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The Daily

The Daily

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

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Episodes

Why the U.S. Is Running Out of Medical Supplies

States and cities across the United States are reporting dangerous shortages of the vital medical supplies needed to contain the coronavirus. Why is the world?s biggest economy suffering such a scramble to find lifesaving equipment?

Guest: Sarah Kliff, an investigative reporter covering health care for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

The scarcity of ventilators has become an emergency, forcing doctors to make life-or-death decisions. The collapse of a government effort to produce an emergency stockpile reveals much about the challenges now being faced in fighting the pandemic.This map of the United States shows gaps in the existing health care infrastructure ? and which areas may face a shortage of hospital beds as the virus spreads.
2020-03-31
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Back From the Brink

Across the United States, many hospitals are confronting their first cases of coronavirus. Today, we speak to New Jersey?s first confirmed coronavirus patient, a medical professional, about what having the virus was like for him, what he learned from the experience and why he thinks, ?America is not ready.?

Guests: Susan Dominus, a staff writer at The New York Times Magazine, spoke with James Cai, a physician assistant. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

James Cai was told his test for coronavirus had not been completed. Then he heard from the governor on the news that he was the first confirmed case in New Jersey. Why states must ask knotty questions about how much to tell the public ? and when.President Trump, listening to his health advisers, has said that the country should be practicing social distancing until at least the end of April. Here are the latest updates.
2020-03-30
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The Sunday Read: What I Learned When My Husband Got Coronavirus

After weeks of caring for her sick husband, our colleague wanted to write an essay about her family?s battle against the coronavirus ? a warning to those in isolation who haven?t experienced the ravages of the virus intimately. Today, we read her letter from the future aloud.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2020-03-29
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Special Episode: Jody's Playlist

Jody Rosen, a writer for The Times Magazine, transports us into his current soundtrack. From Alberta Hunter's ?voice of longevity? to the ?transfixing performance? of Missy Elliott, Jody shares the music that?s helping him find new rhythms ? during these days stuck inside.

Music discussed:

?My Castle?s Rockin?? by Alberta Hunter?I?ll Get By? by Nick Lucas?Lick Shots? by Missy Elliott?Simply Beautiful? by Al Green
2020-03-27
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A Kids? Guide to Coronavirus

Over the last few weeks, children have called into ?The Daily? with a lot of questions about the coronavirus: How did the virus get on earth? What color is coronavirus? And can dogs get it? Today, we try to answer them. Guest: Carl Zimmer, science reporter and author of the ?Matter? column for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Do your children still have more questions? Here?s a guide on how to talk to them about the coronavirus.With many kids home from school, we have some tips for creating structure around your children?s school days, and some recommendations for podcasts to help keep little ones occupied ? and learning.
2020-03-27
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A Historic Stimulus Bill

To rescue the American economy in the coronavirus crisis, Congress is on the verge of adopting the most expensive stimulus bill in U.S. history. But how much is the battle over this measure being influenced by the last financial crisis? Guest: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, the congressional editor of The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

The bill promises a $1,200 payout to millions of Americans, increased jobless aid and grants to save small businesses from permanent closure. Here?s what it means for you.
2020-03-26
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?Raring to Go by Easter?

Last week, President Trump called himself a ?wartime president? as he faced up to the threat caused by the coronavirus. But only days later ? and with the crisis escalating ? he has abandoned that message. What changed?

Guest: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Despite the warnings, President Trump said he believed a crippled economy and forced social isolation would inflict more harm than the spread of the virus.Mr. Trump is now facing a personal dilemma as he responds to the crisis: How can he save his campaign for re-election when so much is suddenly going so wrong?The White House and Congress have reached a $2 trillion stimulus deal, the biggest such package in modern American history. The plan would offer jobless benefits to individuals and direct cash payments to taxpayers.
2020-03-25
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Why the American Approach Is Failing

So far, the United States has been losing the battle against the pandemic, with a patchwork of inconsistent measures across the country proving unequal to halting the spread of the virus. Today, we ask: What will it take to change the course of the crisis?

Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

President Trump has played down the threat of the virus, while at least 16 states institute stay-at-home orders. Here are the latest updates.The rampant spread of the coronavirus has left a trail of loss across most people?s lives. Here is some advice on how to cope.
2020-03-24
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The Pandemic and the Primary

Two weeks ago, the biggest story in the country was the race for the Democratic presidential nomination. Now, with the dramatic onset of the coronavirus crisis, the primary has largely gone off the radar. Today, we talk to Alexander Burns, a political reporter at The New York Times, about what happened when those two stories collided. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

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In a presidential debate without an in-person audience earlier this month, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and Senator Bernie Sanders clashed over how to handle the coronavirus crisis. With so much news, you may have missed the debate ? here are six takeaways to catch you up.Mr. Sanders is now reassessing his campaign as Mr. Biden plans for the nomination, announcing he will pick a woman as his running mate should he be chosen as the candidate.
2020-03-23
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The Sunday Read: The Mixed-Up Brothers of Bogotá

On this special episode of ?The Daily,? one magazine writer reflects on life?s unpredictability and shares her story of a hospital error that scrambled two pairs of Colombian identical twins. This is the story of how the four brothers found one another ? and of what happened next.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2020-03-22
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Special Episode: Alone Together

On this special episode of ?The Daily,? Kevin Roose, a tech reporter for The Times, shares what he?s realized after a week in self-isolation: The internet has become kinder. From virtual birthday parties and singalongs, to happy hours and yoga classes, people are pulling together on the internet, in real time, all over the world. We listen in on what that sounds like.

2020-03-21
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New York City Grinds to a Halt

Across America, businesses are scaling back, firing workers and shutting their doors because of the coronavirus. New York?s Chinatown has been experiencing a downturn for weeks as anxiety and discrimination affected business. Now, the state government has mandated nonessential businesses in the city keep 75 percent of their workers home. So what did it sound like as one of the busiest cities in the world ground to a halt? Five producers at ?The Daily,? Stella Tan, Alexandra Leigh Young, Jessica Cheung, Daniel Guillemette and Andy Mills, spoke to small business owners to find out. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

With so many businesses being forced to close, some indefinitely, claims for jobless benefits surged 33 percent last week. Here are the latest updates on the crisis and its impact on daily life across America.As so much of life begins to shift, we have answers to some common questions about the coronavirus crisis.
2020-03-20
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One City?s Fight to Stop the Virus

New Rochelle, a suburb north of New York City, has one of the largest clusters of coronavirus infections in the U.S. We visited the community to find out how the containment measures were being implemented and how successful they have been. On today?s episode: Sarah Maslin Nir, a breaking news reporter at The New York Times.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo of New York created a ?containment zone? in New Rochelle last week, hoping to curb the spread of the virus in ?the single most troubling area in the state.? Soon after, the National Guard arrived to help implement the measures.New York is among about 10 states that have set up drive-through testing centers, as state and local leaders try to figure out how to safely screen more people.
2020-03-19
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Gov. Andrew Cuomo: ?It?s Making Sure We Live Through This.?

New York was one of the earliest states with confirmed cases of coronavirus, and it now has the most confirmed infections in the U.S. To control the outbreak, the authorities have begun taking increasingly drastic steps, including closing schools and businesses. Today, we talk with the governor, Andrew M. Cuomo, to hear about how he is handling the crisis.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Life in New York, a city of 8.6 million people and an economic engine for the country, is grinding to a shocking halt.The White House issued plans for an economic stimulus that included sending $1,000 to every American. In Europe, leaders voted to seal the borders of 26 countries. Here are the latest updates on the spread of the virus.
2020-03-18
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The Latest: Why President Trump Changed His Tone on the Coronavirus

On Monday, President Trump announced sweeping new guidelines to control the spread of the coronavirus. Among them: encouraging Americans to work from home and to avoid gatherings of more than 10 people. We look at a report that may have inspired the president?s change in tone ? and whether U.S. hospitals are prepared for the potentially staggering projections.

?The Latest,? from the team behind ?The Daily,? brings you the most important developments on today?s biggest news stories.

2020-03-17
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?It?s Like a War?

Italy has become the epicenter of the pandemic?s European migration, with nearly 30,000 infections and more than 2,000 deaths in just a few weeks. These numbers are soaring by the day, even after the government took extreme measures to lock down much of the country. Now, the U.S. surgeon general is warning that America is on a strikingly similar path. Today, we speak to one Italian doctor triaging patients north of Milan about the road that may lie ahead. Guest: Dr. Fabiano Di Marco, a professor at the University of Milan who is also the head of the respiratory unit of the Hospital Papa Giovanni XXIII in Bergamo, a nearby town. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

In less than three weeks, the virus has overloaded hospitals in northern Italy, leaving doctors to decide who lives and who dies. Now, with the country on lockdown, families are having to delay the burial of their loved ones.President Trump released suggested guidelines to control the virus, stopping short of the mandatory lockdown now in place in Italy. Here are the latest updates on the crisis.We hope you are well, wherever you are. Here are a few tips on staying safe and coping in this moment.
2020-03-17
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Why This Recession Will Be Different

In past financial crises, central banks across the world developed a time-tested tool kit to rescue national economies. So why don?t previous interventions seem to be working this time? Guest: Peter S. Goodman, who writes about the economy for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

The Federal Reserve cut interest rates to near zero and said it would buy hundreds of billions of dollars in U.S. government debt, moves reminiscent of its actions during the 2008 financial crisis.The coronavirus is upending life as we know it ? and news is changing rapidly. Here are the latest updates on school closings, travel restrictions and governmental directives.
2020-03-16
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The Sunday Read: This Tom Hanks Story Will Make You Feel Less Bad

On this special episode of ?The Daily,? a magazine writer for The Times reflects on her experience interviewing Tom Hanks last fall ? and on the generosity he showed her in a difficult personal moment. In this time of collective stress, we wanted to bring the story to you in audio as a reminder that ?contagion is real, but it doesn?t just work for viruses,? our writer said. ?It works for kind words and generous thoughts, and acts of selflessness and honesty.?

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2020-03-15
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Special Episode: A Bit of Relief

We?re in a moment that feels scary, uncertain and unsettling, and may feel this way for a while. While we?ll continue to cover the coronavirus pandemic until it?s over, we realize that this time requires more than news and information. We also need release ? and relief. And we?ll do our best to provide that in the coming weeks. To start, we asked a few of our colleagues at The Times to share what?s bringing them comfort right now. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Guests:

Taffy Brodesser-Akner reads from ?Love in the Time of Cholera? by Gabriel García Márquez.Wesley Morris reads from ?In Pursuit of Flavor? by Edna Lewis.Dean Baquet reads from ?On Living in an Atomic Age? by C.S. Lewis.
2020-03-14
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Learning to Live With the Coronavirus

Now that the coronavirus is a pandemic, with both infections and deaths surging in many places across the world, we return to a reporter who has covered the story from the start and ask him how best to navigate this new reality. Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

The World Health Organization now describes the coronavirus as a pandemic, and the number of cases continues to rise worldwide. These basic steps can help you reduce your risk of getting sick or infecting others.The global pandemic is affecting many aspects of daily life. Here are the latest updates on school closures, social distancing measures and event cancellations.
2020-03-13
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Confronting a Pandemic

Global health officials have praised China and South Korea for the success of their efforts to contain the coronavirus. What are those countries getting right ? and what can everyone else learn from them?

Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

While world leaders are finally speaking out about the gravity of the pandemic, their response lacks unity with the United States absent from its traditional conductor role in managing global crises. Stocks tanked again as the outbreak was officially declared a pandemic and policies to address its impact proved lacking or ineffective.All flights to the U.S. have been suspended from Europe. Many schools announced they would close indefinitely, some nursing homes banned visitors, and workplaces across the country have urged their employees to work from home. Here are the latest updates.
2020-03-12
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Why the U.S. Wasn?t Ready for the Coronavirus

Developing a strategy for testing was supposed to be a relatively simple part of preparing for the coronavirus in the United States. So what went wrong? Guests: Sheri Fink, a correspondent for The Times reporting on global public health, and Dr. Helen Y. Chu, an infectious disease expert in Seattle. Dr. Chu was part of a research project that tried to conduct early tests for the coronavirus but failed to obtain state and federal support.For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

During the early days of the outbreak, when containment would have been easier, the federal government missed a series of chances to ensure more widespread testing.After weeks of playing down the potential effects of the coronavirus, President Trump proposed an emergency relief package to bolster the economy ? one that has been met by bipartisan opposition.The number of known U.S. cases of coronavirus infection has passed 1,000, with the virus found in every region of the country. Universities continue to close classrooms. Here are the latest updates on the outbreak. 
2020-03-11
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The Latest: Joe Biden Takes Command

Last night was a make-or-break moment for Senator Bernie Sanders, who needed a comeback from a loss to former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. in the Super Tuesday primaries. After Mr. Sanders lost the primary in Michigan, a state he won in an upset in 2016, we ask: Is Mr. Biden now the presumptive Democratic nominee for president? And if not, what is Mr. Sanders?s path forward? ?The Latest,? from the team behind ?The Daily,? brings you the most important developments on today?s biggest news stories.

2020-03-11
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The Field: What Happened to Elizabeth Warren?

Today, millions of voters across six states will cast their ballots for the two viable Democratic candidates left: former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and Senator Bernie Sanders. What began as a contest with historic diversity of race, gender and sexual orientation has come down to two heterosexual white men over 70.

Astead W. Herndon, who covered Senator Senator Elizabeth Warren for The New York Times, asks: How did we get here? With Austin Mitchell and Jessica Cheung, producers for ?The Daily,? Mr. Herndon traveled to Massachusetts to find out. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Ms. Warren?s position as one of the top-polling candidates early in the race made her a target for attack. Some say the personal criticism she weathered, especially from Mr. Biden, was sexist.She began her campaign with an avalanche of progressive policy proposals, but dropped out after failing to attract a broader political coalition in a Democratic Party increasingly, if not singularly, focused on defeating President Trump.
2020-03-10
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The Latest: Why Markets Crashed on Monday

Within minutes of the U.S. stock market opening on Monday, the S&P 500 sunk so swiftly that it triggered a 15-minute pause in trading, a rare event meant to prevent stocks from crashing. We look at why this happened and what it means for the U.S. economy.

?The Latest,? from the team behind ?The Daily,? brings you the most important developments on today?s biggest news stories. You can find more information about it here.

2020-03-10
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A Test for Abortion Rights

A case before the Supreme Court is the first big test of abortion rights since President Trump created a conservative majority among the justices. We traveled to the Louisiana health clinic at the center of the case to ask what was at stake in the decision. Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times, spoke with Kathaleen Pittman, director of Hope Medical Group for Women in Shreveport, La. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

The justices are considering whether Louisiana can require doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals. While the law is specific, their decision may be a test for the future of abortion rights in America more broadly.Ms. Pittman remembers when there were 11 abortion clinics in Louisiana. Now there are only three, hers among them. After the Supreme Court?s upcoming ruling, there may be only one.
2020-03-09
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The Almost-Peace Deal

After years of false starts, the United States has signed a landmark deal with the Taliban to end the war in Afghanistan. We traveled to the front lines of the war ? and to the signing ceremony in Doha, Qatar ? to investigate whether peace is actually possible.

Guest: Mujib Mashal, senior correspondent for The New York Times in Afghanistan.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

The agreement between Washington and the Taliban seemed to be an important first step in ending the war in Afghanistan. Then the violence started again.Zalmay Khalilzad, the Afghan-born American envoy and architect of the deal, seemed to have been handed an impossible and thankless assignment. Here?s how he pulled it off.
2020-03-06
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The Coronavirus Outbreak in Washington State

A strategy of containment was supposed to protect Washington State from the coronavirus. It didn?t. So what led to the first major outbreak of the pathogen in the United States?

Guests: Mike Baker, a Pacific Northwest correspondent for The New York Times and Bridget Parkhill, a woman whose 77-year-old mother is on lockdown inside a coronavirus-affected nursing facility in Kirkland, Washington. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

A cruise ship off San Francisco has 21 sick passengers on board and is linked to California?s first death from the virus. In the Seattle area, schools have closed, tech workers have been told to work from home and a nursing facility is on lockdown. Here are the latest updates.Officials in California, Oregon and Washington State have said that some patients tested positive for the coronavirus without a known explanation for how they became ill, raising concerns that the virus may be spreading faster than previously thought.We spoke to six Americans with coronavirus. Here?s what they said about their experience while sick.
2020-03-05
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How Super Tuesday Unfolded

The results of Super Tuesday make clear that the race for the Democratic presidential nomination is increasingly a battle between former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and Senator Bernie Sanders. Today, we explore what happened on the biggest night of the race so far. Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Mr. Biden is back as front-runner after sweeping states across the south thanks to moderates and African-American voters, while Mr. Sanders harnessed the backing of liberals and young voters to claim California, the biggest delegate prize of the night.Primary results are still coming in. Here are the latest updates and The Times?s live analysis.
2020-03-04
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Inside the Mind of a Super Tuesday Voter

In the weeks leading up to Super Tuesday, Senator Bernie Sanders was the only candidate to win across multiple states. With his more moderate competitors splitting the vote, his success was built on a coalition of union workers, Hispanics and the college-educated.

Then South Carolina happened. Now, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. is banking on a different coalition ? this time, of suburban, black and older voters. Is the contest for the Democratic nomination now a two-person race? Guest: Brian Keane, a 52-year-old Democratic voter from Arlington, Va, who spoke with Michael Barbaro about his experiences with Mr. Biden and his thoughts on the 2020 election. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Here?s what?s at stake in the 14 states (as well as American Samoa and Democrats Abroad) voting on Super Tuesday.Senator Klobuchar and Mr. Buttigieg both dropped out of the race after the South Carolina primary. Can their backing for Mr. Biden help him capture the moderate vote?Mr. Sanders?s strength has complicated the Democratic establishment?s effort to coalesce support around a single candidate.
2020-03-03
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Joe Biden?s Big Win

For more than 30 years, over three presidential runs, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. has been waiting to notch a victory like the one he received in the South Carolina primary this weekend. The win also prompted former Mayor Pete Buttigieg to end his presidential bid, potentially resetting the race for the Democratic nomination. How did Mr. Biden do it? And what could his success mean for Super Tuesday?

Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Mr. Biden has moved quickly to capitalize on his victory and to recast the Democratic primary campaign as a two-man contest between himself and Senator Bernie Sanders.To maintain momentum, he will have to win again in some states on Super Tuesday. That effort has some notable hurdles to overcome.
2020-03-02
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The Field: Biden?s Last Hope

Former vice president Joseph R. Biden Jr. was once a clear front-runner in the race for the Democratic nomination. Now, he is fighting back from a string of losses and staking his candidacy on his ability to win tomorrow?s South Carolina primary, the first in a state with a large black population. But will he win, and if the margin isn?t as decisive as he hopes, can he stay in the race? Guest: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times traveled to South Carolina with Clare Toeniskoetter and Annie Brown, producers on ?The Daily.? For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

A new poll showed Mr. Biden with a wide lead in South Carolina, with Senator Bernie Sanders and hedge fund billionaire Tom Steyer trailing behind.Mr. Biden lashed out after reports that Mr, Sanders considered mounting a primary challenge to President Barack Obama in 2012, saying it was ?one of the reasons I resent Bernie.?Churches have long played the primary role in mobilizing black support in South Carolina. So how are candidates faring among congregations?
2020-02-28
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The Coronavirus Goes Global

What began as a public health crisis in China is well on the way to becoming a pandemic. And while there is a lot of news about the coronavirus, there is also a lack of understanding about the severity of the threat. As officials warn of a potential outbreak in the U.S., we ask: How bad could the coronavirus get? Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

President Trump sought to reassure the country that the U.S. government was controlling the spread of the coronavirus after his administration weathered days of criticism.Here are the latest updates on the illness?s sweep around the world, with cases in at least 44 countries.What can you do to protect yourself and your family from the virus?
2020-02-27
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Why Russia Is Rooting for Both Trump and Sanders

U.S. intelligence officials have concluded that the Russian government is attempting to interfere in the 2020 presidential race ? but it is doing so by supporting two very different candidates. So why is Russia rooting for both President Trump and Senator Bernie Sanders? Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent and a senior writer at The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Mr. Sanders was briefed on potential interference, and when details of the attempts emerged, he ratcheted up his attacks on Russia, warning President Vladimir V. Putin to stay out of the presidential election.Intelligence officials warned House lawmakers last week that Russia was interfering in the 2020 campaign to try to get the president re-elected. Mr. Trump was angry the intelligence briefing was held at all.What exactly do intelligence officials mean by ?interference?? We don?t know, and officials can?t seem to agree on the scope of the meddling.
2020-02-26
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The Latest: The South Carolina Debate

On the debate stage in Charleston, candidates went after Senator Bernie Sanders, painting his potential nomination as dangerous for the party and questioning his chances of winning against President Trump.

?The Latest,? from the team behind ?The Daily,? brings you the most important developments on today?s biggest news stories. You can find more information about it here.

2020-02-26
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The Weinstein Jury Believed the Women

Harvey Weinstein was found guilty on Monday of two felony sex crimes, and he now faces a possible sentence of between five and 29 years. We asked the reporters who first broke the story about the accusations of sexual misconduct against Mr. Weinstein to explain to us what the jurors in his Manhattan trial were asked to do ? and what it means that they did it.

Guests: Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, investigative reporters for The New York Times and the authors of ?She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement.? For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Mr. Weinstein was found guilty of two felony sex crimes after a trial at which six women testified that he had sexually assaulted them.Sex crimes are notoriously difficult to litigate, often because the cases are so intricate. But for many, Mr. Weinstein?s trial was a crucial landmark in the effort to hold influential men accountable for sexual misconduct.Mr. Weinstein built a network of complicity that dozens of women say kept them silent for years.
2020-02-25
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Can Corporations Stop Climate Change?

In recent weeks, several of the largest and most profitable American companies have introduced elaborate plans to combat climate change. So why are they doing it now? And just how meaningful are their plans? Guest: Andrew Ross Sorkin, a financial columnist for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Laurence D. Fink, the founder of the world?s largest asset management company, sparked the shift toward climate-focused corporate policies in his annual letter to C.E.O.?s. Here?s what the letter said, and why it matters.Protecting the environment and tackling climate change have climbed the list of Americans? political priorities this year as economic concerns have faded. But the issue is as partisan as ever.
2020-02-24
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The Field: An Anti-Endorsement in Nevada

Note: This episode contains strong language.

Senator Bernie Sanders is a staunchly pro-union candidate. But he has found himself mired in an escalating battle over health care with the largest labor union in Nevada. With what some call ?the best insurance in America? ? the fruit of struggles including a six-year strike ? members of the Culinary Workers Union have been reluctant to support Mr. Sanders?s ?Medicare for All? plan. We went to Nevada to ask how what is effectively an anti-endorsement of Mr. Sanders from the union?s leaders may affect his support in the state?s caucuses on Saturday.

Guests: Jennifer Medina, who is covering the 2020 presidential campaign for The Times traveled to Nevada with Clare Toeniskoetter and Austin Mitchell, producers for ?The Daily.? For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Mr. Sanders, who is betting on the Latino vote to win the nomination, is trying to convince Nevada?s union members his policies are in their best interest. His rivals are trying to capitalize on the fight.The Nevada Democratic Party has been scrambling to put in effect safeguards in its caucuses to avoid the technical issues that created a debacle in Iowa. Here?s how the caucuses will work.
2020-02-21
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The Latest: The Nevada Debate

Last night, the Democratic debate in Nevada revealed more open hostility and made more personal attacks than in any of the previous six debates in the race for the nomination. Today, we explore what these attacks reflect about the state of the Democratic race and the urgency that the candidates are feeling.

?The Latest,? from the team behind ?The Daily,? brings you the most important developments on today?s biggest news stories. You can find more information about it here.

2020-02-20
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A Criminal Underworld of Child Abuse, Part 2

Yesterday on ?The Daily,? we heard about the government?s failure to crack down on the explosive growth of child sexual abuse imagery online. In the second half of this series, we look at the role of the nation?s biggest tech companies, and why ? despite pleas from victims ? the illicit images remain online. Guest: Michael H. Keller, an investigative reporter at the The New York Times, and Gabriel J.X. Dance, an investigations editor for The Times, spoke with the mother and stepfather of a teenager who was sexually abused as a child. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

The tech industry has recently been more diligent in identifying online child sexual abuse imagery, but it has consistently failed to shut it down, a Times investigation found. Facebook accounted for more than 85 percent of the imagery flagged by tech companies last year.Two sisters opened up about their lives after being sexually abused as children. Photos and videos of them online continue to remind them of the horrors they experienced.Here?s the first episode in this two-part series, describing how a finding from a tipster led to The Times?s monthslong investigation of online child abuse imagery.
2020-02-20
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A Criminal Underworld of Child Abuse, Part 1

Note: This episode contains descriptions of child sexual abuse.

A monthslong New York Times investigation has uncovered a digital underworld of child sexual abuse imagery that is hiding in plain sight. In part one of a two-part series, we look at the almost unfathomable scale of the problem ? and just how little is being done to stop it. Guests: Michael H. Keller, an investigative reporter at The New York Times, and Gabriel J.X. Dance, an investigations editor for The Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

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Last year, tech companies reported over 60 million online photos and videos of children being sexually abused. Lawmakers foresaw this crisis years ago, but enforcement has fallen short. Our reporters investigated the problem and asked: Can it be stopped?Tech companies detected a surge in online videos of child sexual abuse last year, with encrypted social messaging apps enabling abusers to share images under a cloak of secrecy.Here are six takeaways from The Times?s investigation of the boom in online child sex abuse.
2020-02-19
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Michael Bloomberg?s Not-So-Secret Weapon

Despite being a late entry into the race for the Democratic presidential nomination, Michael R. Bloomberg, the billionaire media tycoon and former mayor of New York City, has surged in the polls and is winning key endorsements before he?s even on the ballot. Today, we explore the hidden infrastructure of influence and persuasion behind his campaign ? and the dilemma it poses for Democrats. Guest: Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

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Who is Mr. Bloomberg? And where does he stand on the key issues?We took a look at how Mr. Bloomberg?s enormous wealth helped build a national political network, and an empire of influence, for his campaign.His run has proved complicated to cover for the media empire he owns.
2020-02-18
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The Post-Acquittal Presidency

Since his acquittal in the Senate, President Trump has undertaken a campaign of retribution against those who crossed him during the impeachment inquiry ? while extending favors to those who have tried to protect him. Today, we explore what has happened so far in this new phase of his presidency. Guest: Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

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Mr. Trump called those who testified against him in the impeachment ?evil,? ?corrupt? and ?crooked.? After he was acquitted, he began firing witnesses.A handful of senators reached out to the White House to warn the president not to dismiss Gordon D. Sondland, the ambassador to the European Union who testified in the House hearings. Mr. Trump removed him anyway.
2020-02-14
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Fear, Fury and the Coronavirus

Note: This episode contains strong language in both English and Mandarin.

What started as a story about fear of a new and dangerous virus has become a story of fury over the Chinese government?s handling of an epidemic. Today, one of our China correspondents takes us behind the scenes of Beijing?s response to a global outbreak. Guest: Amy Qin, a China correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

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President Xi Jinping faces an accelerating health crisis that is also a political one: a profound test of the authoritarian system he has built around himself over the past seven years.China?s leader, who rarely mingles with the public, visited several sites in Beijing and spoke to medical workers in Wuhan via video conferencing.Here are the latest updates on the global outbreak.
2020-02-13
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The Results From New Hampshire

Senator Bernie Sanders won New Hampshire?s Democratic primary last night, with Pete Buttigieg and Senator Amy Klobuchar close behind in second and third. After two candidates once considered front-runners, Senator Elizabeth Warren and former Vice President Joe Biden, finished toward the back of the pack, we consider what Mr. Sanders?s win means for the rest of the race for the Democratic nomination. Guest: Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

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With his New Hampshire win, Mr. Sanders tightened his grip on the Democratic Party?s liberal wing, benefiting from a field that has divided moderate voters.Here are the full results. Unlike in Iowa, where we have yet to declare an official winner, we can confidently say Mr. Sanders won in New Hampshire in a tight race with Mr. Buttigieg.
2020-02-12
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The Field: The Aftershocks of Iowa in New Hampshire

Voters in New Hampshire pride themselves on helping winnow the nomination field. While many polls show Senator Bernie Sanders leading in this year?s primary, the caucus debacle in Iowa meant no single candidate left that first contest with full momentum. We flew from Iowa to New Hampshire, following the campaign trail and talking to voters about whether Democrats who don?t support Sanders are coalescing around another choice.

Guests: Lisa Lerer, a reporter at The New York Times, covering campaigns, elections and political power, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Jessica Cheung, producers on ?The Daily.? For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

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Mr. Sanders and Mayor Pete Buttigieg, of South Bend, Ind., are hoping to make the race for the nomination a two-person contest.Still, after a voting fiasco in Iowa, it?s possible that five leading candidates will survive beyond New Hampshire.President Trump is coming to New Hampshire, too: He?s scheduled to hold a campaign rally in Manchester tonight and will be on the Republican ballot Tuesday. Here are the latest updates from the state?s last day of primary campaigning.
2020-02-11
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The End of Privacy as We Know It?

A secretive start-up promising the next generation of facial recognition software has compiled a database of images far bigger than anything ever constructed by the United States government: over three billion, it says. Is this technology a breakthrough for law enforcement ? or the end of privacy as we know it?

Guest: Annie Brown, a producer on ?The Daily,? spoke with Kashmir Hill, a technology reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

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Federal and state law enforcement officers are using one company?s app to make arrests in 49 states. So what is Clearview AI, and what influence does it hold?Clearview?s app is being used by police to identify victims of child sexual abuse. Some question both the ethics and the accuracy of the results.
2020-02-10
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The Woman Defending Harvey Weinstein

Note: This episode contains descriptions of sexual violence.

In the trial of Harvey Weinstein, six women have taken the stand, each making similar accusations of rape and sexual assault against the movie producer. Throughout their testimony, Weinstein?s defense lawyers have portrayed those encounters as consensual and suggested that in many cases it was the women who wanted something from Mr. Weinstein. His lawyers have seized on the fact that the two women whose accounts are at the center of the criminal charges in his New York trial agreed to have sex and friendly contact with Mr. Weinstein after they were allegedly victimized. Today, one of The Times reporters who broke the story of Mr. Weinstein?s alleged abuse more than two years ago speaks with Donna Rotunno, the lawyer behind Mr. Weinstein?s legal strategy.

Guests: Megan Twohey, an investigative reporter for The Times and co-author of ?She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement," spoke with Donna Rotunno, Harvey Weinstein?s lead defense lawyer. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

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Long before an avalanche of allegations against Mr. Weinstein set off a global reckoning over sexual harassment, Ms. Rotunno was steadily building a career as a criminal lawyer in Chicago with an unusual specialty: defending men accused of sex crimes.Haven?t been following the trial? Here?s what?s happened so far.
2020-02-07
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Mitt Romney?s Lonely Vote

President Trump was acquitted by the Senate on Wednesday of both articles of impeachment. While the vote largely fell along party lines, one senator crossed the aisle to vote to convict him. Today, we hear from Senator Mitt Romney about that choice.

Guest: Senator Mitt Romney, Republican of Utah, who spoke with Mark Leibovich, the Washington-based chief national correspondent for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

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In a speech before voting to convict, Mr. Romney grew emotional as he pronounced the president ?guilty of an appalling abuse of public trust.??I think this is Senator Romney?s moment to shine,? Senator Amy Klobuchar said before the vote, ?I hope he can bring some people with him.? Here?s a behind-the-scenes look at Mr. Romney?s isolation in the Senate and the expectations placed on him before his vote.
2020-02-06
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The State of the Union

Hours after Iowa kicked off the process to choose President Trump?s 2020 opponent, and just a day before the verdict is expected in his Senate impeachment trial, the president gave his third State of the Union address. Today, we take you to The New York Times?s Washington bureau, where we examined the speech ? and the unique moment in which it was delivered.

Guest: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

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Though Mr. Trump didn?t mention impeachment, the process hung over his address, and his refusal to shake Speaker Nancy Pelosi?s hand put the bitterness between them on full display.The speech sounded like a re-election pitch, with the president claiming credit for a ?great American comeback.?
2020-02-05
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