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The Daily

The Daily

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro and Sabrina Tavernise. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

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Episodes

The Last Senate Seat

Georgia voters are heading to the polls for the final battle of the 2022 midterms ? the runoff election between Senator Raphael Warnock, a Democrat, and his Republican opponent, Herschel Walker.

Both parties have their own challenges: Republicans have a candidate quality issue in Mr. Walker, and Democrats are concerned about the turnout of their voter coalition. One side, though, already seems resigned to losing.

Guest: Maya King, a politics reporter covering the South for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

On the eve of Georgia?s Senate runoff, Mr. Warnock warned his supporters about being overconfident, and Mr. Walker urged Republicans to flood the polls.The runoff will answer a big question ? what?s more powerful: a candidate?s skills and experience, or the tug of political partisanship?

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-12-06
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Life in Ukraine as Russia Weaponizes Winter

For months, the war in Ukraine was about territory as both sides fought to control areas in the country?s south and east.

In recent weeks, the war has taken a new turn.

Mounting attacks on civilian infrastructure have left people across Ukraine without power, heat and sometimes water as the snow begins to fall.

Guest: Marc Santora, the International News Editor for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

Even as Ukrainian workers race to restore basic services like electricity, heat and water, new Russian airstrikes send them back to the starting line.Survival kits in elevators, alternative menus in cafes, flashlights and generators everywhere: This is life under Russian bombardment.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-12-05
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The Sunday Read: ?How Noah Baumbach Made ?White Noise? a Disaster Movie for Our Moment?

Jon Mooallem met with the director Noah Baumbach to discuss his latest film, an adaptation of Don DeLillo?s 1985 novel ?White Noise.?

The pair explore the recent chain of personal and public events in Baumbach?s life, including the toll of the coronavirus pandemic and the death of his father, and how this ?routine trauma? has affected his work, and why it prompted him to create a discombobulated, ?elevated reality? for his film in the vein of David Lynch, the Coen brothers and Spike Lee.

This story was written and narrated by Jon Mooallem. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2022-12-04
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Who Pays the Bill for Climate Change?

Last month at COP27, the U.N. climate change conference, a yearslong campaign ended in an agreement. The rich nations of the world ? the ones primarily responsible for the emissions that have caused climate change ? agreed to pay into a fund to help poorer nations that bear the brunt of its effects. 

In the background, however, an even more meaningful plan was taking shape, led by the tiny island nation of Barbados. 

Guest: David Gelles, a climate correspondent for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

As global warming delivers cascading weather disasters, leaders at U.N. climate talks said it?s time to radically overhaul the World Bank and International Monetary Fund.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-12-02
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A Landmark Jan. 6 Verdict

In a landmark verdict, a jury convicted Stewart Rhodes, leader of the Oath Keepers, a right-wing militia, of sedition for his role in the Jan. 6 assault on the U.S. Capitol.

The charge he faced, seditious conspiracy, is one that can be traced to the American Civil War. 

How did federal prosecutors make their case, and what does the verdict tell us about just how organized the attack really was?

Guest: Alan Feuer, a reporter covering courts and criminal justice for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

A jury in federal court in Washington convicted Mr. Rhodes and one of his subordinates for a plot to keep Donald Trump in power.The outcome of the trial was a signal victory for the Justice Department and could hold lessons for future Jan. 6 cases. 

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-12-01
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What It?s Like Inside One of China?s Protests

Over the weekend, protests against China?s strict coronavirus restrictions ricocheted across the country in a rare case of nationwide civil unrest. It was the most extensive series of protests since the pro-democracy movement in Tiananmen Square in 1989.

This is what these demonstrations look and feel like, and what they mean for President Xi Jinping and his quest for ?zero Covid.?

Guest: Vivian Wang, a China correspondent for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

Demonstrations against coronavirus restrictions in China have evolved into broader demands. What are protesters calling for?In a country where protests are swiftly quashed, many who gathered to voice their discontent ? under the watchful eye of the police ? were uncertain about how far to go.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-11-30
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A Secret Campaign to Influence the Supreme Court

For the past few months, Jodi Kantor and Jo Becker, investigative reporters for The New York Times, have looked into a secretive, yearslong effort by an anti-abortion activist to influence the justices of the Supreme Court.

This is the story of the Rev. Rob Schenck, the man who led that effort.

Guest: Jodi Kantor, an investigative reporter for The New York Times. 

Background reading: 

Years before the leaked draft opinion overturning Roe v. Wade, a landmark contraception ruling was disclosed, according to Mr. Schenck.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-11-29
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Qatar?s Big Bet on the World Cup

The World Cup, the biggest single sporting event on the planet, began earlier this month. By the time the tournament finishes, half the global population is expected to have watched. 

The 2022 World Cup has also been the focus of over a decade of controversy because of its unlikely host: the tiny, energy-rich country of Qatar. 

How did such a small nation come to host the tournament, and at what cost?

Guest: Tariq Panja, a sports business reporter for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

The decision to take the World Cup to Qatar has upturned a small nation, battered the reputation of global soccer?s governing body and altered the fabric of the sport.Many in Qatar say the barrage of criticism about its human rights record and the exploitation of migrant workers is laced with discrimination and hypocrisy.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-11-28
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Talking Turkey: A Holiday Special Edition

Being tasked with the turkey on Thanksgiving can be a high-pressure, high-stakes job. Two Times writers share what they?ve learned.

Kim Severson takes listeners on a journey through some of the turkey-cooking gimmicks that have been recommended to Americans over the decades, and J. Kenji López-Alt talks about his foolproof method for roasting a bird.

Guest: Kim Severson, a food correspondent for The New York Times; and J. Kenji López-Alt, a food columnist for The Times. 

Background reading: 

From brining to bagging to clothing the bird in cotton, every year brings a fresh cooking trick that promises perfection. Here are the oddest and most memorable.The secret to great Thanksgiving turkey is already in your fridge, according to J. Kenji López-Alt. 

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2022-11-23
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The ?Tripledemic? Explained

This winter, three major respiratory viruses ? respiratory syncytial virus or R.S.V., the flu and the coronavirus ? are poised to collide in the United States in what some health officials are calling a ?tripledemic.?

What does this collision have to do with our response to the coronavirus pandemic, and why are children so far the worst affected?

Guest: Apoorva Mandavilli, a science and global health reporter for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

Most cases of Covid, flu and R.S.V. are likely to be mild, but together they may sicken millions of Americans and swamp hospitals, public health experts warned.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2022-11-22
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Trump Faces a New Special Counsel

Donald J. Trump is running for president again. Donald J. Trump is back on Twitter again. And now a special prosecutor has been appointed to investigate Donald J. Trump again.

In the saga of the Trump investigations, there seem to be recurring rhythms and patterns. Here?s what to know about the latest developments.

Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, a Washington correspondent for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

The two major criminal investigations involving Mr. Trump examine his role in the lead up to Jan. 6 and his decision to retain sensitive government documents at his home in Florida.What is it that makes a special counsel ?special??

For more information on today?s episode, visit 

nytimes.com/thedaily

. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2022-11-21
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The Sunday Read: ?What Does Sustainable Living Look Like? Maybe Like Uruguay?

Across the world, developed nations have locked themselves into unsustainable, energy-intensive lifestyles. As environmental collapse threatens, the journalist Noah Gallagher Shannon explores the lessons in sustainability that can be learned from looking ?at smaller, perhaps even less prosperous nations? such as Uruguay.

?The task of shrinking our societal footprint is the most urgent problem of our era ? and perhaps the most intractable,? writes Shannon, who explains that the problem of reducing our footprints further ?isn?t that we don?t have models of sustainable living; it?s that few exist without poverty.?

Tracing Uruguay?s sustainability, Shannon shows how a relatively small population size and concentration (about half of the country?s 3.5 million people live in Montevideo, the capital) had long provided the country with a collective sense of purpose. He also shows how in such a tight-knit country, the inequalities reach a rapid boil, quoting a slogan of a Marxist-Leninist group called the Tupamaros: ?Everybody dances or nobody dances.?

Looking for answers to both a structural and existential problem, Shannon questions what it would take to achieve energy independence.

This story was written by Noah Gallagher Shannon and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

 

2022-11-20
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'The Run-Up': The Post-Mortem

The midterm elections have left both parties in a moment of reflection. For Republicans, it?s time to make a choice about Trumpism, but one that may no longer be theirs to make. For Democrats, it?s about how much of their future is inherently tied to the G.O.P. 

2022-11-19
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The Man Who Was Supposed to Save Crypto

Earlier this year, much of the crypto industry imploded, taking with it billions of dollars. From that crash, one company and its charismatic founder emerged as the industry?s savior.

Last week, that company collapsed.

Who is Sam Bankman-Fried, how did he become the face of crypto, and why did so many believe in him?

Guest: David Yaffe-Bellany, a reporter covering cryptocurrencies and fintech for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

Here?s what to know about the collapse of FTX.In an interview with The Times, Mr. Bankman-Fried said he had expanded too fast and failed to see warning signs. But he shared few details about his handling of FTX customers? funds.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-11-18
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The Far Right Rises in Israel

This week, Israel swore in a new Parliament, paving the way back to power for former Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, even as he is on trial for corruption. Now, the country is on the cusp of its most right-wing government in history.

Who and what forces are behind these events in Israeli politics?

Guest: Patrick Kingsley, the Jerusalem bureau chief for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

To win election, Mr. Netanyahu and his far-right allies harnessed perceived threats to Israel?s Jewish identity after ethnic unrest and the subsequent inclusion of Arab lawmakers in the government.The rise of the Israeli far right has stoked fear among some Palestinians of a surge of violence.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2022-11-17
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A Republican House

Divided government appears poised to return to Washington. In the midterm elections, the Republicans seem likely to manage to eke out a majority in the House, but they will have a historically small margin of control.

The Republican majority will be very conservative, made up of longtime members ? some of whom have drifted more to the right ? and a small but influential group of hard-right Republicans who are quite allied with former President Donald J. Trump and helped lead the effort to try to overturn the 2020 election.

What can we expect from this new Republican-controlled House?

Guest: Julie Davis, congressional editor for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

After the midterm elections, the Republican ranks in the House have grown more extreme and slightly more diverse.Republican rebels are trying to make their leaders sweat after a worse-than-expected outcome in the elections.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-11-16
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Another Trump Campaign

Days after voters rejected his vision for the country in the midterms, former President Donald J. Trump is expected to announce a third run for president.

Despite the poor results for candidates he backed, why are Republican leaders powerless to stop him?

Guest: Maggie Haberman, a White House correspondent for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

Republicans may still win the House. But an underwhelming showing has the party wrestling with what went wrong: Was it bad candidates, a bad message or Mr. Trump?Mr. Trump has faced unusual public attacks from across the Republican Party.Republicans pushing to move past the former president face one big obstacle: His voters.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-11-15
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The Nation?s ?Report Card? on Remote Learning

On the first nationwide test of American students since the pandemic, scores plummeted to levels not seen in 20 years. The results show how challenging it was to keep students on track during the pandemic.

What do the scores tell us about remote learning, who lost the most ground academically, and what can schools do to help students recover?

Guest: Sarah Mervosh, a national reporter for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

In the U.S., students in most states and across almost all demographic groups have experienced troubling setbacks in both math and reading, according to an authoritative national exam released last month.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2022-11-14
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The Sunday Read: ?Young and Homeless in Rural America?

Sandra Plantz, an administrator at Gallia County Local Schools for more than 20 years, oversees areas as diverse as Title I reading remediation and federal grants for all seven of the district?s schools. In recent years, though, she has leaned in hard on a role that is overlooked in many districts: homeless liaison.

Ms. Plantz?s district, in rural Ohio, serves an area that doesn?t offer much in the way of a safety net beyond the local churches. The county has no family homeless shelters, and those with no place to go sometimes end up sleeping in the parking lot of the Walmart or at the hospital emergency room.

Homeless students have the worst educational outcomes of any group, the lowest attendance, the lowest scores on standardized tests, the lowest graduation rates. They all face the same cruel paradox: Students who do not have a stable place to live are unable to attend school regularly, and failing to graduate from high school is the single greatest risk factor for future homelessness.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2022-11-13
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How Democrats Defied the Odds

This week?s elections have been startlingly close. Control of both chambers of Congress remain up in the air.

Historically, the president?s party is blown away in midterms. And the Democrats were further hampered this time round by President Biden?s unpopularity.

Considering the headwinds, how did they do so well?

Guest: Nate Cohn, chief political analyst for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

President Biden appears to have had the best midterms of any president in 20 years.Election denial didn?t play as well as Republicans hoped. And former President Donald Trump has faced unusual public attacks from across his party following a string of losses.As the results continue to come in, here are the latest updates.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-11-10
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The Republican Wave That Wasn?t

In the early hours of Wednesday, control of both the House and Senate remained uncertain.

Going into the midterms, some analysts expected a repudiation of the Democrats and a surge of Republican victories. But this ?red wave? did not materialize. 

Today, we try to make sense of the surprising results. 

Guest: Astead W. Herndon, a national political reporter for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

As the results continue to come in, follow the latest updates here

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-11-09
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How Democracy Itself Ended Up on the Ballot in Wisconsin

Over the last decade, Wisconsin has become an extreme experiment in single-party rule. Republican officials have redrawn the state?s election districts and rewritten laws to ensure their domination of the state?s legislature.

In Tuesday?s elections, those officials are asking voters for the final lever of power: control over the entire system of voting. 

Guest: Reid J. Epstein, a reporter covering elections and campaigns for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

In Wisconsin, a 50-50 battleground state, Republicans are close to capturing supermajorities in the State Legislature that would render the Democratic governor irrelevant even if he wins re-election.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-11-08
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John Fetterman and the Fight for White Working-Class Voters

For the Democrats to hold on to power in Washington, they have to do what President Biden did in Pennsylvania two years ago: Break the Republican Party?s grip on the white working-class vote, once the core of the Democratic base. 

In tomorrow?s midterm election, no race better encapsulates that challenge than the Pennsylvania Senate candidacy of John Fetterman.

Is the plan working or is this crucial group of voters now a lost cause for the Democrats?

Guest: Shane Goldmacher, a national political reporter for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

Among white working-class voters in places like northeast Pennsylvania, the Democratic Party has both the furthest to fall and the most to gain.In the final days of the Pennsylvania Senate race, Mr. Fetterman has acknowledged that his recovery from a stroke remains a work in progress, leaning into the issue with a mix of humor, sarcasm and notes of empathy. 

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-11-07
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The Sunday Read: ?Taken Under Fascism, Spain?s ?Stolen Babies? Are Learning the Truth?

The phenomenon of babies stolen from hospitals in Spain, once shrouded in secrecy, is now being spoken about.

The thefts happened during the end of the regime of Francisco Franco, the right-wing dictator who ruled the country until 1975, and even today the disappearances remain a subject of mystery and debate among scholars.

According to the birth mothers, nuns who worked in maternity wards took the infants shortly after they were delivered and told the women, who were often unwed or poor, that their children were stillborn. But the babies were not dead: They had been sold, discreetly, to well-off Catholic parents, many of whom could not have families of their own. Under piles of forged papers, the adoptive families buried the secret of the crime they committed. The children who were taken were known in Spain simply as the ?stolen babies.? No one knows exactly how many were kidnapped, but estimates suggest tens of thousands.

Nicholas Casey relates Ana Belén Pintado?s discovery, after the deaths of her parents, that she was a ?stolen baby,? and considers the web of culpability and the tricky question of blame, as Spain reckons with its past.

This story was written by Nicholas Casey and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

 

2022-11-06
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?The Run-Up': The Grass Roots, Part 2

This moment in politics will be defined by shifts at the grass-roots level. It wasn?t long ago that Democrats used to brag about the coalition they had built ? full of young people, minority voters and college-educated women. Today, we talk to members of the Democratic base, many of whom no longer see a clear path forward for the party.

?The Run-Up? is a new politics podcast from The New York Times. Leading up to the 2022 midterms, we?ll be sharing the latest episode here every Saturday. You can search for ?The Run-Up? wherever you get your podcasts. Visit nytimes.com/therunup for more.

2022-11-05
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Can Abortion Still Save the Democrats?

With an unpopular president and soaring inflation, Democrats knew they had an uphill battle in the midterms.

But the fall of Roe v. Wade seemed to offer the party a way of energizing voters and holding ground. And one place where that hope could live or die is Michigan.

Guest: Lisa Lerer, a national political correspondent for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

Some top Democrats say that their party has focused too much attention on abortion rights and not enough on worries about crime or the cost of living.The outcome of the midterms will affect abortion access for millions of Americans. Activists on both sides are focused on races up and down the ballot.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-11-04
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Why the Supreme Court Might End Affirmative Action

For decades, many universities have used race as a factor when deciding which students to admit. In the past, the Supreme Court has backed that practice, called affirmative action, in the interest of creating a diverse student body.

This week, however, the majority-conservative court is considering a case that may change affirmative action forever.

Guest: Adam Liptak, a correspondent covering the Supreme Court for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

The Supreme Court appears ready to rule that race-conscious admissions programs at Harvard and the University of North Carolina were unlawful.In the clash over affirmative action, both sides invoke Brown v. Board of Education, the unanimous 1954 decision that said the Constitution prohibits racial segregation in public schools.

For more information on today?s episode, visit 

nytimes.com/thedaily

. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2022-11-03
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The Man Who Tried to Kidnap Nancy Pelosi

Early on Friday, an intruder broke into the San Francisco home of Nancy Pelosi and bludgeoned Ms. Pelosi?s husband, Paul, with a hammer.

The shocking attack underlined fears about the growing number of threats against members of Congress and the woeful lack of security around those lawmakers.

Guest: Catie Edmondson, a congressional correspondent for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

A trail of strained relationships. An itinerant life that included a stint living in a storage unit. A personality that was ?consumed by darkness.? Who is the man accused of attacking Mr. Pelosi?The assault at the Pelosi home comes as threats against members of Congress have increased in recent years.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-11-02
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Twitter in the Time of Elon Musk

It was long awaited, and some doubted that it would ever come to pass, but last week, the tech billionaire Elon Musk officially took over Twitter.

The platform was once the place of underdogs, a public square that allowed users to challenge the moneyed and powerful. Is that about to change?

Guest: Kevin Roose, a technology columnist for The New York Times, and co-host of the Times podcast ?Hard Fork.?

Background reading: 

A decade ago, Twitter was a tool for rebels and those challenging authority. But over time, the powerful learned how to use it for their own goals.Mr. Musk and a group of his advisers have been meeting with company executives, working on layoffs, ordering up product changes, talking with advertisers and reviewing content moderation policies.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-11-01
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Xi Jinping Opens a New Chapter for China

Four years ago, Xi Jinping set himself up to become China?s leader indefinitely.

At last week?s Communist Party congress in Beijing, he stepped into that role, making a notable sweep of the country?s other top leaders and placing even greater focus on national security.

Guest: Chris Buckley, chief China correspondent for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

At the congress, Mr. Xi didn?t mention two long-repeated maxims. To many, it?s a warning of the turbulent times to come.Mr. Xi has created a new ruling elite packed with loyalist officials primed to elevate his agenda of bolstering national security and turning China into a technological great power.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-10-31
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The Sunday Read: ?Why We Take Animal Voyages?

For Sam Anderson, a staff writer, traveling with animals can lead to enlightening experience. In this essay for The New York Times Magazine, Mr. Anderson explores what he has learned from a lifetime of voyaging with animals, and what it means to connect with another creature: bridging spiritual, physical and even temporal distances, and reaching into ?something like evolutionary time.?

?An animal voyage,? Mr. Anderson writes, ?is special because it requires us to make many journeys all at once.?

This story was written and narrated by Sam Anderson. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2022-10-30
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'The Run-Up': The Grass Roots, Part 1

This moment in politics will be defined by shifts at the grass-roots level. Today, we talk to conservative voters about the forces animating the midterm elections for them ? and what Washington can learn from the people. 

What do you think of ?The Run-Up? so far? Please take our listener survey at nytimes.com/therunupsurvey. 

?The Run-Up? is a new politics podcast from The New York Times. Leading up to the 2022 midterms, we?ll be sharing the latest episode here every Saturday. If you want to hear episodes when they first drop on Thursdays, follow ?The Run-Up? wherever you get your podcasts, including Apple, Spotify, Google, Stitcher and Amazon Music.

2022-10-29
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Two Futures Face Off in Brazil

Voters in Brazil on Sunday will choose between two larger-than-life, populist candidates in a presidential race that is widely seen as the nation?s ? and Latin America?s ? most important election in decades.

Who are the candidates, and why is the future of Brazilian democracy also on the ballot?

Guest: Jack Nicas, the Brazil bureau chief for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

The contest ? a matchup between Brazil?s two biggest political heavyweights ? could swing either way and promises to prolong what has already been a bruising battle that has polarized the nation and tested the strength of its democracy.For the past decade, Brazil has lurched from one crisis to the next. Brazilians will decide between two men who are deeply tied to its tumultuous past.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-10-28
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Is New York (of All Places) About to Go Red?

As Democratic Party leaders assessed their vulnerabilities in this year?s midterm elections, the one state they did not worry about was New York. That ? it turns out ? was a mistake.

Despite being a blue state through and through, and a place President Donald J. Trump lost by 23 points two years ago, the red tide of this moment is lapping at New York?s shores.

Why is New York up for grabs?

Guest: Nicholas Fandos, a Metro reporter for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

Ahead of the midterms, New York has emerged from a haywire redistricting cycle as perhaps the most consequential congressional battleground in the country.Republicans are pressing their advantage deep into Democratic territory in the closing stretch of the 2022 campaign, competing for an abundance of House seats.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-10-27
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The Trump Subpoena

A few days ago, when the House committee investigating Jan. 6 issued a subpoena to former President Donald J. Trump, it raised a legal question: Can Congress compel a former president to testify?

The committee?s move, while dramatic, is not without precedent.

What do presidential subpoenas of the past teach us about the moment we?re in, and about what the former president might do next?

Guest: Luke Broadwater, a congressional reporter for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

The Jan. 6 committee issued a subpoena to Mr. Trump, paving the way for a potentially historic court fight over whether Congress can compel testimony from a former president.If the former president fights the subpoena, his lawyers are likely to muster a battery of constitutional and procedural arguments for why a court should allow him not to testify.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-10-26
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How Europe?s Energy Crisis Exposed Old Fault Lines and New Anxieties

In the early days of its war on Ukraine, Russia cut off gas supplied to most of Europe, plunging the continent into the most severe energy crisis in decades.

Soaring prices have put some European leaders on the defensive over their support of Ukraine in the war as they navigate economic crises and bubbling unrest at home.

Guest: Matina Stevis-Gridneff, the Brussels bureau chief for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

European countries are facing dwindling supplies of Russian natural gas. The scarcity has distorted the market, driving gas prices to historic highs and pulling up the price of electricity.The downfall of Britain?s prime minister sent perhaps the clearest signal yet that political peril awaits those who fail to address inflation and the erosion of living standards.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-10-25
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Running an Election in the Heart of Election Denialism

This episode contains strong language. 

Hundreds of candidates on the ballot in November still deny that President Biden won in 2020 ? a level of denialism that is fueling harassment and threats toward election workers. 

Few have experienced those attacks as viscerally as election workers in Arizona. Today, we speak with the top election official in the state?s largest county. 

Guest: Stephen Richer, the recorder of Maricopa County in Arizona. 

Background reading: 

Election officials are on alert as voting begins for midterm elections, the biggest test of the American election system since former President Donald J. Trump?s lies about the 2020 results launched an assault on the democratic process.Over 370 Republican candidates have cast doubt on the 2020 election despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary, according to a New York Times investigation.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-10-24
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The Sunday Read: ?How Yiyun Li Became a Beacon for Readers in Mourning?

Yiyun Li has garnered legions of fans with her unsparing prose, writing extensively about her own struggles with depression and suicidality.

Her latest novel, ?The Book of Goose,? is no different, sharing the same quality that has made Ms. Li something of a beacon to those suffering beneath unbearable emotional weight.

Alexandra Kleeman, also a novelist, meets Ms. Li to discover the secrets of her charm, her experience of growing up in China and her writing process.

This story was written by Alexandra Kleeman and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2022-10-23
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'The Run-Up': What 12 Years of Gerrymandering Has Done to Wisconsin

How a 12-year project to lock in political power in Wisconsin could culminate in this year?s midterms ? and provide a glimpse into where the rest of the country is headed. 

?The Run-Up? is a new politics podcast from The New York Times. Leading up to the 2022 midterms, we?ll be sharing the latest episode here every Saturday. If you want to hear episodes when they first drop on Thursdays, follow ?The Run-Up? wherever you get your podcasts, including on Apple, Spotify, Google, Stitcher and Amazon Music.

2022-10-22
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The Rapid Downfall of Liz Truss

Prime Minister Liz Truss of Britain has resigned after only 44 days in office. Hers is the shortest premiership in the country?s history.

What led to her downfall, and why has Britain entered a period of such profound political dysfunction?

Guest: Mark Landler, the London bureau chief for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

Prime Minister Liz Truss?s resignation, yet another episode of political instability, only added to Britons? concerns and frustrations over galloping inflation and a looming economic crisis.Her fate was sealed three weeks ago when currency and bond traders reacted to her new fiscal program by torpedoing the pound and other British financial assets.Penny Mordaunt, Rishi Sunak and Ben Wallace, all current or former Conservative cabinet members, are seen as candidates to replace Ms. Truss. 

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-10-21
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Why Republicans Are Winning Swing Voters

After a summer of news that favored Democrats and with just two weeks until the midterms, a major new poll from The Times has found that swing voters are suddenly turning to the Republicans.

The Times?s Nate Cohn explains what is behind the trend and what it could mean for Election Day.

Guest: Nate Cohn, the chief political analyst for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

According to the Times/Siena College poll, American voters see democracy in peril, but saving it isn?t a priority.Despite Democrats? focus on abortion rights, disapproval of President Biden seems to be hurting his party.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-10-20
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Race, Power and the Leaked Recording in Los Angeles

This episode contains strong language.
A leaked audio recording of Latino lawmakers in Los Angeles making racist comments has created a political firestorm and brought demands for resignations.

But not only has the uproar forced the authorities to reckon with what officials say behind closed doors, it has also raised a sharp issue: Why is a city with so many Latino constituents represented by so few of them?

Guest: Shawn Hubler, a California correspondent for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

The recording of the private conversation between three council members and a labor leader has already led to two resignations. Here?s what to know about the controversy.The disparaging remarks highlighted a history of racism within the Latino community.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-10-19
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Did Hurricane Ian Bust Florida?s Housing Boom?

Since Hurricane Ian devastated southwestern Florida last month, residents have filed a record number of insurance claims for the damage caused by the storm.

Today, Chris Flavelle, a climate reporter for The Times, discusses whether the insurance companies can survive. And if they can?t, what will the effect be on Florida?s housing market, the cornerstone of its economy?

Guest: Christopher Flavelle, a climate reporter for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

The hurricane?s record-breaking cost will make it even harder for many to get insurance, experts say ? threatening home sales, mortgages and construction.Aerial videos and photos show the destruction caused by Hurricane Ian on Fort Myers Beach, Fla.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-10-18
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The Personal and Political Saga of Herschel Walker

Herschel Walker, the former football star who is running for the Senate, is, according to the Times political reporter Maya King, a ?demigod in Georgia sports and in Georgia culture.?

The midterm election in that state is crucial ? it could determine whether Democrats keep control of the Senate. Mr. Walker?s candidacy, however, has been tainted by a slew of stories about his character, including claims that he paid for an abortion for a former girlfriend despite publicly opposing the procedure.

Guest: Maya King, a politics reporter covering the South for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

How Republicans cast aside concerns and learned to love Mr. Walker.Will any of the allegations against Mr. Walker actually matter?

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-10-17
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The Sunday Read: ?Daring to Speak Up About Race in a Divided School District?

In July 2020, Stephanie Long, the school superintendent in Leland, Mich., wrote a heartfelt letter to her students and their families after George Floyd?s murder by Minneapolis police officers. Haunted by the images she?d seen in the media, she wrote: ?Why be in a position of leadership,? she asked herself, ?and not lead??

?All people of color,? Ms. Long typed, ?need us to stand with them to clearly state that we condemn acts of systematic and systemic racism and intolerance.? She envisioned profound pedagogical changes in her school; she imagined creating illuminating discussions within classrooms and searching, transformative conversations in the community beyond. She hit send. A degree of support came in reply. A letter of praise signed by 200 Leland alumni was published in a peninsula newspaper.

But angry emails, phone calls and letters poured in from within the district and, because Long?s message made the local news and spread over the internet, from across the country. They labeled her ?a disgrace,? ?a Marxist,? ?a traitor.?

Daniel Bergner, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine, wrote about what happened when a superintendent in northern Michigan raised the issue of systemic racism.

This story was written by Daniel Bergner recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

 

2022-10-16
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'The Run-Up': The Stacey Abrams Playbook

When Georgia flipped blue in the 2020 election, it gave Democrats new hope for the future. Credit for that success goes to Stacey Abrams and the playbook she developed for the state. It cemented her role as a national celebrity, in politics and pop culture. But, unsurprisingly, that celebrity has also made her a target of Republicans, who say she?s a losing candidate. On today?s episode: the Stacey Abrams playbook, and why the Georgia governor?s race means more to Democrats than a single elected office.

?The Run-Up? is a new politics podcast from The New York Times. Leading up to the 2022 midterms, we?ll be sharing the latest episode here every Saturday. If you want to hear episodes when they first drop on Thursdays, follow ?The Run-Up? wherever you get your podcasts, including on Apple, Spotify, Google, Stitcher and Amazon Music.

2022-10-15
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The Fear Facer: An Update

In 2019, Julia Longoria, then a Daily producer, traveled to Nashville to speak with Ella Maners and her mother, Katie Maners.

Ella, 8 going on 9, was terrified of tornadoes and getting sick. So she did something that was even scarier than her fears: confront them at Fear Facers camp.

We revisit her story and catch up with Ella, now 12 and in the fifth grade, who has since returned to the camp.

Background reading: 

Three years ago, Ella spent a week at Fear Facers Summer Camp, a day camp in Florida that helps children learn to deal with obsessive-compulsive and anxiety disorders.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2022-10-14
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'The Decision of My Life': Part 3

This episode contains mention of suicide.

A year ago, Lynsea Garrison, a senior producer on The Daily, started telling the story of N, a teenager in Afghanistan.

N?s family tried to force her to marry a member of the Taliban, but she resisted. When she tried to escape to the U.S., however, her case was rejected, so she had to remain in Kabul, fearful and in hiding.

Here?s what happened next.

If you are having thoughts of suicide, and you live in the United States, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 (TALK). You can find a list of additional resources at SpeakingOfSuicide.com/resources. Additional resources in other countries can be found here.

Background reading: 

Listen to Part 1 and Part 2 of N?s story, which we first began to follow after the Taliban?s takeover of Afghanistan.A single year of extremist rule has turned life upside down for Afghans, especially women.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2022-10-13
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A Bridge, a Bomb and Putin?s Revenge

Just before the sun came up on Saturday on the Kerch Strait Bridge, a strategically and symbolically important link between Russia and the Crimean Peninsula, a bomb detonated, creating a giant fireball.

But Ukrainian elation about the explosion quickly turned into concern about how Russia would respond. And in the days since, Moscow?s retaliation has been to pound Ukrainian cities with missiles in the most sweeping rocket assault since the start of the war.

Guest: Michael Schwirtz, an investigative reporter for The New York Times.

Background reading: 

President Vladimir V. Putin vowed that more strikes would follow if Russian targets were hit again.The hail of missiles also seemed intended to appease the hard-liners in Russia who are furious with the humiliating setbacks on the battlefield.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2022-10-12
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The Rise of the Single-Family Home

To tackle its critical shortage of affordable housing, California has taken aim at a central tenet of the American dream: the single-family home.

Telling the story of one such property, in San Diego, can teach us about the larger housing crisis and how we might solve it.

Guest: Conor Dougherty, an economics reporter at The New York Times and author of ?Golden Gates: Fighting for Housing in America.?

Background reading: 

The transformation of 5120 Baxter Street in San Diego is a projection of California?s tighter, taller future.NIMBYs, referring to residents who fight nearby development ? especially anything involving apartments ? are often blamed for worsening the housing crisis.

For more information on today?s episode, visit 

nytimes.com/thedaily

. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2022-10-11
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