U.S. Abortion Map

In the days since the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, states have rushed to either ban, restrict or protect abortion.

The different approaches have created a fragmented, patchwork map of America.

Guest: Margot Sanger-Katz, a domestic correspondent covering health care for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

With Roe overturned, the distances many women will need to travel for an abortion will increase drastically.Here are answers to some of the fundamental questions about the ramifications of the justices? decision.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-06-28
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Inside Four Abortion Clinics the Day Roe Ended

This episode contains strong language and mentions sexual assault.

The Supreme Court decision on Friday to overturn Roe v. Wade sent abortion clinics into a tailspin.

That day Rosenda, a receptionist at a family planning clinic in Arizona, spent eight hours on the phone telling women the clinic could no longer help them.

?I wanted to hug her, I wanted to help her but I know I can?t,? she said of one patient she called. ?I wanted to scream.?

In the hours after the decision, we spoke to clinic doctors and staff members trying to make sense of the news.

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Background reading: 

The overturning of Roe set off waves of triumph and of despair, from the protesters on either side massing in front of the Supreme Court, to abortion clinics and crisis pregnancy centers.Over the weekend, anti-abortion forces vowed to push for near-total bans in every state in the nation, and abortion rights groups insisted they would harness rage over the decision to fight back in the courts. See our updates from Sunday.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-06-27
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The Sunday Read: ?How Houston Moved 25,000 People From the Streets Into Homes of Their Own?

Michael Kimmelman, the architecture critic of The New York Times, traveled to Houston to observe an approach to chronic homelessness that has won widespread praise.

Houston, the nation?s fourth-most populous city, has moved more than 25,000 homeless people directly into apartments and houses in the past decade, an overwhelming majority of whom remain housed after two years.

This has been achieved through a ?housing first? practice: moving the most vulnerable from the streets directly into apartments, instead of shelters, without individuals being required to do a 12-step program, or to find a job.

Delving into the finer details of the process, Kimmelman considers the different logic ?housing first? involves. After all, ?when you?re drowning, it doesn?t help if your rescuer insists you learn to swim before returning you to shore,? he writes. ?You can address your issues once you?re on land. Or not. Either way, you join the wider population of people battling demons behind closed doors.?

This story was written and narrated by Michael Kimmelman. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2022-06-26
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Special Episode: Roe v. Wade Is Overturned

This episode contains strong language.

The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, a ruling that eliminates women?s constitutional right to abortion after almost 50 years. ?Roe was egregiously wrong from the start,? Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. wrote on behalf of the majority, while President Biden has denounced the court?s action as the ?realization of extreme ideology.? In this special episode, we explore how the court arrived at this landmark decision ? and how it will transform American life.

Guest: Adam Liptak, a reporter covering the Supreme Court for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

Read the majority decision that overruled Roe v. Wade, with notes by New York Times reporters.The court?s decision was one of the legacies of President Donald J. Trump, with all three of his appointees in the majority in the 6-to-3 ruling. Privately, the former president has called the reversal of Roe ?bad? for the Republican Party.Abortion is now banned in several states, with trigger laws in others set to take effect in the coming days. See where women would be most affected.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-06-25
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One Elite High School?s Struggle Over Admissions

A bitter debate about the criteria for enrolling students at Lowell, in California, has echoes of the soul-searching happening across the U.S. education system.

Guest: Jay Caspian Kang, a writer for Times Opinion and The New York Times Magazine; and Jessica Cheung, a senior audio producer for The Daily. 

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Background reading: 

The decision to replace Lowell High School?s admission process with a lottery system was a key factor at play in a recall election in February that ousted three members of San Francisco?s school board.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-06-24
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Bonus: A Major Ruling on Guns

In the most sweeping ruling on firearms in decades, the Supreme Court struck down a New York law today that had placed strict limits on carrying guns outside the home. The decision has far-reaching implications, particularly for six other states that have similar laws limiting guns in public. This evening, we revisit an episode from November 2021 that tells the story behind one of the most significant gun cases in American history.  

Guest: Adam Liptak, a reporter covering the Supreme Court for The New York Times.

2022-06-24
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The Supreme Court Case That Could Doom U.S. Climate Goals

While coming rulings on abortion and guns have garnered lots of attention, the Supreme Court is also set to make another major decision in a less-publicized suit involving climate change.

The case, about how far the Environmental Protection Agency can regulate greenhouse gas emissions from power plants, could affect the way the entire government makes rules and regulations.

Guest: Coral Davenport, a correspondent covering energy and environmental policy for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

Republican attorneys general and conservative allies have waged a multiyear campaign to tilt courts against climate action.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-06-23
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How Biden?s Approval Rating Got So Low

During his campaign for president and in his first year in office, Joe Biden tried to be all things to all people. But trying to govern on behalf of such a broad political coalition has left his administration with something of an identity crisis.

In alarming figures for Democrats ahead of the midterms, Mr. Biden?s approval rating has reached the lowest level of his presidency, while 70 percent of Americans say that the country is on the wrong track.

Guest: Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent for The New York Times.

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Background reading: 

Confidential polling data obtained by The Times highlights the biggest challenges for Mr. Biden and his party in this election year.The $1.9 trillion pandemic-relief law unleashed a giant wave of spending on local construction projects and programs. But Democratic candidates aren?t getting much credit for it.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-06-22
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